University of Alaska Anchorage Takes Steps to Address Nursing Shortage

University of Alaska Anchorage Takes Steps to Address Nursing Shortage

The University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) School of Nursing has begun taking steps to address a statewide and nationwide nursing shortage. According to AlaskaJournal.com, health care is one of the fastest growing job sectors in the country. The US Department of Labor Statistics reports that in 2014, there were 11.8 million workers employed in the health care industry, with 2.7 million of that workforce represented by registered nurses.

The average age of nurses nationwide is 50 or older, with 30 percent of that population preparing to retire. This statistic has led many health care organizations to brace for a nationwide nursing shortage, UAA included.

In an effort to meet the industry’s needs, the UAA School of Nursing has begun finding practical solutions to lessen the burden of a progressing shortage of nurses. UAA Nursing Director Marianne Murray and Vice Provost of Health Programs and Dean of the College of Health Jeffrey Jessee are focusing on their own state first and how they can be responsive to the community’s needs.

They began by making a statewide tour to meet with UAA satellite campuses, health care organizations, and leaders that can help them with outreach to other education sites where the nursing program can help fill gaps in health care around the state.

UAA is tackling the nursing shortage by creating internal and external goals to implement within the next two years. Their first step is to increase faculty members, expand facilities, and collaborate with health care stakeholders to expand admissions, cohort sizes, and graduate more nurses. They also intend to increase diversity of faculty and students, and place an emphasis on cultural competency as an admissions marker. By expanding their admittance criteria, UAA hopes to open the door to a wider pool of prospective students who might not have previously considered a career in nursing.

To learn more about UAA’s initiatives to tackle the nationwide nursing shortage, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Marie Carmel Garcon Named Nurse Practitioner of the Year by Nurse Practitioner Association New York State

Nurse of the Week: Marie Carmel Garcon Named Nurse Practitioner of the Year by Nurse Practitioner Association New York State

Our Nurse of the Week is Marie Carmel Garcon, DNP, Columbia University School of Nursing, who has been named the 2017 Nurse Practitioner of the Year by the Nurse Practitioner Association New York State (NPA). Dr. Garcon’s award aligns with National Nurse Practitioner Week 2017, taking place November 12-18.

Garcon leads the House Calls services at ColumbiaDoctors Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Group, the faculty practice of Columbia Nursing, where she provides primary care directly to Washington Heights and Inwood residents who have difficulty leaving their homes. This involves overseeing patients’ care the same way she would in a clinical setting, setting up specialty visits like X-rays and blood work in patients’ homes, and managing their overall care.

The NPA is recognizing Garcon for her outstanding commitment to providing compassionate care after serving the Columbia University Medical Center community for more than 28 years. An NPA release states:

“Dr. Garcon has extensive experience working on the front lines of intensive care and oncology units and is able to advocate for patients and their families giving voice to those who cannot speak for themselves due to illness. Among her many noteworthy accomplishments over her 20-year career as a family nurse practitioner, Dr. Garcon established a support group for patients and families affected by pancreatic cancer.”

The NPA has been recognizing a Nurse Practitioner of the Year since 1987. Garcon was presented with her award at the NPA’s 33rd Annual Conference on October 21 in Saratoga Springs, NY. To learn more about Dr. Garcon and the NPA, visit here.

Southwestern Oklahoma State University Offers Dual MSN/MBA Degree Option

Southwestern Oklahoma State University Offers Dual MSN/MBA Degree Option

Southwestern Oklahoma State University (SWOSU) has begun offering a dual Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) and Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree option to equip nurses with business skills that are often expected from them as their careers advance. The School of Nursing and School of Business and Technology have created a partnership to offer the new online program.

Dr. Marcy Tanner, associate dean of the SWOSU School of Nursing, tells NewsOK.com, “The demand for nurse executives and administrators with a business background has never been higher. There are many competitive roles for nurse administrators that would benefit from hiring a nurse with both advanced preparation as a nurse and as a business manager. Many nurses are asked to take on these leadership roles without the additional knowledge that a business degree can offer.”

The dual online MSN/MBA program gives nurses training and skills that most pick up on their own as they progress in their careers. Many nurses are asked to help manage aspects of the business, supervise employees, and manage departments even though they don’t have a formal education or background in business administration.

Many nurses are interested in pursuing administrative positions but don’t have the business background. Earning an MBA helps open the doors. Graduates of the SWOSU program receive training in continuous quality improvement, marketing and administrative functions, and personnel management and leadership.

SWOSU’s nursing program is known for its practice-oriented approach and its business programs have a reputation as high-quality programs that prepare graduates for leadership roles in any industry. The program is offered online in an accelerated format consisting of courses offered over 8 weeks. To learn more about SWOSU’s dual MSN/MBA Program, visit here.

Nurse Practitioner Association New York State Cites Study on Expanding Role of NPs in Providing Care

Nurse Practitioner Association New York State Cites Study on Expanding Role of NPs in Providing Care

The Nurse Practitioner Association New York State (NPA) recently cited a new study outlining the increasing number and influence of nurse practitioners in the state in celebration of National Nurse Practitioner Week 2017, November 12-18.

Stephen Ferrara, DNP, FNP, FAANP, Associate Dean of Clinical Affairs at Columbia School of Nursing and Executive Director of The NPA, stated in a press release, “Nurse Practitioners focus not only on diagnosing and managing acute and chronic illnesses, but also on integrating evidence based practice, health promotion, disease prevention, and patient education to help patients understand their complete health picture. We thank SUNY Albany’s School of Public Health for their study highlighting the professional credentials and expanding role of NPs as vital providers of health care to people throughout New York State.”

The study, titled “A Profile of New York State Nurse Practitioners, 2017,” was conducted by the Center for Health Workforce Studies at SUNY Albany’s School of Public Health. Key elements of the study included:

  • Approximately 13,000 active NPs are practicing in New York State
  • More than 90% of active NPs report holding a master’s degree or post-master’s certificate as their highest NP degree
  • The vast majority of NPs report a certification in a primary care specialty; nine percent of NPs report a certification in psychiatry
  • Just over half of NPs work in health centers, clinics, and hospital outpatient departments, while another 18% work in physician offices
  • More NPs per 100,000 population work in urban areas than in rural areas of the state
  • NPs in rural areas are more likely to provide primary care or psychiatric services than their urban counterparts
  • Forty-three percent of NPs in the state work in federally designated primary care health professional shortage areas (HPSAs)
  • Nearly 70% of NPs in rural areas work in primary care HPSAs, compared with 39% of NPs in urban areas

According to NPA, there are approximately 234,000 nurse practitioners in the United States, with an additional 23,000 NP students graduating each year. National Nurse Practitioner Week is intended to emphasize the importance of removing outdated barriers to practice so that NPs will be allowed to practice to to the full extent of their experience and education.

To learn more about National Nurse Practitioner Week and Nurse Practitioner Association New York State, visit here.

Professor Nancy Glass Named Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Endowed Chair

Professor Nancy Glass Named Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Endowed Chair

Nancy Glass, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN, was recently named the Independence Foundation Chair in Nursing Education at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON). Glass is known for being a researcher, clinician, educator, and public health advocate, as well as professor and associate director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health.

Dean Patricia Davidson, PhD, MEd, RN, FAAN, tells Newswise.com, “Dr. Glass has made a tremendous impact on our school and the health of women and families worldwide. She is one of the most successful nurses globally, and awarding this chair to her is an appropriate recognition of her stellar career.”

The endowment was created in 1989 by the Independence Foundation of Philadelphia for an academic chair that could help nursing programs engage in long-term planning and support programs for education. Glass has helped further excellence in education at JHSON by serving as director of the MSN/MPH Public Health Nursing program, coordinator of the Coverdell Peace Corps Fellows program, and holding a joint appointment in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Glass has used her career to improve the health of women and families on a national and global level. She tells Newswise.com, “Educational opportunities are crucial to building and supporting future generations of nurses. This is an exciting honor to be able to help lead the school in facilitating scholarship and the power of knowledge.”

To learn more about Glass and her career in nursing, visit here.