University of Michigan-Flint to Launch Doctoral Program in Nurse Anesthesia

University of Michigan-Flint to Launch Doctoral Program in Nurse Anesthesia

The University of Michigan-Flint (UM-Flint) recently announced that it will be introducing a new Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice (DNAP) degree set to start in Fall 2018. This new degree program will be part of UM-Flint’s School of Health Professions and Studies (SHPS) and will replace the existing Master of Science in Anesthesia program.

DNAP is a three-year program, designed to allow students to continue in their current nursing jobs for the first year. This program will prepare doctorate level nurse anesthetists to become excellent clinical practitioners and prepare students to embrace broader roles within health care.

Dr. Donna Fry, Dean of the School of Health Professions and Studies, tells News.UMFlint.edu:

“Advancing the nurse anesthetist program from the master’s to doctoral level will provide more educational time with students, ensuring they are well educated in contemporary anesthesia practice.”

The current anesthesia program at UM-Flint is an educational leader and innovator in the field. It became the first fully accredited clinical doctorate nurse anesthesia completion program in the state of Michigan in 2011, and awarded the state’s first Doctor of Anesthesia Practice (DrAP) degree in 2013.

The Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice degree is for professionals who are already certified registered nurse anesthetists but who want to advance their skillsets and prepare for expanded leadership roles and teaching roles. Students also have the option to earn their degree in conjunction with a Master of Business Administration for those interested in health care administration roles. Program curriculum includes a range of healthcare education and training in health policy, teaching, research, and finance.

UM-Flint will be accepting 20 to 25 new students to join the program every academic year. To learn more about the new Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice degree program, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Emergency Department Nurse Darren Moon Receives Healing Hands Award

Nurse of the Week: Emergency Department Nurse Darren Moon Receives Healing Hands Award

Our Nurse of the Week is Darren Moon, a staff nurse in the Loma Linda University Medical Center emergency department, who recently received the 500th Healing Hands Award for his lifesaving care. When patient David Colwell was admitted after experiencing symptoms of a heart attack, Moon stepped in and took the necessary steps to ensure that Colwell received the lifesaving medical care he needed.

Moon was reunited with the patient whose life he saved after Colwell nominated him for the Loma Linda University Health Healing Hands Program. Surrounded by emergency department colleagues, Moon was recognized for his actions as the 500th Healing Hands Grateful Patient Program recipient.

According to News.LLU.edu, Colwell addressed Moon at the awards presentation with the following: “Thank you for your expertise and quick action to address my situation. I understand you were also part of the team in the cardiac cath lab who attended to me. I’m glad you are part of the Loma Linda family.” The nomination came as a surprise to Moon, but he was honored to receive the 500th Healing Hands pin.

The Loma Linda University Health Healing Hands Program provides patients a way to recognize staff members who have provided exceptional care, according to their website. The program allows patients and their families to give a gift of any amount, and direct it to supporting the campus in any way they choose along with a note to the caregiver.

Connie Cunningham, executive director of emergency services at Loma Linda University Health, praised Darren with kind words: “Darren is an amazing nurse, skilled and well-rounded. When David arrived in the emergency department, Darren was focused and calm as he sifted through all of the symptoms.”

Time is of the essence with patients like David who exhibit cardiac-related indicators, and thanks to Moon’s lifesaving care, Colwell is now in good health. To learn more about Moon and Colwell’s nurse-patient relationship, visit here.

Vanderbilt School of Nursing Receives $1.2M Grant to Support Doctor of Nursing Practice Students

Vanderbilt School of Nursing Receives $1.2M Grant to Support Doctor of Nursing Practice Students

The Vanderbilt University School of Nursing recently received a $1.2 million grant from the US Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Nurse Faculty Loan Program to support Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) students who plan to become nursing faculty. The grant is designed to help increase the number of qualified nursing faculty in colleges and universities across the country.

Linda Norman, DSN, RN, FAAN, Valere Potter Menefee Professor of Nursing and Dean of the School of Nursing at Vanderbilt, tells Nursing.Vanderbilt.edu:

“The nursing profession is in the enviable position of experiencing increasing demand for nurses and seeing record numbers of students apply to nursing programs. Well-qualified faculty are needed to instruct and mentor those students. This loan forgiveness program encourages and equips doctorally prepared nurses to become effective faculty nurse scholars.”

DNP students who plan to teach are eligible to receive a NFLP award that underwrites tuition, books, fees, and other associated costs. Following their graduation, loan recipients who are employed as nursing faculty at any school of nursing in the United States for at least four years will have 85 percent of their loan forgiven. Students are then given a 10-year period to pay back the remaining 15 percent.

DNP students at Vanderbilt also take courses on nursing education as part of their overall coursework. This is because of the importance of increasing the number of doctorally prepared faculty in nursing programs across the country to better educate the nursing professionals of the future. 65 Vanderbilt DNP students graduated from the program last year, and more than 270 graduates have received the loan since its inception in 2008.

To learn more about Vanderbilt’s Doctor of Nursing Practice student grants, visit here.

University at Buffalo School of Nursing Receives $2.4M to Expand Mental Health Care in American Indian Communities

University at Buffalo School of Nursing Receives $2.4M to Expand Mental Health Care in American Indian Communities

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has granted $2.4 million in funding to the University at Buffalo (UB) School of Nursing to increase access to mental health care and substance abuse treatment among American Indian communities in Western New York.

Provided as three separate grants, the awards will allow the university to hire nursing staff and train nursing students in rural and underserved areas, develop mental health and substance abuse screening and treatment programs, and provide telehealth access for remote treatment.

Yu-Ping Chang, associate professor and associate dean for research and scholarship in the UB School of Nursing, will be partnering with the Tuscarora Health Center, the only primary care clinic serving the Tuscarora Indian Reservation in Lewiston, to increase access to mental health and substance abuse screening and treatment at the facility. Chang tells the UB News Center:

“American Indians and Alaskan Natives have endured both limited and differential access to resources, creating disparities in health status and a lack of exposure to quality health care when compared with other racial and ethnic groups. They also have increased risks for many health conditions, including mental health and substance abuse, which leads to higher mortality rates.”

The grants are intended to fund the development of an interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) team to lead screenings and behavioral health care, and to provide clinical training to graduate students in the UB School of Nursing and School of Social Work. To learn more about UB’s efforts to expand mental health care access for American Indian communities, visit here.

Georgia Southern University School of Nursing Receives $1.3 Million Grant

Georgia Southern University School of Nursing Receives $1.3 Million Grant

Georgia Southern University’s School of Nursing recently received a $1.3 million federal grant to help train nurse practitioner students to work in five health center organizations in southeastern Georgia. The program is called The Advanced Nursing Education Workforce (ANEW) and is funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration.

The ANEW program is intended to “support efforts to prepare advanced-practice nursing students to practice in rural and underserved settings through academic and clinical training.” Registered nurses who are working toward advanced nurse-practitioner degrees at Georgia Southern will work with five Federally Qualified Health Centers during their required clinical practicums for three to six months.

Sharon G. Radzyminski, PhD, RN, chair of Georgia Southern’s School of Nursing, tells StatesboroughHerald.com:

“If [the students] accept the traineeship money and do their practicum in one of these places, the hope is, and we would strongly encourage students to consider, working in one of these health clinics after they graduate. These clinics work with rural and underserved populations, and they are in need of primary care practitioners.”

With the grant, the academic-practice partnership between the Georgia Southern School of Nursing and the five health centers will help increase the number and readiness of Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) and Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) graduates to care for rural and underserved populations. To learn more about the ANEW project, visit here.

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