Capella School of Nursing and Health Sciences Adds Dr. Cole Edmonson to Advisory Board

Capella School of Nursing and Health Sciences Adds Dr. Cole Edmonson to Advisory Board

Cole Edmonson, DNP, RN, FACHE, NEA-BC, FAAN, recently joined Capella University’s School of Nursing and Health Sciences Advisory Board. As a member of the advisory board, Dr. Edmonson will be responsible for collaborating with Capella leaders and faculty to help effectively prepare nurses for today’s complex health care environment.

Over the course of his 20 year career, Dr. Edmonson has served as a direct-care nurse, supervisor, manager, director, and associate chief nursing officer. He holds a BSN and MSN from the University of Oklahoma, and a DNP from Texas Christian University. Dr. Edmonson is currently the chief nursing officer at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas.

F. Patrick Robinson, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of Capella’s School of Nursing Health Sciences, announced in a press release, “By working closely with industry experts at the front lines of health care, Capella is constantly evolving its models of teaching and learning, with the goal to close the gap between higher education and patient care. Dr. Edmonson will provide the board with invaluable insights on how Capella can help equip tomorrow’s nurse leaders with the right competencies.”

The Capella Advisory Board is in place to provide industry insight to school leaders and faculty to uphold Capella’s mission to meet the needs found within the health care sector. To learn more about Capella’s Advisory Board and new member Dr. Edmonson, visit here.

Cal State Fullerton Receives $1.4 Million Grant to Support Advanced Practice Nurse Training

Cal State Fullerton Receives $1.4 Million Grant to Support Advanced Practice Nurse Training

Cal State Fullerton has partnered with Mountains Community Hospital and Rural Health Clinics to place nurse-midwife and women’s health nurse practitioner trainees at a critical access point for communities near the San Bernardino Mountains. The partnership is called the “Rural-Women of the Mountains Accessing New Services (Rural-WOMANS)” Project and is being launched through a two-year federal grant totaling $1.4 million.

The project is designed to expand women’s health services, creating a pipeline of nursing professionals trained to serve in rural communities that are difficult to recruit and retain advanced practice nurse practitioners. Ruth Mielke, associate professor of nursing and women’s health care concentration coordinator, tells News.Fullerton.edu:

“The rationale is that if a student has a positive clinical experience training in an underserved site, that student may be more likely to consider working in that site or a similar site after graduation.”

Students placed in certain clinic locations will be eligible to receive traineeship scholarships each semester. Forty traineeships will be available starting in Spring 2018 to help cover the costs of tuition, living expenses, and books. There will be an emphasis on supporting students who want to pursue obstetrics-gynecology, rural health, psychiatric, and mental health issues. To learn more about Cal State Fullerton’s grant to support advanced practice nurse training in rural areas, visit here.

UW-Madison School of Nursing Receives $1.3 Million Grant to Recruit Native American Students

UW-Madison School of Nursing Receives $1.3 Million Grant to Recruit Native American Students

The University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison) School of Nursing recently received a $1.3 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration to develop a program to recruit and retain 30 Native American nursing school students.

The project is called “Success Through Recruitment/Retention, Engagement, and Mentorship (STREAM) for American Indian Students Pursuing Nursing Careers” in alignment with a Wisconsin Center for Nursing goal to expand the diversity of the nursing workforce to mirror the diversity of the population they serve.

Native American students are among the most under-represented on the UW-Madison campus, including the nursing program. According to Nursing.Wisc.edu, the Wisconsin nursing workforce is 94 percent white, but the Wisconsin population is only 79 percent white. In addition, 90 percent of nurses who provide services in Wisconsin tribal health facilities are white while a majority of patients are American Indian.

Dr. Audrey Tluczek, director of the recruitment program, tells Channel3000.com, “Having nurses who are actually members of a community is really vital to addressing the great health disparity that actually exists in these communities…We only have one or two students per year who self-identify as American Indian, or Native American.”

The UW-Madison School of Nursing is working with the Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council to recruit and retain 30 Native American nurses and create opportunities for future students and impact health outcomes in their local community. Funding from the grant will provide financial support for Native American nursing students and help develop peer support programs for these students. To learn more about the STREAM grant, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: New Nurse Deanna Pavil Tackled Nursing School with Pregnancy and Newborn

Nurse of the Week: New Nurse Deanna Pavil Tackled Nursing School with Pregnancy and Newborn

Our Nurse of the Week is newlywed and new nurse Deanna Pavil who received a big surprise just two days after finding out she was pregnant – she had also been accepted to nursing school at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Pavil was aware of the challenges that would come with juggling pregnancy and a newborn with a rigorous nursing school schedule and didn’t know how to make the right decision. However, her parents encouraged her to follow her dreams and she is now graduated and working as a registered nurse in the outpatient clinics at Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation.

“I enjoyed working in medical records, but knew it wasn’t what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. I wanted to do more to help people and make a difference in their lives. The same week I quit my job, I got a phone call about the CNA class.”

Pavil had known she wanted to pursue a career in healthcare since high school when her family traveled to Anchorage for her grandmother’s open-heart surgery. After high school, she worked in medical records at Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Regional Hospital for four years, then started taking classes to become a certified nurse aid (CNA). It was then that she realized her true calling to become a nurse, and later graduated from UAF with an associate of applied science degree in nursing in December 2016.

In an interview with News.UAF.edu, Pavil says, “I enjoyed working in medical records, but knew it wasn’t what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. I wanted to do more to help people and make a difference in their lives. The same week I quit my job, I got a phone call about the CNA class.”

Pavil was thankful for her CNA experience which made the transition into nursing school much easier. It gave her the training and academic foundation needed to succeed in a challenging nursing school program, but she also couldn’t have graduated without the help of her husband and parents who took time off to help care for her son Bennett. Now that she is a working nurse, Pavil says the best part of her nursing work is helping people in her community.

Thank you, Deanna, for showing other nurses that it’s possible to pursue personal and professional goals simultaneously if you’re willing to put in the hard work. To learn more about Pavil and her experience tackling nursing school and a new family at the same time, visit here.

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Named NLN Center of Excellence

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Named NLN Center of Excellence

The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing was recently designated a Center of Excellence by the National League for Nursing (NLN). The NLN utilizes their Center of Excellence program to recognize schools that demonstrate a commitment to excellence and invested resources to distinguish themselves in a specific area of nursing education.

UAB was recognized for its sustained efforts to “Enhance Student Learning and Professional Development,” a four-year designation that will remain through 2021. Doreen C. Harper, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of the UAB School of Nursing, tells UABNews:

“This designation is an external confirmation of the UAB School of Nursing’s commitment to preparing future nursing leaders, and aligns with our strategic goals of maintaining excellence in teaching and learning, and provides acknowledgement of faculty efforts in continual quality improvement.”

UAB School of Nursing faculty and students are honored by the Center of Excellence designation, and especially proud of the School of Nursing’s dedication to producing professional and advanced practice nurses to care for patients in rural and underserved areas. The school will be recognized at the NLN’s 2017 Education Summit, held in San Diego, CA in September. To learn more about the UAB School of Nursing, visit here.

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