UAB Nurse Erin Currie Earns Grant to Examine Pediatric Care for Infants in Deep South

UAB Nurse Erin Currie Earns Grant to Examine Pediatric Care for Infants in Deep South

Erin Currie, PhD, MSN, RN, an assistant professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing, has received a grant to examine the pediatric palliative care needs of infants and neonatal intensive care units in the Deep South. The two-year, $154,000 grant from the National Palliative Care Research Center will make a big difference in the health care of children in this region.

Currie tells the Birmingham Business Journal, “Pediatric palliative care – which focuses on comprehensive and holistic care for the families and helps with quality of life, symptom management and spiritual suffering – adds a layer of support for seriously ill infants and their parents. Pediatric palliative care is a comprehensive safety net for parents, and I am going to focus my research efforts on increasing access to that safety net for them.”

Currie is the only nurse among the five recipients of the grant this year. Her research will explore the impact and quality of pediatric palliative health care service for this historically underrepresented population which has experienced many health disparities due to geographic, societal, and cultural factors.

By studying infant medical records and interviews with parents following an infant’s death in the NICU, Currie will identify unmet needs encountered during the child’s hospitalization to help improve the pediatric palliative care provided in the Deep South. Currie will be collaborating with the NICUs at Children’s Hospital of New Orleans, Baston Children’s Hospital in Jackson, MS, and Children’s of Alabama.

To learn more about Currie’s career in nursing and study of pediatric palliative care, visit here.

Auburn University Dedicates New School of Nursing Building

Auburn University Dedicates New School of Nursing Building

Auburn University recently dedicated its new School of Nursing building to bring students and faculty together. Construction on the 89,000-square-foot building began in spring 2016, and is now complete providing a home for new nursing classrooms, offices, and simulation labs all under one roof.

Ashley Westberry, a senior in the School of Nursing, tells BizJournals.com, “The new building serves as a proud place that we can call home. It will bring a name to nursing as a whole on Auburn’s campus. The building will serve as a way to say, ‘We’re here and doing amazing things.’ I am truly honored to be a part of this program and excited to see where it is headed in the future.”

Auburn’s School of Nursing has grown from 55 new students a year in 2009 to 210 new students this semester, creating a need for more faculty and a new and improved space. New resources in the nursing building include a skills lab and advanced simulation suite with 21 high-fidelity mannequins and four observation areas. The building also includes new study spaces, outdoor areas, and dining options.

One of the most important features of the new building is that it is designed with the nursing student in mind. According to Auburn.edu, every designed decision was carefully made in order to best enhance the student experience.

To learn more about Auburn University’s new School of Nursing building, visit here.

University of Alabama Huntsville Dean Marsha Adams Inducted into Nursing Hall of Fame

University of Alabama Huntsville Dean Marsha Adams Inducted into Nursing Hall of Fame

Dr. Marsha Howell Adams, PhD, RN, CNE, ANEF, FAAN, Dean of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) College of Nursing, was recently inducted into the University of Alabama (UA) Nursing Hall of Fame. Adams is highly respected throughout the state of Alabama for her contributions to nursing and nursing education.

Known for being a transformative leader in nursing education, Adams was inducted into the Nursing Hall of Fame for her dedication to the nursing profession. Beyond her role as Dean at UAH, Adams also developed KidCheck, an innovative partnership that links nursing programs and community partners to improve the health of Alabama’s children. Adams is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and the Academy of Nursing Education.

Dr. Adams tells www.UAH.edu, “Being selected for the nursing Hall of Fame is a wonderful accomplishment for me and one that I will always cherish because it awards my achievements in both nursing education as well as practice.”

Adams received her bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing. She also earned a post-doctoral certificate in rural case management from the UA Capstone College of Nursing. Her other credentials include serving as past president of the National League for Nursing and a current Fellow in the University of Alabama and Southeastern Leadership Conference.

Dr. Adams was honored for her induction to the Nursing Hall of Fame during a ceremony on Oct. 5. To learn more about Dr. Adams and her role as Dean of the UAH College of Nursing, visit here.

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Receives $4 Million to Support Graduate Programs

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Receives $4 Million to Support Graduate Programs

The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing recently announced that they have received more than $4 million in funding to support graduate programs for the 2017-18 academic year. The funding will go toward supporting students who are preparing for careers as advanced practice nurses, nurse educators, and nurse researchers, and to help expand primary care services for rural and medically underserved populations.

Dean and Fay B. Ireland Endowed Chair in Nursing, Doreen C. Harper, tells AL.com, “The UAB School of Nursing remains vested in providing patients, families and the profession with the best-educated advanced practice nurses, educators and researchers, and these funds are critical to our mission. They help to ensure that our best and brightest continue their advanced nursing studies and become the leaders of the world’s nursing workforce and those who will meet our greatest health care challenges head on through education, research and clinic practice.”

The funding sources include $2.66 million from the US Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), for their Advanced Nursing Education Workforce (ANEW) Program and Nurse Faculty Loan Program (NFLP). The ANEW funding will allow the school to enhance and expand its commitment to increasing primary care for rural populations across Alabama by integrating behavioral health care training. The NFLP funding will support doctoral students who are committed to becoming nurse educators through the school’s PhD or Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs.

To learn more about UAB’s nursing graduate programs, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Calvin Kennedy, UAB Nurse and Kidney Transplant Recipient, Climbs Mount Kilimanjaro to Showcase the Power of Organ Donation

Nurse of the Week: Calvin Kennedy, UAB Nurse and Kidney Transplant Recipient, Climbs Mount Kilimanjaro to Showcase the Power of Organ Donation

Our Nurse of the Week is Calvin Kennedy, a Nurse Team Leader in the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s (UAB) Post-Anesthesia Care Unit. As a two-time kidney transplant recipient, Kennedy joined Team Mountain in climbing Mount Kilimanjaro to showcase the power of organ donation.

Kennedy joined Team Mountain to help raise awareness for kidney disease and the power of living, proving that deceased-donation gives recipients a second chance at life. He made the trip to Tanzania, Africa over the summer with 11 other members of Team Mountain who were motivated to bring awareness to organ donation.

Unfortunately, Kennedy was an hour and a half into the last climb when his body wouldn’t let him climb any further. Suffering from torn ligaments in one of his knees and intestinal parasites he acquired while climbing, Kennedy was exhausted and in excruciating pain at 17,000 feet above sea level with only three miles left to go. Disappointed but aware that he would be endangering his teammates by continuing, Kennedy knew it was time to turn around, and that reaching the summit was not the ultimate message he was trying to send. He tells UAB.edu:

“I wanted to show people that, when you do get a transplant, you can live and live well and do things – do great things. And if you donate an organ as a living donor or a deceased donor, you can help someone live a productive and exciting life. I think this accomplished that. I hope I did.”

Mount Kilimanjaro is the tallest freestanding mountain in the world. 35,000 tourists attempt the climb every year, but only about half of them make it to the peak. Kennedy is proud of his teammates who did make it to the summit and the entire team’s efforts to prove the power of organ donation.

To learn more about Kennedy’s experience climbing Mount Kilimanjaro alongside Team Mountain, visit here.

University of Alabama Huntsville Welcomes New Nursing Professor Dr. Thuy Lam Lynch

University of Alabama Huntsville Welcomes New Nursing Professor Dr. Thuy Lam Lynch

The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) recently welcomed a new faculty member to the College of Nursing. Dr. Thuy Lam Lynch recently began her tenure as an Assistant Professor of Nursing at UAH. After earning her undergraduate degree in nursing from UAH, Lynch says becoming a nursing professor at the university feels like coming home.

Dr. Lynch was born in Saigon, Vietnam, and realized at a young age that she wanted to become a nurse after encountering the kind and caring nature of her own nurses during a hospital stay as a young patient. Lynch grew up in Huntsville, AL, and after graduating high school with honors she enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at UAH. Explaining her decision to pursue higher education, Lynch tells UAH.edu:

“I was inspired and encouraged by my hospital nursing director to pursue a Master’s degree in Nursing. I believe in life-long learning, so naturally I enrolled in a PhD nursing program at The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). My studies in the doctoral program helped to shape my worldview and better understand the experiences of others.”

Lynch graduated from UAB in 2012 with distinguished doctoral student honors and a specialty in pediatric nursing. She is honored to be among the faculty at UAH and give back to the nursing program where her career started. This fall she will be teaching Mental Health Nursing in the undergraduate program at UAH.

To learn more about Dr. Thuy Lam Lynch and her career in nursing, visit here.