Grant Provides Path to Nursing for American Indian Students at Cal State San Marcos

Grant Provides Path to Nursing for American Indian Students at Cal State San Marcos

Five American Indian students are attending the California State University (Cal State) San Marcos School of Nursing through a recently awarded grant called Graduating American Indians into Nursing (GAIN). The grant covers tuition, books, fees, and a stipend of $1,500 per month for each student.

Dr. Deborah Morton, an assistant professor of public health and co-principal investigator on the grant identified the potential students for the program. Dr. Denise Boren, co-principal investigator and director of the Cal State San Marcos School of Nursing will step down from her director role at the end of the academic year to focus on grants and more direct involvement with GAIN students.

Dr. Boren tells News.CSUSM.edu: “Nurses spend so much time with patients. It’s really important to have nurses who understand the American Indian culture.” This is one of the reasons for the grant, helping provide American Indian students with a path to pursue a nursing degree and improve healthcare for American Indians as these students graduate into the profession. Dr. Morton also commented on the benefits of the grant: “We have a nursing shortage in California and we have more American Indians than any other state. It was a great opportunity for us.”

One of the requirements of the grant is that students spend an equal amount of time working in an Indian Health Service clinic upon graduation as a form of scholarship payback. This means committing three years of their time after graduation, which aligns perfectly with grant goal of helping improve healthcare for American Indians.

To learn more the GAIN grant and the American Indian recipients pursuing nursing degrees at Cal State San Marcos, visit here.

Kent State University College of Nursing Celebrates History of Diversity on 50th Anniversary

Kent State University College of Nursing Celebrates History of Diversity on 50th Anniversary

The Kent State University (KSU) College of Nursing celebrated their 50th anniversary this past Monday, Jan. 23. Gathering together the entire college of nursing, students and faculty showed up to celebrate the college’s historic past while focusing on diversity and staying on the cutting edge of technology as they move forward.

KSU President Beverly Warren and Dean of the College of Nursing, Dr. Barbara Broome, both attended the celebration to give speeches about their experiences in nursing and predictions for the future of healthcare. According to KentWired.com, President Warren emphasized the importance of diversity with a snippet from her past: “In my generation, I was told, as a female, you can either teach or be a nurse. 50 years later, I’m proud to say you have so many options before you. Whether you’re male, female, transgender, no matter how you identify yourself, there is a career for you in nursing.”

Both nursing leaders gave recognition to their students who they said are a legacy of bright new ideas. Nursing isn’t just a women’s profession anymore and students love Kent’s approach to diversity and drive to break stereotypes of what defines the typical nurse. Dr. Broome summed up diversity simply:

“Inclusiveness means males, females, different races, ethnic groups, religious beliefs and lifestyles, and I think that nursing should be a lot more inclusive than it has been…It’s for anyone who has a desire to make an impact and change things.”

Looking to the future, President Warren hopes for more nursing specialties and to bring state-of-the-art technology to Kent because she believes technology drives healthcare. Kent’s nursing leaders embody the college’s values and have no plans of letting up. They’re striving for graduates who impact their communities and beyond by staying at the cutting edge of nursing.

Nursing Students from Pennsylvania College of Technology Participate in Study Abroad Course at Guatemala Medical Clinic

Nursing Students from Pennsylvania College of Technology Participate in Study Abroad Course at Guatemala Medical Clinic

After learning about cultural diversity by reading a nursing textbook, five nursing students from Pennsylvania College of Technology got to go out and experience diversity firsthand. Participating in a study abroad course, students traveled to the small town of Nueva Santa Rosa, Guatemala to treat patients in a medical clinic for seven days.

The Penn College students were led by Christine B. Kavanagh, the instructor of nursing programs, and accompanied by a larger volunteer group from Glens Falls Medical Mission. Glens Falls is based in New York and leads weekly trips to the small Guatemala community twice a year to help patients who live two hours away from the nearest hospital.

During their weeklong stint at the medical clinic, the group of volunteers saw over 1,300 patients by communicating through translators. They practiced in five clinical areas including triage, dental, pediatrics, women’s health, and general medicine, providing basic screenings, treatments, medical education, fluoride for dental care, and referrals to outside specialists when needed. Students were amazed by the positivity exuded by their patients who experience a wide variety of issues, not just medical.

Penn College offers a variety of study abroad courses, but this was the first time nursing students participated in a trip. After a successful mission, they hope to offer the course and service trip to nursing students every fall. In addition to the nursing trip, Penn College also offers a course in providing dental hygiene education in the Dominican Republic.

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Receives Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Receives Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award

INSIGHT Into Diversity Magazine has chosen the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON) to receive a 2016 Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award. INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine is the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education and recognizes US nursing, medical, dental, pharmacy, osteopathic, and allied health schools. JHSON will be featured in the December 2016 issue of the magazine, demonstrating their outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Patricia Davidson, PhD, MEd, RN, FAAN, Dean of JHSON, says that advancing and supporting a culture of diversity and inclusion are top priorities at her school. The students and faculty at JHSON bring their own unique experiences, cultures, and views, and they are respected and valued by all members at the school.

31 percent of students and 23 percent of faculty at JHSON are racial or ethnic minorities. JHSON provides opportunities for students and faculty to develop and implement programs and partnerships that strengthen their inclusive environment through a school-wide diversity taskforce. Some of those programs include LGBTQ Life at Hopkins and the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

The HEED Award involves a comprehensive and rigorous application including questions about recruitment and retention of students and employees, leadership support, and campus diversity and inclusion initiatives. INSIGHT says their standards are high because they want to choose institutions where diversity and inclusion are a part of the work being accomplished daily across a campus.