Francis Marion University Receives Grant to Promote Diversity in Nursing

Francis Marion University Receives Grant to Promote Diversity in Nursing

The nursing program at Francis Marion University (FMU) recently received a federal grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) intended to help promote diversity in the field of nursing. FMU will use the four-year grant to support 100 nursing students by providing financial help, assigning graduate mentors to work with undergraduate students, and offering academic support through the Center for Academic Success and Advising.

Roughly 30-40 percent of FMU’s nursing student population is composed of minority groups, but the university hopes to increase that number to 50 percent to better represent the population of students on campus. Dr. Ruth Wittman-Price, dean of the School of Health Sciences, tells PatriotNewsOnline.com, “The whole goal of the grant is to increase workforce diversity. The workforce in any community should mimic the demographics of the community. This will assist us to get that closer in line.”

Students chosen to receive help from the grant were chosen based on a number of factors. Those students have been split into groups of 10 and paired with a graduate student mentor in nursing or psychology. Students will meet with their graduate mentors twice a month in a group setting and mentors will follow their students through all four years of their education.

To learn more about FMU’s new nursing grant and efforts to increase diversity in the field of nursing, visit here.

Cal State Fullerton School of Nursing Awarded $2 Million to Increase Workforce Diversity

Cal State Fullerton School of Nursing Awarded $2 Million to Increase Workforce Diversity

The California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) was recently awarded a $2 million, four-year grant to help further diversity initiatives in the School of Nursing. The award was one of 30 granted this year by the US Department of Health and Human Services, Resources and Services Administration Division of Nursing.

CSUF is seeking to address the social determinants that create challenges for disadvantaged and underrepresented nursing students through the School of Nursing’s new project titled “Enrichment Markers of Better Relationships, Academics and Cultural Enhancement” (EMBRACE). Stephanie Vaughn, professor and director of the School of Nursing, tells News.Fullerton.edu:

“Ultimately, the grant is going to help us graduate professional nurses who understand cultural variances, exhibit cultural competency and value diversity in the workplace.”

The funding will go toward hiring a learning specialist and counselor for the School of Nursing, a comprehensive review of the admissions process, and cultural competence training for faculty and staff. $600,000 of the funding is also earmarked for student scholarships to be awarded over the next four years. CSUF’s School of Nursing aims to increase the number of underrepresented students, particularly Latinos, across its undergraduate and graduate programs by 20 percent.

To learn more about CSUF’s nursing programs and diversity initiatives, visit here.

University of Alabama Receives $1.7 Million Grant to Increase Number of Latino Nurses

University of Alabama Receives $1.7 Million Grant to Increase Number of Latino Nurses

The University of Alabama (UA) Capstone College of Nursing recently received a $1.7 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration Nursing Workforce Diversity Program to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared Latino nurses.

With help from the grant, the university will target and recruit 80 Latino associate degree registered nurses to earn their Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree through the College of Nursing’s online RN-BSN program as part of the Bama-Latino Project.

Dr. Norma Cuellar, UA professor of nursing, tells the Ledger-Enquirer: “Right now, the RN population is made up of 83 percent white/Caucasian nurses who are caring for a very diverse population. While we teach our students about cultural sensitivity, we know that many times when people are being cared for by someone who is not like them, there is a barrier that may impact health care outcomes. Sometimes it’s communication, sometimes it’s cultural. Both can pose a problem in delivered health care.”

Latinos make up 17.3 percent of the US population, but fewer than 5 percent of US nurses are Latino according to UA News. Latinos aren’t pursuing nursing because many do not receive the academic support they need in junior and high school in addition to financial barriers that keep them from pursuing higher education. UA hopes that once students in the Bama-Latino Project complete their bachelor’s degrees in nursing they will continue to pursue masters and doctoral nursing degrees.

To learn more about the Bama-Latino Project, visit here.

Grant Provides Path to Nursing for American Indian Students at Cal State San Marcos

Grant Provides Path to Nursing for American Indian Students at Cal State San Marcos

Five American Indian students are attending the California State University (Cal State) San Marcos School of Nursing through a recently awarded grant called Graduating American Indians into Nursing (GAIN). The grant covers tuition, books, fees, and a stipend of $1,500 per month for each student.

Dr. Deborah Morton, an assistant professor of public health and co-principal investigator on the grant identified the potential students for the program. Dr. Denise Boren, co-principal investigator and director of the Cal State San Marcos School of Nursing will step down from her director role at the end of the academic year to focus on grants and more direct involvement with GAIN students.

Dr. Boren tells News.CSUSM.edu: “Nurses spend so much time with patients. It’s really important to have nurses who understand the American Indian culture.” This is one of the reasons for the grant, helping provide American Indian students with a path to pursue a nursing degree and improve healthcare for American Indians as these students graduate into the profession. Dr. Morton also commented on the benefits of the grant: “We have a nursing shortage in California and we have more American Indians than any other state. It was a great opportunity for us.”

One of the requirements of the grant is that students spend an equal amount of time working in an Indian Health Service clinic upon graduation as a form of scholarship payback. This means committing three years of their time after graduation, which aligns perfectly with grant goal of helping improve healthcare for American Indians.

To learn more the GAIN grant and the American Indian recipients pursuing nursing degrees at Cal State San Marcos, visit here.

Kent State University College of Nursing Celebrates History of Diversity on 50th Anniversary

Kent State University College of Nursing Celebrates History of Diversity on 50th Anniversary

The Kent State University (KSU) College of Nursing celebrated their 50th anniversary this past Monday, Jan. 23. Gathering together the entire college of nursing, students and faculty showed up to celebrate the college’s historic past while focusing on diversity and staying on the cutting edge of technology as they move forward.

KSU President Beverly Warren and Dean of the College of Nursing, Dr. Barbara Broome, both attended the celebration to give speeches about their experiences in nursing and predictions for the future of healthcare. According to KentWired.com, President Warren emphasized the importance of diversity with a snippet from her past: “In my generation, I was told, as a female, you can either teach or be a nurse. 50 years later, I’m proud to say you have so many options before you. Whether you’re male, female, transgender, no matter how you identify yourself, there is a career for you in nursing.”

Both nursing leaders gave recognition to their students who they said are a legacy of bright new ideas. Nursing isn’t just a women’s profession anymore and students love Kent’s approach to diversity and drive to break stereotypes of what defines the typical nurse. Dr. Broome summed up diversity simply:

“Inclusiveness means males, females, different races, ethnic groups, religious beliefs and lifestyles, and I think that nursing should be a lot more inclusive than it has been…It’s for anyone who has a desire to make an impact and change things.”

Looking to the future, President Warren hopes for more nursing specialties and to bring state-of-the-art technology to Kent because she believes technology drives healthcare. Kent’s nursing leaders embody the college’s values and have no plans of letting up. They’re striving for graduates who impact their communities and beyond by staying at the cutting edge of nursing.

Nursing Students from Pennsylvania College of Technology Participate in Study Abroad Course at Guatemala Medical Clinic

Nursing Students from Pennsylvania College of Technology Participate in Study Abroad Course at Guatemala Medical Clinic

After learning about cultural diversity by reading a nursing textbook, five nursing students from Pennsylvania College of Technology got to go out and experience diversity firsthand. Participating in a study abroad course, students traveled to the small town of Nueva Santa Rosa, Guatemala to treat patients in a medical clinic for seven days.

The Penn College students were led by Christine B. Kavanagh, the instructor of nursing programs, and accompanied by a larger volunteer group from Glens Falls Medical Mission. Glens Falls is based in New York and leads weekly trips to the small Guatemala community twice a year to help patients who live two hours away from the nearest hospital.

During their weeklong stint at the medical clinic, the group of volunteers saw over 1,300 patients by communicating through translators. They practiced in five clinical areas including triage, dental, pediatrics, women’s health, and general medicine, providing basic screenings, treatments, medical education, fluoride for dental care, and referrals to outside specialists when needed. Students were amazed by the positivity exuded by their patients who experience a wide variety of issues, not just medical.

Penn College offers a variety of study abroad courses, but this was the first time nursing students participated in a trip. After a successful mission, they hope to offer the course and service trip to nursing students every fall. In addition to the nursing trip, Penn College also offers a course in providing dental hygiene education in the Dominican Republic.