Georgia Southern University School of Nursing Receives $1.6 Million Grant for Behavioral Health Workforce Education

Georgia Southern University School of Nursing Receives $1.6 Million Grant for Behavioral Health Workforce Education

The Georgia Southern University (GSU) School of Nursing recently received a $1.6 million grant to help better prepare students to work in the psychiatric/mental health care field through the new Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training (BHWET) Program.

The BHWET Program supports students in the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) specialty track of the BSN-DNP program, and aims to develop and expand the behavioral health workforce, increasing the number of providers prepared to deliver team-based psychiatric and mental health services to rural and medically underserved populations in South Georgia.

Melissa Garno, EdD, RN, professor, BSN program director, PMHNP project director, and the BHWET grant principal investigator, tells News.GeorgiaSouthern.edu, “Primary care providers continue to be the most common portal of entry into our healthcare system. Area mental health providers are few, and mental health needs currently overwhelm area primary care settings, emergency rooms and communities. This program will provide support over the next four years for the education of psychiatric/mental health nurse practitioner students in settings practicing an integrated model of mental health and primary care using a team approach.”

The program will help provide stipends for BSN-DNP students choosing the PMHNP specialty track which places them in facilities based on providing interprofessional and team-based care, including primary care services. Clinical placements through qualified agencies also helps assist in closing the gap in access to mental health services across the state.

To learn more about GSU’s grant for behavioral health workforce education, visit here.

Georgia Southern University School of Nursing Receives $1.3 Million Grant

Georgia Southern University School of Nursing Receives $1.3 Million Grant

Georgia Southern University’s School of Nursing recently received a $1.3 million federal grant to help train nurse practitioner students to work in five health center organizations in southeastern Georgia. The program is called The Advanced Nursing Education Workforce (ANEW) and is funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration.

The ANEW program is intended to “support efforts to prepare advanced-practice nursing students to practice in rural and underserved settings through academic and clinical training.” Registered nurses who are working toward advanced nurse-practitioner degrees at Georgia Southern will work with five Federally Qualified Health Centers during their required clinical practicums for three to six months.

Sharon G. Radzyminski, PhD, RN, chair of Georgia Southern’s School of Nursing, tells StatesboroughHerald.com:

“If [the students] accept the traineeship money and do their practicum in one of these places, the hope is, and we would strongly encourage students to consider, working in one of these health clinics after they graduate. These clinics work with rural and underserved populations, and they are in need of primary care practitioners.”

With the grant, the academic-practice partnership between the Georgia Southern School of Nursing and the five health centers will help increase the number and readiness of Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) and Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) graduates to care for rural and underserved populations. To learn more about the ANEW project, visit here.

Georgia College School of Nursing Awarded $350,000 HRSA Grant to Fund Family Nurse Practitioner Program

Georgia College School of Nursing Awarded $350,000 HRSA Grant to Fund Family Nurse Practitioner Program

Through a grant provided by the US Department of Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship (AENT), the Georgia College (GC) School of Nursing received $350,000 to fund nurses in their final year of the Family Nurse Practitioner program.

GC’s Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) program is a master of nursing degree, and the school of nursing will benefit from help with tuition, fees, books, and a stipend to each student in their final year of the program. Many students work full time while also going to school, so Dr. Sallie Coke, director of graduate nursing programs, co-wrote the grant with Dr. Debby MacMillan to help make graduate degrees more affordable for master’s level nursing students.

The grant will help make a big difference for healthcare in Georgia, which is listed as a top state facing severe physician shortages. According to the United Health Foundation, Georgia was also listed in the bottom third for overall health at number 40 in 2015 rankings. AENT grants are usually provided for health care education in underserved areas of the country, and GC’s Family Nurse Practitioner program falls under that category.

Covering all 34 students in the 2017 FNP graduating class, the AENT grant will help offset the costs to students and their families so that they can afford to pursue advanced degrees. The GC School of Nursing intends to address nursing shortages and poor health by educating more advanced nurse practitioners and providing them with incentives to work in rural and underserved areas after graduating. Students who accept the funding from the AENT grant are required to complete two years of service in high-needs or rural health districts throughout Georgia.

Emory University Nursing Professor to Be Inducted as Fellow of the National League for Nursing

Emory University Nursing Professor to Be Inducted as Fellow of the National League for Nursing

Dr. Angela Amar, PhD, RN, FAAN, Assistant Dean for BSN education at the Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing has been chosen as a Fellow of the National League for Nursing’s (NLN) prestigious Academy of Nursing Education. She has been selected for her sustained and significant contributions to nursing education.

Dr. Amar is an advanced practice psychiatric nurse. She joined the Emory School of Nursing faculty in 2012 and has since been lauded for her innovative teaching strategies, faculty development, academic leadership, and collaborative educational and community partnerships. Her research focuses on forensic nursing and mental health responses to trauma, which has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She fosters diversity in nursing leadership through the School of Nursing’s Bridges to the Baccalaureate and Building Nursing’s Diverse Leaders at Emory (BUNDLE) Programs.

As an early pioneer in forensic nursing, Amar helped develop nursing curriculum to better prepare nurses to serve as a first line of defense for survivors of violence and trauma when they enter the health care system. She has helped develop course content and establish national forensic nursing education standards for the International Association of Forensic Nursing. Dr. Amar has also worked with the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) to establish the Advanced Forensic Nursing certification and co-authored an introductory forensic nursing textbook.

Prior to her work at Emory, Dr. Amar has developed forensic nursing programming for Georgetown University and Boston College. She has also worked with key stakeholders, law enforcement, social service, the Department of Public Health, and violence programs to develop an educational model for nursing schools nationwide. Dr. Amar is a Distinguished Fellow of the International Association of Forensic Nurses, a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, and a Nurse Faculty Scholar of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She was also named Nurse of the Year in Behavioral Health by the March of Dimes Georgia.

As one of 17 distinguished nurse educators selected as fellows, Dr. Amar will be integral in helping the NLN develop standards of excellence to increase the number of graduates from nursing programs nationwide. She will be inducted into the Academy of Nursing Education at the NLN Education Summit this September.

$350K Grant Awarded to Georgia College to Provide Health Care to Rural and Underserved Communities

$350K Grant Awarded to Georgia College to Provide Health Care to Rural and Underserved Communities

Georgia is listed as one of the top states facing severe physician shortages and consistently listed in the bottom third for overall health. To address both of these factors, the Georgia College School of Nursing is working to educate more advanced nurse practitioners and encourage students to work in rural and underserved communities after graduation.

To help achieve these goals, the US Department of Health and Human Services Administration (HRSA) awarded the Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship (AENT) grant totaling $350,000 to Georgia College. The grant will go toward funding tuition, fees, books, and other expenses, as well as give a stipend to all students in the Master of Nursing in Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) program. Students who opt to receive the funds are required to fulfill a two-year obligation to serve in high-needs or rural health districts in the state of Georgia. 130 of the 159 counties in the state are classified as rural, high-needs, or both.

The grant will cover all of the 2017 graduating class of 34 students, giving them money for living expenses to offset costs to their families, allowing them to afford going back to school. Many students are grateful for the grant, allowing them to receive further education without taking out more student loans, and encouraging them to help underserved communities by using their education to give back rather than just seeking out high paying jobs.

Georgia College’s AENT Program is designed to increase the number of advanced education nurses trained to practice as primary care providers and nursing faculty to address the nurse faculty shortage that inhibits many nursing schools from educating the number of nurses needed to meet nationwide demand. By providing grant funding for traineeships to help cover education costs, more advanced nurses can receive necessary education to become nurse educators and rural healthcare providers.

Nurse of the Week: Emory Nursing Student, Haley Reid, Perseveres Through Tragedy to Become Family’s First College Graduate

Nurse of the Week: Emory Nursing Student, Haley Reid, Perseveres Through Tragedy to Become Family’s First College Graduate

Haley Reid’s academic accomplishments gave pride to her whole family after she was accepted into the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory University and became the first in her family to go to college. However, her journey toward becoming a nurse was far from easy after her father unexpectedly passed away two weeks before she started nursing school. She also pushed through financial hardship caused by her father’s death, including the loss of her childhood home, and a year later her mother was diagnosed with cancer at a routine checkup.

This series of personal tragedies would threaten the dreams and well-being of anyone, but Reid pushed through it all and refused to give up. She focused on her studies, attended her clinical hours, and maintained her responsibilities as a student ambassador and Alumni Office intern. On top of all of her work at school she still found ways to balance new responsibilities caring for her mom, using her nursing skills to help her mom through chemotherapy while she completed her senior practicum in the emergency department at Saint Joseph’s Hospital. 

Reid has a lot to celebrate this year as she prepares to graduate with honors from Emory’s School of Nursing. She has also been accepted into Emory’s Family Nurse Practitioner master’s degree program, and will be celebrating with her mom who is now healthy and cancer-free. After completing the nurse practitioner program, Reid hopes to work in rural and underserved communities where she can strengthen her Spanish background and work in a mostly Spanish community. She also has a love for emergency medicine and hopes that if she practices in a rural setting she will see more emergency and trauma experience as a family nurse practitioner than she would get in a big city like Atlanta. In an interview for Emory, Reid made a point of wanting future students and nurses to trust the process, something she didn’t always do as a student, but it’s what got her to where she is today.

Haley Reid is also our most recent Nurse of the Week.