UM-Flint School of Nursing Receives $1.2 Million Grant to Increase Rural Health Care Providers

UM-Flint School of Nursing Receives $1.2 Million Grant to Increase Rural Health Care Providers

The University of Michigan-Flint (UM-Flint) recently received a $1.2 million Advanced Nursing Education Workforce grant to help prepare nurse practitioners to care for patients in underserved and rural areas. The grant will also help the School of Nursing develop and evaluate partnerships with rural medical clinics and centers.

Over the next two years, 30 nurse practitioner students will be selected to take part in the grant and receive specialized education on how to care for rural populations. The financial support provided by the grant will allow these students to complete clinical placements in rural areas of Michigan and increase the pipeline of health care providers for these populations.

Margaret Andrews, Interim Dean of the School of Nursing, tells News.UMFlint.edu, “Nurse practitioners serving rural communities provide many preventative services, detect and treat illnesses, increase life expectancy of rural residents, and improve the overall health and quality of life for rural communities. UM-Flint is pleased to partner with existing physicians and nurse practitioner practices in Michigan’s rural areas to educate and train the next generation of nurse practitioners to serve the needs of rural communities in Michigan.”

To learn more about UM-Flint’s Advanced Nursing Education Workforce grant and efforts to increase the number of nurse practitioners trained to serve in rural areas, visit here.

University of Michigan-Flint to Launch Doctoral Program in Nurse Anesthesia

University of Michigan-Flint to Launch Doctoral Program in Nurse Anesthesia

The University of Michigan-Flint (UM-Flint) recently announced that it will be introducing a new Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice (DNAP) degree set to start in Fall 2018. This new degree program will be part of UM-Flint’s School of Health Professions and Studies (SHPS) and will replace the existing Master of Science in Anesthesia program.

DNAP is a three-year program, designed to allow students to continue in their current nursing jobs for the first year. This program will prepare doctorate level nurse anesthetists to become excellent clinical practitioners and prepare students to embrace broader roles within health care.

Dr. Donna Fry, Dean of the School of Health Professions and Studies, tells News.UMFlint.edu:

“Advancing the nurse anesthetist program from the master’s to doctoral level will provide more educational time with students, ensuring they are well educated in contemporary anesthesia practice.”

The current anesthesia program at UM-Flint is an educational leader and innovator in the field. It became the first fully accredited clinical doctorate nurse anesthesia completion program in the state of Michigan in 2011, and awarded the state’s first Doctor of Anesthesia Practice (DrAP) degree in 2013.

The Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice degree is for professionals who are already certified registered nurse anesthetists but who want to advance their skillsets and prepare for expanded leadership roles and teaching roles. Students also have the option to earn their degree in conjunction with a Master of Business Administration for those interested in health care administration roles. Program curriculum includes a range of healthcare education and training in health policy, teaching, research, and finance.

UM-Flint will be accepting 20 to 25 new students to join the program every academic year. To learn more about the new Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice degree program, visit here.

University of Michigan-Flint School of Nursing Announces Expansion of Undergraduate Programs

University of Michigan-Flint School of Nursing Announces Expansion of Undergraduate Programs

The University of Michigan-Flint (UM-Flint) School of Nursing has announced a major expansion of its pre-licensure undergraduate nursing programs to allow for more students, faculty, and community contributions.

UM-Flint’s nursing program offers traditional and accelerated second degree Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs for students who do not already hold a Registered Nurse (RN) license. Students eligible for the accelerated second degree program include those who hold a previous non-nursing bachelor’s degree and veterans who have significant healthcare work experience in the military. As part of the expansion, UM-Flint received approval from the Michigan Board of Nursing to increase the number of students in the BSN programs from 120 to 176 starting in January 2018.

Megan Keiser, Interim Director of Undergraduate Nursing Affairs, tells News.UMFLint.edu, “Both of these programs are in high demand, with more than 350 pre-nursing majors seeking admission to one of the coveted seats in these programs.”

The expansion of the undergraduate nursing programs is also expected to attract a diverse student and faculty population. UM-Flint wants a diverse nursing population who will work and live in the local community and contribute to the local economy upon graduating. Students are encouraged to volunteer at area health screenings, health fairs, food banks, lead screenings, and water distribution sites, as well as internationally where their help is needed.

An expansion of UM-Flint’s nursing program will increase the number of nursing students available to serve the local community. To learn more about the planned nursing program expansion, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Three Generations of Women from the Harms Family Have Worked as Obstetrics Nurses at Same Hospital

Nurse of the Week: Three Generations of Women from the Harms Family Have Worked as Obstetrics Nurses at Same Hospital

Our Nurses of the Week are the three generations of Harms women who have all worked as obstetrics nurses. Christina Harms is a labor and delivery nurse at Spectrum Health Medical Center in Grand Rapids, MI where her mother, Sue Hoekstra, 56, works on the same floor. Christina’s grandmother, Mary Lou Wilkins, 86, was also a nurse at the same hospital. The three women estimate that they’ve helped care for over 10,000 babies over the course of their careers.

“It is so incredible that all three of us have helped build so many families and we have such a passion for these moms and their babies. We love taking care of them.”

Harms fondly tells People.com, “It just goes from generation to generation.” As the mother of two little boys, Harms didn’t always plan on following in her family’s footsteps. She went to college for a music degree but later realized that she had the same passion as her mother and grandmother. She decided to go back to school to become a nurse and has been working in obstetrics for the past four years.

After working night shifts in the labor and delivery unit, Harms often passes off patients to her mom who works day shifts in postpartum. Wilkins, who retired in 1991, says she also shared several patients with Hoekstra over the years. Now Wilkins watches her grandchildren during the day when Harms gets home from working night shifts.

Wilkins knows what it’s like to be a mother and nurse after juggling raising three kids while she worked night shifts at the hospital early on in her career. She became a nurse in 1962 and spent 28 years helping moms deliver their babies. She still remembers how special each individual case was.

All three of these women share in the knowledge of knowing how special it is they all fell in love with the same career path, caring for mothers and babies. When Hoekstra and Wilkins flew to Colorado for Harms’ graduation, they both said they couldn’t have been prouder. Harms shares in the pride, telling ABCNews.com, “It is so incredible that all three of us have helped build so many families and we have such a passion for these moms and their babies. We love taking care of them.”

Nurse of the Week: Bride-to-Be Lauren Wirwille Saves Unconscious Man on Her Way to Bridal Shower

Nurse of the Week: Bride-to-Be Lauren Wirwille Saves Unconscious Man on Her Way to Bridal Shower

Our Nurse of the Week is Lauren Wirwille, bride-to-be, who was driving to her own bridal shower with her mom in the front seat when she noticed a minivan stopped in front of her. She decided to honk, prompting the car to start moving again, but after Wirwille turned at the intersection her mom saw the van veer off the road. Realizing that the man had looked slumped over, Wirwille pulled over and ran toward the man’s car where she found him unconscious.

As an emergency room nurse for St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Green Oak Township, MI, Wirwille knew exactly what to do to help the man who had gone blue in the face. She was already running late to her bridal shower but couldn’t help pulling over to help a stranger, and she quickly realized it was a good thing she had followed her instincts.

After instructing her mother to call 911, Wirwille began trying to find the man’s pulse. At the same time, another driver pulled over and offered to help get the man out of his vehicle. Then Wirwille immediately started CPR. She recalled the event to ABCNews.go.com, explaining that, “Not a lot of people know how to do chest compressions. After a little while, you do get tired, and you need to not be tired, so I had my mom start chest compressions. She did great. I was so proud of her.”

Shortly after starting CPR, Fire Chief Kevin Gentry arrived on the scene and assisted in performing chest compressions. The EMS crew was able to revive the man and transport him to Providence Hospital where they believe the man was recovering but weren’t able to retrieve any details.

Wirwille ended up being an hour late to her bridal shower, but she was welcomed with open arms and applauded for her heroic actions. She didn’t regret being late to her shower; she was simply humbled by the experience and happy she was able to help somebody through an emergency situation.

Nurse of the Week: Shihan Huang, University of Michigan Nursing Senior and Liver Transplant Patient, Gives Back

Nurse of the Week: Shihan Huang, University of Michigan Nursing Senior and Liver Transplant Patient, Gives Back

Our Nurse of the Week is Shihan Huang, a senior nursing student at the University of Michigan who was born with biliary atresia, a liver condition that gave her a slim chance of survival. She needed a liver transplant, but was born in Taiwan at a time when most hospitals in the country didn’t have the capacity to perform infant transplants. However, her parents relocated to Ann Arbor, MI a few months later where Huang remained on the transplant list for over a year.

Then just two days after her second birthday, Huang’s parents received a call that there was a liver available. Michigan Medicine nurse, Vicki Shieck, cared for Huang following her transplant and she still remembers those early days treating Huang. Her surgery was a success, and now all grown up, Huang is pursuing a nursing degree at the University of Michigan.

Huang is a thriving young woman, but her condition requires lifelong maintenance and monitoring. Shieck tells Nursing.UMich.edu, “Just like any young adult who had a liver transplant as an infant, Shihan had some transition hurdles to overcome in learning how to manage her chronic illness. Many of my kids her age don’t overcome those hurdles and it leads to non-adherence, chronic rejection and unfortunately, death.”

Huang credits Shieck for encouraging her throughout her treatment and as an adult pursuing a career in nursing that will allow her to support other children facing similar challenges. She explains her career choice, saying “I’ve been in the hospital so much and I know what it feels like to be sick and feeling terrible. Nursing is my way of giving back. The health care profession did a lot for me so I want to be able to give back.”

Huang is now preparing for her graduation ceremony. She plans to work for a few years before returning to graduate school after she has decided on a specialty area. To learn more about senior nursing student Shihan Huang and the many ways she’s giving back to the field of nursing, visit here.