Grand Valley State University Creates Student Nurse Mentorship Program

Grand Valley State University Creates Student Nurse Mentorship Program

To help combat the stress of nursing school, the Student Nurses’ Association (SNA) at Grand Valley State University (GVSU) created a Transitions Mentorship Program which is in its third semester. The student-run organization immerses GVSU nursing students into the medical world through presentations, group meetings, and hands-on activities.

Jamie Platt, president of the GVSU SNA chapter, tells Lanthorn.com, “The idea behind the program is to empower our new student nurses. SNA believes that creating a strong environment through positive peer-student relationships during the beginning of nursing school will allow new students to feel confident during a vulnerable time in the nursing program.”

The Transitions program pairs lower-level nursing students with upper-level students so they can meet and discuss topics in their major and receive tips for studying for nursing exams. It offers students someone to lean on while studying in an intensive program.

GVSU’s student nurse association decided to incorporate the mentorship program based on student feedback. Many older nursing students reported the struggles they went through and wished they had had someone to help them through the program. GVSU’s nursing program is comprised of five semesters, so students in their first or second semester are paired with a student in their third, fourth, or fifth semester.

Students in the mentorship program are required to meet five times per semester and are encouraged to meet biweekly. After meeting, the mentors report back on their conversations, many of which have revolved around clinical work which makes up half of the students’ time so that they can practice skills they learn in the classroom.

The program has received positive feedback thus far, making a positive impact on students. Many students feel the mentorship program helps them feel more confident and less apprehensive about future semesters. To learn more about GVSU’s student nurse mentorship program, visit here.

Western Michigan University School of Nursing Awarded $2 Million to Increase Cultural Diversity

Western Michigan University School of Nursing Awarded $2 Million to Increase Cultural Diversity

The Western Michigan University (WMU) Bronson School of Nursing has received a $2 million grant to provide scholarships to students from different cultural backgrounds to cultivate a more diverse field of nurses.

The Michigan Center for Nursing reports 80 percent of nursing students in Michigan are white, compared to 15.3 percent of enrollees reporting a race other than white. Now, WMU hopes to change that statistic thanks to the $2 million grant.

Funded by the US Health Resources and Services Administration in the form of a four-year grant, WMU has created a new program called “Empower Success.” The grant money will provide nursing students with scholarships and give those from diverse cultural backgrounds additional support. The program will also establish student mentors for those who need extra help getting accustomed to cultural differences in the United States. This will include the creation of student care plans to ensure that students have what they need to be successful.

The goal of “Empower Success” is to increase diversity in WMU’s Bronson School of Nursing by 60 percent, ensuring that nurses in their community represent the entire population. Program director and Bronson School of Nursing professor Dr. Mary Ann Stark tells WWMT.com, “In order to be efficient with what you’re doing, you need people who are from other parts of the universe. If they are part of the nursing workforce we have a better nursing workforce. It’s going to improve healthcare for everyone.”

To learn more about WMU’s grant to increase cultural diversity in nursing, visit here.

Michigan State University College of Nursing Begins Program to Fight Human Trafficking

Michigan State University College of Nursing Begins Program to Fight Human Trafficking

Michigan State University’s (MSU) College of Nursing has taken a step toward increasing reporting and minimizing human trafficking by creating a training program to teach students about this serious public health issue. According to the National Human Trafficking Hotline, 943 human trafficking cases have been reported in the state of Michigan from 2007 to 2017. The Health Law Center has announced that human trafficking has reached an alarming level in the US.

MSU Professional Program Coordinator Kathy Forrest tells StateNews.com, “Human trafficking is very prevalent in the United States. It is a form of human slavery, human bondage. It’s a public health issue for the individuals who are being trafficked. It is often an underground activity that is spread by social media and affects the vulnerable among us.”

StateNews.com cites that 138 individuals in the MSU College of Nursing have completed the online course for human trafficking which requires professionals to take the training to get or renew a new license or registration. Professionals who are required to satisfy the trainings include nurses, counselors, physicians, social workers, and massage therapists. The training includes learning the types and venues of human trafficking in the US and in Michigan, how to identify victims in health care settings, how to identify warning signs, and what resources are available for reporting.

MSU Clinical Associate Professor of Osteopathic Specialties Alan Janssen wants to increase awareness of the public health issue and educate nurses and other healthcare professionals on how to address the problem. He also hopes that increased awareness will lead to better treatment resources.

To learn more about MSU’s online course on human trafficking and steps to begin combatting this dangerous issue, visit here.

UM-Flint School of Nursing Receives $1.2 Million Grant to Increase Rural Health Care Providers

UM-Flint School of Nursing Receives $1.2 Million Grant to Increase Rural Health Care Providers

The University of Michigan-Flint (UM-Flint) recently received a $1.2 million Advanced Nursing Education Workforce grant to help prepare nurse practitioners to care for patients in underserved and rural areas. The grant will also help the School of Nursing develop and evaluate partnerships with rural medical clinics and centers.

Over the next two years, 30 nurse practitioner students will be selected to take part in the grant and receive specialized education on how to care for rural populations. The financial support provided by the grant will allow these students to complete clinical placements in rural areas of Michigan and increase the pipeline of health care providers for these populations.

Margaret Andrews, Interim Dean of the School of Nursing, tells News.UMFlint.edu, “Nurse practitioners serving rural communities provide many preventative services, detect and treat illnesses, increase life expectancy of rural residents, and improve the overall health and quality of life for rural communities. UM-Flint is pleased to partner with existing physicians and nurse practitioner practices in Michigan’s rural areas to educate and train the next generation of nurse practitioners to serve the needs of rural communities in Michigan.”

To learn more about UM-Flint’s Advanced Nursing Education Workforce grant and efforts to increase the number of nurse practitioners trained to serve in rural areas, visit here.

University of Michigan-Flint to Launch Doctoral Program in Nurse Anesthesia

University of Michigan-Flint to Launch Doctoral Program in Nurse Anesthesia

The University of Michigan-Flint (UM-Flint) recently announced that it will be introducing a new Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice (DNAP) degree set to start in Fall 2018. This new degree program will be part of UM-Flint’s School of Health Professions and Studies (SHPS) and will replace the existing Master of Science in Anesthesia program.

DNAP is a three-year program, designed to allow students to continue in their current nursing jobs for the first year. This program will prepare doctorate level nurse anesthetists to become excellent clinical practitioners and prepare students to embrace broader roles within health care.

Dr. Donna Fry, Dean of the School of Health Professions and Studies, tells News.UMFlint.edu:

“Advancing the nurse anesthetist program from the master’s to doctoral level will provide more educational time with students, ensuring they are well educated in contemporary anesthesia practice.”

The current anesthesia program at UM-Flint is an educational leader and innovator in the field. It became the first fully accredited clinical doctorate nurse anesthesia completion program in the state of Michigan in 2011, and awarded the state’s first Doctor of Anesthesia Practice (DrAP) degree in 2013.

The Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice degree is for professionals who are already certified registered nurse anesthetists but who want to advance their skillsets and prepare for expanded leadership roles and teaching roles. Students also have the option to earn their degree in conjunction with a Master of Business Administration for those interested in health care administration roles. Program curriculum includes a range of healthcare education and training in health policy, teaching, research, and finance.

UM-Flint will be accepting 20 to 25 new students to join the program every academic year. To learn more about the new Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice degree program, visit here.

University of Michigan-Flint School of Nursing Announces Expansion of Undergraduate Programs

University of Michigan-Flint School of Nursing Announces Expansion of Undergraduate Programs

The University of Michigan-Flint (UM-Flint) School of Nursing has announced a major expansion of its pre-licensure undergraduate nursing programs to allow for more students, faculty, and community contributions.

UM-Flint’s nursing program offers traditional and accelerated second degree Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs for students who do not already hold a Registered Nurse (RN) license. Students eligible for the accelerated second degree program include those who hold a previous non-nursing bachelor’s degree and veterans who have significant healthcare work experience in the military. As part of the expansion, UM-Flint received approval from the Michigan Board of Nursing to increase the number of students in the BSN programs from 120 to 176 starting in January 2018.

Megan Keiser, Interim Director of Undergraduate Nursing Affairs, tells News.UMFLint.edu, “Both of these programs are in high demand, with more than 350 pre-nursing majors seeking admission to one of the coveted seats in these programs.”

The expansion of the undergraduate nursing programs is also expected to attract a diverse student and faculty population. UM-Flint wants a diverse nursing population who will work and live in the local community and contribute to the local economy upon graduating. Students are encouraged to volunteer at area health screenings, health fairs, food banks, lead screenings, and water distribution sites, as well as internationally where their help is needed.

An expansion of UM-Flint’s nursing program will increase the number of nursing students available to serve the local community. To learn more about the planned nursing program expansion, visit here.