Naomi Jones Receives ATI Nursing Education’s Nurse’s Touch Award

Naomi Jones Receives ATI Nursing Education’s Nurse’s Touch Award

Naomi Jones, the department chair for the practical nursing program at Ivy Tech Community College, was one of four nurses in the nation to receive ATI Nursing Education’s Nurse’s Touch Award. 800 applications were received, and Jones’ teaching techniques really stood out amongst the other applicants.

Referring to the Nurse’s Touch Award, Jones tells TheHeraldBulletin.com, “I’m really humbled. I feel it’s really a privilege for me to teach my passion. I’m really happy for Ivy Tech. We have a really awesome program here.”

For Jones, being a teacher offers the best of both worlds in nursing. After earning her BSN in 2000 from Ball State University, Jones became a parish nurse which allowed her to use a holistic approach to health within a faith-based community. Holistic nursing taught her the bedside manner she works hard to convey to students. Every lecture Jones teaches touches on patients and care.

Jones’ years as a nurse at the bedside brought her a passion for cardiac and respiratory patients before she pursued her love of teaching. After working as a clinical nurse for over a decade, she went back to school to earn her Master’s Degree in Nursing Education at Walden University in 2014. While in school, she came to Ivy Tech as an assistant nursing instructor in 2010 and worked her way up to department chair this year.

Naomi now credits her success to her family, including her husband and two daughters who have provided a support system while she earned her master’s degree and became a nurse educator, as well as her sister who earned her nursing degree at Ivy Tech, and her mom who was a preschool and elementary school teacher. Jones says, “I don’t feel that you ever get to a certain place or get recognition without people along the path…My love of teaching probably came from [my mother].”

The ATI Nursing Education’s Nurse’s Touch Award is intended to improve interpersonal communication between nurses and their patients. To learn more about ATI and their recent award recipient Naomi Jones, visit here.

Elms College School of Nursing Adds New Graduate Programs to Meet Mass. School Nurse Needs

Elms College School of Nursing Adds New Graduate Programs to Meet Mass. School Nurse Needs

The Elms College School of Nursing in Chicopee, Mass. recently announced a new Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree and graduate certificate in school nursing program to help expand opportunities for school nurses to meet state education requirements. Massachusetts school nurses are required to earn board certification in school nursing or their MSN degree within five years of employment and currently there is only one graduate program in New England that focuses on school nursing.

School nurses see large numbers of students with a wide array of needs, sometimes spread over several schools as our country faces a shortage of nurses, especially in schools. They must be able to assess; diagnose; identify outcomes; plan, implement, and coordinate care; and teach healthy practices to their students while working with several other healthcare professionals when needed from physicians to counselors to classroom aides.

The school nurse track offered at Elms will be comprised of MSN curriculum components, with a focus on school nursing that includes core graduate nursing classes, direct-care courses, school nurse professional standards, technology and informatics, and school nurse practicums. The school nurse certificate won’t fulfill state board-certification requirements, but it benefits nurses with a graduate degree in another discipline who want to improve their school nursing knowledge base.

All BSN nurses at Elms College will be eligible to enroll in the school nursing graduate certificate which consists of 12 credits and three class options: classroom attendance, livestream, or archived videos. The first group of students enrolled in the graduate core classes will begin in Fall 2017, and school nursing functional content courses will roll out in Spring 2018.

University of Texas at Arlington Adds Five Graduate Nursing Degrees to Online Catalog

University of Texas at Arlington Adds Five Graduate Nursing Degrees to Online Catalog

The University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) College of Nursing and Health Innovation recently added five new nursing graduate degrees to its online catalog for the spring semester. The new online programs include a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree and four nurse practitioner master’s degrees in pediatric primary care, pediatric acute care, adult gerontology acute care, and adult gerontology primary care.

After drastically increased enrollment from UTA’s master of science in nursing (MSN) education and nursing administration courses were offered in an online format, the university decided to further expand its online nursing degrees. The additional online degrees will provide advanced nursing education access to students who are unable to attend on-campus courses.

The new online DNP program provides advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) with the information, knowledge, and skills to transform healthcare from the local to global level. With an online learning system that doesn’t require specific class times, the program’s goal is to provide the rigorous standards of a DNP program in a flexible and affordable way for professional working nurses.

Adding new online programs supports UTA’s mission to improve health and human condition by making advanced nursing programs more available so that UTA students can have a broader impact on the health and lives of people in their own state, country, and around the world. To learn more about UTA’s new online nursing programs, visit TheShorthorn.com.

$5 Million Gift to University of Virginia School of Nursing Offers Scholarship Support to Non-Nurses Entering the Profession

$5 Million Gift to University of Virginia School of Nursing Offers Scholarship Support to Non-Nurses Entering the Profession

A $5 million gift from Joanne and Bill Conway will go towards supporting the University of Virginia’s (UVA) fast-track-to-nursing program for non-nurses entering the profession. Their gift will go into effect in 2018, extending a gift bestowed in 2013 and furthering the couple’s support of the UVA School of Nursing.

The Conway’s contributions to UVA have helped diversify the nursing student body by bringing a particular focus to students from underrepresented and minority groups, including men. Their newest gift is expected to provide scholarships to over 110 new nurses over five years, bringing new skills and experience from outside nursing to the bedside. School of Nursing Dean, Dorrie K. Fontaine, told UVAToday,

“The Conways are forging real, meaningful change in nursing because they’re bringing even more people to nursing who look like, talk like, and understand the patients they serve.”

New funding from the Conway’s is coming at a monumental moment for UVA as they celebrate the 10th year of their first Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) master’s program. The program was the first of its kind in Virginia, providing a path to nursing for non-nurses who hold a bachelor’s degree or higher in another field. Students in the fast-track-to-nursing program spend two years attending intensive academic courses before starting clinical rotations with a personal veteran nurse preceptor.

Graduating with over 1,000 hours of clinical experience, CNLs graduate as entry-level nurses but usually rise quickly into leadership and management positions due to their maturity level and diversified experience. To learn more about UVA’s CNL program and the Conway’s philanthropic gifts, visit here.

Rasmussen College Expands Master of Science in Nursing Program to North Dakota and Wisconsin

Rasmussen College Expands Master of Science in Nursing Program to North Dakota and Wisconsin

After launching their first Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program in October 2016, Rasmussen College announced yesterday that enrollment is now open for its MSN program in North Dakota and Wisconsin for classes beginning in April. Excited to expand their MSN program to two new states where demand for master’s educated nurses is increasing, Rasmussen’s MSN program is expected to help meet the need for a workforce with more nurse leaders and educators.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) reports that 70,000 qualified candidates were turned away from nursing programs in 2014 due to insufficient number of faculty. At the same time, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that occupations requiring master’s degrees will grow 18.4 percent through 2022, and 255,000 of the 448,500 jobs expected to require a master’s degree will be within the healthcare and social assistance fields.

Dr. Joan Rich, vice president of the Rasmussen College School of Nursing, reports that job postings from the past year in Wisconsin for nurses with a graduate or professional degree has increased 430 percent from five years ago, while North Dakota has experienced a 330 percent increase since 2011 according to Burning Glass. Rasmussen looks forward to helping fill new positions in these states.

Students in the MSN program can choose between two specializations, Nurse Educator or Nursing Leadership and Administration. The online MSN degree is intended for currently licensed registered nurses (RNs) with baccalaureate degrees in nursing to advance their careers by moving into advanced nursing leadership roles.

West Virginia University Introduces Hybrid Program for Graduate Nursing Students to Earn Master’s in Nursing and Business Simultaneously

West Virginia University Introduces Hybrid Program for Graduate Nursing Students to Earn Master’s in Nursing and Business Simultaneously

West Virginia University (WVU) is blending science with business in a graduate program for nurses to earn their master’s in nursing (MSN) and business (MBA) at the same time. The program is designed for nurses who are seeking leadership, public health, or entrepreneurial positions, especially in a financial setting.

Elizabeth Vitullo, Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs in the WVU School of Business and Economics, tells The State Journal that, “Health care and business have always been linked…You never want to take the human out of the health care, but there are business decisions that impact patient care. This is essential for nurses who are looking at moving into administrative roles where they will manage people and make business decisions.”

Students in the program will complete 67 credit hours for the MBA portion concurrently with their graduate nursing courses. The hybrid program will be offered entirely online with the exception of a residency portion where students will come to campus for face-to-face learning and networking. Full-time students are expected to complete the program in eight semesters or three years, but the program also accommodates full-time professionals who want to complete the program part-time.

The MSN/MBA Program at WVU begins August 2017 with the first class of full-time students scheduled to graduate in 2020. To learn more about the program, visit here.