University of Rochester School of Nursing Addresses Mental Health Needs through Distance Nurse Practitioner Program

University of Rochester School of Nursing Addresses Mental Health Needs through Distance Nurse Practitioner Program

The University of Rochester (UR) School of Nursing recently relaunched its Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program (FPMHNP) as a distance program to address critical shortages of mental health care providers in New York state and around the country.

Following a distance learning model, students in the program are able to stay at home and in their current jobs while returning to school to advance their careers. Faculty have designed the online courses to offer effective learning techniques in a personal way. Thanks to today’s technology, the program offers face-to-face contact between student and professor so students can ask questions and go over material in detail the same way on-campus students interact with their instructors.

The US Health Resources & Services Administration predicts that the need for mental health care providers will grow acute over the next decade, especially in rural areas where nurses don’t always have access to traditional graduate programs. Susan Blaakman, PhD, RN, NPP-BC, associate professor of clinical nursing and co-director of the FPMHNP program tells the UR Newsroom,

“Our aim is to reach enough students to significantly increase the number of advanced practice providers who are trained in mental health across the lifespan and can deliver care in areas that are in desperate need of these resources.”

To learn more about UR’s Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program, visit here.

Stony Brook University and Suffolk County Community College Launch Joint Admissions Nursing Program

Stony Brook University and Suffolk County Community College Launch Joint Admissions Nursing Program

The Stony Brook University School of Nursing and Suffolk County Community College, both located on Long Island, NY, recently announced they are launching the Suffolk-Stony Brook Nursing First Program. Beginning in September 2017, the new program will take on an inaugural class of 65 students who will be accepted into an Associate of Science Degree in Nursing Program at Suffolk and then be pre-selected to move directly into a Registered Nurse BSN program at Stony Brook.

Kenneth Kaushansky, MD, MACP, Senior Vice President of the Health Sciences and Dean of the Stony Brook School of Medicine, tells the Stony Brook Newsroom, “The purpose of Nursing First is to facilitate academic progression to higher levels of education in nursing. It will also help build a stronger nursing workforce on Long Island and in New York State.” Dr. Lee Anne Xippolitos, Dean of the Stony Brook University School of Nursing, explains the need for the nursing program partnership:

“Our colleagues at Suffolk do an outstanding job in preparing and diversifying our nursing workforce with the selection and training of future nurses. However, with dramatic changes in an ever-changing healthcare landscape, the need to educate nurses who are skilled at the highest levels is necessary. This program provides the students with a wonderful bridge to that education.”

Students in the program will take part in the joint nursing program which creates a pathway for students to move directly from the largest SUNY associate degree program to the best bachelor’s program in the SUNY system. With an educational model emphasizing the importance of smooth academic transition from associate to baccalaureate nursing programs, Nursing First students will be well prepared for a diverse nursing workforce and fast-paced healthcare landscape.

To learn more about the new Suffolk-Stony Brook Nursing First Program, visit here.

Binghamton University to Use $21 Million in State Funding to Relocate and Expand School of Nursing

Binghamton University to Use $21 Million in State Funding to Relocate and Expand School of Nursing

Binghamton University, located in Johnson City, NY, will use $21 million in state funding to relocate and expand the Decker School of Nursing. This project is the second phase of construction for Binghamton’s $105 million Health Sciences and Technology Innovation Park, including construction of the new $60 million School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Governor Andrew Cuomo expects the Binghamton project to result in the creation of 150 new jobs and retention of 325 existing jobs.

The Technology Innovation Park was made a priority by Cuomo in 2014 with a commitment of $10 million in capital resources to support the initial planning and development costs for the new School of Pharmacy. Binghamton’s $21 million in state funding comes from the Upstate Revitalization Initiative (URI). The funding will go toward supporting building renovations and upgrades and expanding the facility will allow the school to offer new health sciences and public health programs.

Along with the renovations, the new facilities will include clinical, educational, and community partner spaces. Renovations are to begin immediately and expected to be completed in August 2020. Once the renovations are complete, Binghamton will enroll over 430 undergraduate students and 170 graduate students in the School of Nursing. Partnering the new School of Pharmacy with the expanded School of Nursing will allow for new advanced disciplines to boost Binghamton’s reputation as a leader in higher learning and medical research.

CDC Awards $375,000 Contract to Columbia University School of Nursing to Study Infection Surveillance and Reporting in Nursing Homes

CDC Awards $375,000 Contract to Columbia University School of Nursing to Study Infection Surveillance and Reporting in Nursing Homes

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have awarded a one-year, $375,000 contract to the Columbia University School of Nursing. Under the leadership of Patricia Stone, PhD, Centennial Professor of Health Policy at Columbia, a research team will conduct a study on barriers to reporting of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) and multidrug-resistant organisms in nursing homes, and the resources needed to overcome these barriers.

Columbia’s study is one of 34 studies being funded by the CDC as part of a $14 million effort called the Antibiotic Resistance Solutions Initiative to address a growing problem of antibiotic resistance nationwide. Nursing homes are supposed to report antibiotic resistant organisms to the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), an internet-based infection tracking system created and managed by the CDC. However, according to Columbia Nursing, only 1.9 percent of the 15,700 nursing homes in the nation were enrolled in the NHSN as of March 2016.

Stone’s research team will also include co-Investigator Carolyn Herzig, PhD, associate research scientist at Columbia Nursing, and a RAND Corporation team led by Andy Dick, PhD. The CDC believes that antibiotics are life-saving medicines, but the spread of antibiotic resistance is threatening their effectiveness in the future. Columbia Nursing’s research could produce new prevention strategies to better combat antibiotic resistance by helping to identify previously under-recognized routes of transmission between patients.

According to Stone, Columbia’s study of identification and reporting of infections in nursing homes is the first step in finding more effective ways to prevent and reduce infection. Results of the study could ultimately improve nursing home resident quality of life and reduce the cost of care, greatly contributing to the CDC’s efforts to address antibiotic resistance.

NYU Names Dr. Mattia Gilmartin Executive Director of Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) Program

NYU Names Dr. Mattia Gilmartin Executive Director of Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) Program

Appointed by Dean Sullivan-Marx at the New York University (NYU) Rory Meyers College of Nursing, Dr. Mattia Gilmartin has been named Executive Director of the Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) Program. NICHE was established in 1992 as the leading nurse-driven program designed to help hospitals and healthcare organizations improve the care of older adults.

The mission of NICHE is to provide the principles and tools to stimulate change in the culture of healthcare facilities to achieve sensitive patient-centered care for all older adults over the age of 65. Based at NYU Nursing, NICHE has a network of over 680 hospitals and healthcare facilities in 46 states, Canada, Bermuda, and Singapore.

According to an NYU News Release from February 2016, the number of adults over the age of 85 is expected to nearly triple from 6.3 million in 2015 to 17.9 million in 2015, ultimately comprising 4.5% of the total population. With the needs of older adults being increasingly met outside the home, NICHE seeks to ensure that those working in long-term care facilities are educated and prepared to meet the rising demand for these services.

As Executive Director of NICHE, Dr. Gilmartin will oversee the success of new programs to engage hospitals and healthcare leaders in expanding the NICHE program. Her responsibilities will include managing the current membership model, seeking new relationships with funders, expanding the NICHE program and its offerings, and increasing resource development. In doing so, Gilmartin will fulfill her most critical goal of providing a premier healthcare model for the care of older adults.

Dr. Gilmartin’s faculty appointment at the NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing includes Senior Research Scientist and Director for the Center for Continuing Nursing Education where she manages a number of continuing education programs for practicing nurses. Before coming to NYU in 2011, Gilmartin oversaw an interdisciplinary research group at a leading international business school in France called INSEAD, and led the design and implementation of a three-semester specialty track Clinical Nurse Leader master’s degree program at the Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing in New York City.

Gimartin’s education includes a BSN, MSN, and master’s of business administration from the University of San Francisco, and a PhD from the University of Virginia. She also completed a post-doctoral fellowship in organizational improvement and comparative health systems at Cambridge University. Dr. Gilmartin currently serves as chair-elect for the Academy of Management, and Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine and National Academies of Practice.

In her new position as Executive Director of NICHE, Dr. Gilmartin will continue working with Dean Sullivan-Marx at NYU Meyers and The Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing in overseeing the continued success of the NICHE program.

Columbia University School of Nursing Holds Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Group in Washington Heights

Columbia University School of Nursing Holds Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Group in Washington Heights

The Columbia University School of Nursing held a ribbon cutting ceremony on September 14 to celebrate the opening of a new nurse practitioner primary care group in Washington Heights. Pioneering in nurse practitioner-led care, this is the second primary care practice established by Columbia’s School of Nursing, with the other practice held in Midtown Manhattan. Both facilities are completely staffed and managed by nurse practitioners, and a third practice is expected to open later this year in Morningside Heights along with a house calls practice.

Through an affiliation with ColumbiaDoctors and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia’s Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Group provides patients with access to a world-class network of specialists from the Columbia University Medical Center. The new practice will help to expand health care options for residents of Washington Heights and its surrounding neighborhoods.

Bobbie Berkowitz, Dean of Columbia University School of Nursing and Senior Vice President of Columbia University Medical Center, says the new nurse practitioner primary care group meets the growing need to prepare advanced practice nurses to deliver more complex care as people live longer with chronic diseases that are now manageable rather than fatal. The primary care nurse practitioner practice is designed to provide high-quality, comprehensive, and coordinated care to individuals and families in their communities.

Stephen Ferrara, Associate Dean of Clinical Affairs at Columbia University School of Nursing and Executive Director of the Nurse Practitioner Association of New York State also spoke out about the new nurse practitioner practice. Ferrara says that nurse practitioners focus on the whole person to help them make lifestyle choices that prevent disease and help them stay as healthy as possible. Nurse practitioners get to know each patient, their history, health goals, and challenges, and develop clear and personalized treatment plans along with the patient.

The Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Group in Washington Heights meets the diverse needs of the local community by offering integrated primary care and mental health services. Containing a series of specialized spaces intended to improve the patient experience, nurse practitioners are enabled to deliver efficient and compassionate care. In addition to seven exam rooms and three consulting rooms, the practice facility includes a multi-purpose community space for members of the community to learn about healthcare and wellness in a comfortable and welcoming environment. Services offered at the practice include preventive health, women’s health, family health, travel health, mental and behavioral health, checkups, disease management, LGBT care, illness and injury, nutrition and wellness, and vaccinations.

Nurse practitioners (NPs) are registered nurses with advanced education in the form of a Master’s degree or clinical doctorate. They are licensed to provide comprehensive care, including prescribing medications. Their role in the healthcare field helps patients make choices to prevent disease and maximize their health.