Nurse of the Week: Marie Carmel Garcon Named Nurse Practitioner of the Year by Nurse Practitioner Association New York State

Nurse of the Week: Marie Carmel Garcon Named Nurse Practitioner of the Year by Nurse Practitioner Association New York State

Our Nurse of the Week is Marie Carmel Garcon, DNP, Columbia University School of Nursing, who has been named the 2017 Nurse Practitioner of the Year by the Nurse Practitioner Association New York State (NPA). Dr. Garcon’s award aligns with National Nurse Practitioner Week 2017, taking place November 12-18.

Garcon leads the House Calls services at ColumbiaDoctors Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Group, the faculty practice of Columbia Nursing, where she provides primary care directly to Washington Heights and Inwood residents who have difficulty leaving their homes. This involves overseeing patients’ care the same way she would in a clinical setting, setting up specialty visits like X-rays and blood work in patients’ homes, and managing their overall care.

The NPA is recognizing Garcon for her outstanding commitment to providing compassionate care after serving the Columbia University Medical Center community for more than 28 years. An NPA release states:

“Dr. Garcon has extensive experience working on the front lines of intensive care and oncology units and is able to advocate for patients and their families giving voice to those who cannot speak for themselves due to illness. Among her many noteworthy accomplishments over her 20-year career as a family nurse practitioner, Dr. Garcon established a support group for patients and families affected by pancreatic cancer.”

The NPA has been recognizing a Nurse Practitioner of the Year since 1987. Garcon was presented with her award at the NPA’s 33rd Annual Conference on October 21 in Saratoga Springs, NY. To learn more about Dr. Garcon and the NPA, visit here.

Nurse Practitioner Association New York State Cites Study on Expanding Role of NPs in Providing Care

Nurse Practitioner Association New York State Cites Study on Expanding Role of NPs in Providing Care

The Nurse Practitioner Association New York State (NPA) recently cited a new study outlining the increasing number and influence of nurse practitioners in the state in celebration of National Nurse Practitioner Week 2017, November 12-18.

Stephen Ferrara, DNP, FNP, FAANP, Associate Dean of Clinical Affairs at Columbia School of Nursing and Executive Director of The NPA, stated in a press release, “Nurse Practitioners focus not only on diagnosing and managing acute and chronic illnesses, but also on integrating evidence based practice, health promotion, disease prevention, and patient education to help patients understand their complete health picture. We thank SUNY Albany’s School of Public Health for their study highlighting the professional credentials and expanding role of NPs as vital providers of health care to people throughout New York State.”

The study, titled “A Profile of New York State Nurse Practitioners, 2017,” was conducted by the Center for Health Workforce Studies at SUNY Albany’s School of Public Health. Key elements of the study included:

  • Approximately 13,000 active NPs are practicing in New York State
  • More than 90% of active NPs report holding a master’s degree or post-master’s certificate as their highest NP degree
  • The vast majority of NPs report a certification in a primary care specialty; nine percent of NPs report a certification in psychiatry
  • Just over half of NPs work in health centers, clinics, and hospital outpatient departments, while another 18% work in physician offices
  • More NPs per 100,000 population work in urban areas than in rural areas of the state
  • NPs in rural areas are more likely to provide primary care or psychiatric services than their urban counterparts
  • Forty-three percent of NPs in the state work in federally designated primary care health professional shortage areas (HPSAs)
  • Nearly 70% of NPs in rural areas work in primary care HPSAs, compared with 39% of NPs in urban areas

According to NPA, there are approximately 234,000 nurse practitioners in the United States, with an additional 23,000 NP students graduating each year. National Nurse Practitioner Week is intended to emphasize the importance of removing outdated barriers to practice so that NPs will be allowed to practice to to the full extent of their experience and education.

To learn more about National Nurse Practitioner Week and Nurse Practitioner Association New York State, visit here.

Nurse Practitioner Association New York State Awards Nurse Practitioner of the Year

Nurse Practitioner Association New York State Awards Nurse Practitioner of the Year

As National Nurse Practitioner Week 2017 approaches (November 12-18), the Nurse Practitioner Association New York State (NPA) has named a new Nurse Practitioner of the Year and Nurse Practitioner Student of the Year. The awards were presented on Oct. 21 at NPA’s 33rd Annual Conference.

Marie Carmel Garcon, DNP, FNP-C, of Columbia University School of Nursing/ColumbiaDoctors Nurse Practitioner Group has been named Nurse Practitioner of the Year for her extensive experience working on the front lines of intensive care and oncology units. With a 20-year career as a family nurse practitioner, Garcon has been an advocate for patients and their families, giving a voice to who those who are unable to speak for themselves due to an illness.

Darcie Morgan, BSN, RN, CPN, who is enrolled in the Masters NP Program at the University of Rochester, has been named Nurse Practitioner Student of the Year. Morgan was recognized for being a role model to other nurse practitioner students and for her commitment to the community. Morgan is especially interested in the promotion of vaccines for all children. Her interest began while working as a school nurse where she noticed that primary care providers do not always promote universal vaccination. Now she is active in dispelling myths about vaccine risks.

Stephen Ferrara, DNP, FNP, FAANP, Associate Dean of Clinical Affairs at Columbia University School of Nursing and Executive Director of the NPA stated in a press release, “As National Nurse Practitioner Week 2017 approaches, what better time is there to acknowledge and celebrate the Nurse Practitioner commitment to evidence based, compassionate, and high-quality care for all patients.”

NPA promotes high standards of healthcare delivery through the empowerment of Nurse Practitioners and the profession throughout New York State. To learn more about this year’s Nurse Practitioner of the Year and Nurse Practitioner Student of the Year, visit here.

University at Buffalo Nursing Professor Recognized for Work in Mental Health and Addictions

University at Buffalo Nursing Professor Recognized for Work in Mental Health and Addictions

Yu-Ping Chang, PhD, associate professor and associate dean for research and scholarship in the University at Buffalo (UB) School of Nursing, was recently named the first School of Nursing Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Professor for her influential work in mental health and addictions.

The Patricia H. Garman Behavioral Health Nursing Endowment Fund Professorship was established to attract and retain the best and brightest nursing faculty, enhance research endeavors, and help the school to realize its vision. Dr. Chang is well known for her widely published and funded research in the areas of mental health, prescription drug misuse, and addictions in older adults.

Marsha Lewis, PhD, professor and dean of the UB School of Nursing, tells Buffalo.edu, “[Dr. Chang’s] scholarship focuses on mental health and addiction; this is particularly relevant to honor Patricia Garman’s career as a psychiatric nurse. Dr. Chang is passionate about issues related to mental health and has proven to be an excellent researcher and outstanding mentor to our tenure-track faculty in helping them develop their research agendas.”

Dr. Chang was recently awarded $1 million from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to increase access to mental health care and substance abuse treatment among American Indian communities in Western New York through clinical training for graduate students in the UB Schools of Nursing and Social Work.

Dr. Chang is also a fellow of the Health Sciences Section of the Gerontological Society of America. She holds a doctorate in nursing degree from Saint Louis University, and a master’s degree in psychiatric and mental health nursing and bachelor’s degree in nursing from Kaohsiung Medical University in Taiwan.

To learn more about Dr. Chang’s career and research in the field of mental health nursing, visit here.

NYU College of Nursing Study Finds Nursing Workforce is Growing More Diverse and Educated

NYU College of Nursing Study Finds Nursing Workforce is Growing More Diverse and Educated

According to a new study by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing researchers, more males and people of color are entering nursing, and more nurses are earning bachelor’s degrees compared with a decade ago. The NYU study used nursing workforce data from 13 states across the US and surveyed four cohorts of nurses in 2006, 2009, 2012, and 2016, capturing data on 5,000 newly licensed nurses to observe changes in the nursing workforce over a 10-year period.

Following a 2010 report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) titled “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health” which provided recommendations on how nurses can best advance the nation’s health, campaigns to help implement the report’s recommendations began. The report emphasized the importance of increasing gender and ethnic diversity in nursing, transforming nursing education, and fostering collaboration between nurses and other professionals.

The NYU study found that from 2005 to 2015:

  • Males entering the nursing profession grew from 8.8 percent to 13.6 percent
  • Nurses of color joining the workforce grew from 22.2 percent to 26.2 percent
  • New nurses entering the workforce with a bachelor’s degree grew from 36.6 percent to 48.5 percent
  • Working relationships between nurses and physicians improved by 7 percent
  • The percentage of white (non-Hispanic) nurses decreased from 78.9 percent in 2008 to 73.8 percent in 2015

Christine T. Kovner, RN, PhD, Mathey Mezey Professor of Geriatric Nursing at NYU Meyers, tells NYU.edu, “The four cohorts of new nurses were remarkably different from each other in ways that could have an important impact on workforce planning. We suspect that changes in the US economic environment, including the recession, were likely to have influenced the educational and diversity trends of new nurses, encouraging them to enter the field during a difficult period for employment.”

The study also found that today’s nurses have high ambitions. The 2015 cohort was asked about the highest degree they were pursuing or plan to pursue: 49.2 percent reported bachelor’s degrees, 56.9 percent reported master’s degrees, and 20.4 percent reported pursuing or planning to pursue a doctoral degree. 40.3 percent of the cohort also reported they learned to work in teams with professions from other fields including medicine, social work, physical therapy, occupation therapy, dental, and pharmacy.

To learn more about NYU’s study of nursing workforce changes over the last 10 years, read the full news release here.

Adelphi University Inspires High School Students to Become Nurses through Pre-College Summer Program

Adelphi University Inspires High School Students to Become Nurses through Pre-College Summer Program

Adelphi University welcomed high school students from all four years to join their flagship Pre-College Summer Programs – Introduction to Nursing, which allowed students to experience state-of-the-art clinical education and simulation labs, visit a local hospital to observe an open-heart surgery, and interact with faculty and staff in the College of Nursing and Public Health.

The program ran for two weeks in July, allowing high school students to experience what it’s like to work in the nursing field and decide whether it’s a career path they want to pursue. Adelphi follows a model of personalized education and their summer programs allow high school students to experience the model firsthand.

One student in particular, Jacob Rios, was able to explore his interest in nursing which was sparked by experiencing multiple health issues among his family. Rios, a senior from Cristo Rey New York High School, discussed his experience visiting a hospital with LongIsland.com:

“We got to see actual surgery happen, it was an open-heart surgery and we were watching through the window. We went to radiology and got to see how CAT scans work, how MRIs work, how X-rays work and we got to see babies in the pediatric ICU from really small babies to full term.”

The simulation labs were also popular with students in the program, inspiring high school students to pursue nursing degrees by giving them a real-life look into how the curriculum and a career in the field would feel. To learn more about Adelphi’s Pre-College Programs, visit here.