University at Buffalo School of Nursing Receives $2.4M to Expand Mental Health Care in American Indian Communities

University at Buffalo School of Nursing Receives $2.4M to Expand Mental Health Care in American Indian Communities

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has granted $2.4 million in funding to the University at Buffalo (UB) School of Nursing to increase access to mental health care and substance abuse treatment among American Indian communities in Western New York.

Provided as three separate grants, the awards will allow the university to hire nursing staff and train nursing students in rural and underserved areas, develop mental health and substance abuse screening and treatment programs, and provide telehealth access for remote treatment.

Yu-Ping Chang, associate professor and associate dean for research and scholarship in the UB School of Nursing, will be partnering with the Tuscarora Health Center, the only primary care clinic serving the Tuscarora Indian Reservation in Lewiston, to increase access to mental health and substance abuse screening and treatment at the facility. Chang tells the UB News Center:

“American Indians and Alaskan Natives have endured both limited and differential access to resources, creating disparities in health status and a lack of exposure to quality health care when compared with other racial and ethnic groups. They also have increased risks for many health conditions, including mental health and substance abuse, which leads to higher mortality rates.”

The grants are intended to fund the development of an interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) team to lead screenings and behavioral health care, and to provide clinical training to graduate students in the UB School of Nursing and School of Social Work. To learn more about UB’s efforts to expand mental health care access for American Indian communities, visit here.

Columbia University School of Nursing Welcomes Visitors to Dedication Ceremony for Cutting-Edge New Building

Columbia University School of Nursing Welcomes Visitors to Dedication Ceremony for Cutting-Edge New Building

On Thursday, June 8, the Columbia University School of Nursing welcomed faculty, alumni, and friends of the Columbia community to a dedication ceremony for its cutting-edge new building. The seven-story, 68,000-square-foot facility is located on 168th Street and Audubon Avenue in Washington Heights.

The most significant feature in the new building is a two-story, state-of-the-art simulation laboratory, designed to prepare students to meet the changing demands of the profession as expert clinicians, researchers, and educators. Other notable features of the building include a large assembly space, sprawling rooftop terrace, meeting rooms, and a café on the ground floor. The building is also decorated with archival photos providing a visual retelling of the nursing school’s 125-year history.

Lee Goldman, MD, dean of the Faculties of Health Sciences and Medicine and chief executive of Columbia University Medical Center tells Nursing.Columbia.edu.

“Columbia University School of Nursing needed a space to match its celebrated record as a leader in nursing education, research and practice, and the new facility beautifully fulfills this need. This building is a fitting centerpiece for nursing at Columbia.”

The impressive 16,000-square-foot Helene Fuld Health Trust Simulation Center is the “literal and figural ‘heart’ of Columbia Nursing’s new home,” according to the building’s architect, Jonathan Kanda. Students will now be able to practice clinical skills in simulated hospital rooms, exam rooms, in-patient hospital rooms, and birth simulation in the labor and delivery suite in a space that quadruple’s the school’s current simulation space.

To learn more about Columbia Nursing’s new state-of-the-art home and dedication ceremony, visit here.

Columbia University School of Nursing to Hold Dedication Ceremony for Cutting-Edge New Building

Columbia University School of Nursing to Hold Dedication Ceremony for Cutting-Edge New Building

The Columbia University School of Nursing welcomes faculty, alumni, and friends of the Columbia community to a dedication ceremony for its cutting-edge new building to be introduced Thursday, June 8. This new home for the School of Nursing will provide current and future nursing students with an ultramodern learning environment that will prepare them for the changing demands of the profession as expert clinicians, researchers, and educators.

Following the dedication program, guests will receive a tour of the glass-enclosed building including its planted rooftop terrace, collaboration and study spaces, and archival photographs displayed throughout to tell the story of the school’s 125-year heritage. The seven-story, 68,000-square-foot structure features a two-story, high-tech simulation learning laboratory including a simulated birthing scenario with human patient simulators. Guests will get to see nursing students demonstrate use of this leading-edge facility.

When the new building was first announced in October 2013, Columbia President Lee. C. Bollinger told the Columbia Newsroom, “Columbia’s mission of teaching and research, patient care and public service all come together so vitally in our School of Nursing. This new state-of-the-art facility for the school is another in a series of important steps forward not only for Columbia University Medical Center’s home campus in Washington Heights, but for the university as a whole as well as for our neighbors in Northern Manhattan.”

The dedication program will feature speakers including Bollinger and Bobbie Berkowitz, PhD, Dean of Columbia University School of Nursing. The new School of Nursing building is located at the corner of 168th Street and Audubon Avenue in Manhattan.

Dr. Bei Wu of NYU Nursing Receives Distinguished Scientist Award for Research in Geriatric Oral Health

Dr. Bei Wu of NYU Nursing Receives Distinguished Scientist Award for Research in Geriatric Oral Health

Dr. Bei Wu, PhD, Professor in the New York University (NYU) Rory Meyers College of Nursing, was recently honored with a 2017 International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Distinguished Scientist Award for Geriatric Oral Research. The award is given to stimulate, encourage, and recognize outstanding research accomplishments in the field of geriatric oral research.

To receive the award, recipients must have conducted original and important investigations in basic, clinical, or epidemiological sciences associated with geriatric oral health. Dr. Wu has published several papers on topics related to oral health disparities in older adults, trends and trajectories of oral health, and oral health in relationship to cognitive impairment and diabetes.

Recent research conducted by Dr. Wu found that certain oral health measures like number of teeth and periodontal disease were not associated with risk of cognitive decline or incidental dementia. Cognitive decline was also not associated with greater loss of teeth or number of decayed teeth. According to NYU.edu, Dr. Wu notes that,

“It is unclear how or whether oral health and cognitive status are related. Additional research is needed in which there is greater agreement on how oral health and cognitive states are assessed to better examine the linkages between these two health outcomes.”

To learn more about Dr. Wu’s position at NYU and her influence in the field of geriatric oral health research, visit here.

New Study Shows Nurse Volunteer Activities Improve Health of Communities They Serve

New Study Shows Nurse Volunteer Activities Improve Health of Communities They Serve

A new study published in the journal Policy, Politics, & Nursing Practice titled “Nurses Improve their Communities’ Health Where They Live, Learn, Work, and Play,” shows that nurse volunteer activities improve the health of their communities.

The data comes from 315 written responses to the question, “Please tell us about what you have done in the past year to improve the health of your community.” The question was originally included in a 2016 RN Workforce Study funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

The study was conducted by two professors: Meriel McCollum, BSN, RN, researcher at the University of North Carolina School of Nursing at Chapel Hill, and Christine T. Kovner, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor in the New York University (NYU) Rory Meyers College of Nursing. According to NYU.edu, the authors describe nurse respondents’ perceptions of how they promote health in their communities through both formal and informal volunteer work.

In recent years there has been increased visibility for nurses who serve as disaster respondents or international aid volunteers. The American Red Cross currently has over 20,000 nurse volunteers who support victims of natural and man-made disasters, and thousands more nurses informally promote health behaviors in community-based settings where people live, work, and socialize by fostering a culture of health in their own communities.

According to NYU.edu, McCollum states: “We found that nurses are committed to promoting a culture of health in their communities both at work and in their daily lives. Leveraging nurses’ interest in volunteer work could improve the way nurses engage with their communities, expand the role of nurses as public health professionals, and foster the social desirability of healthful living.”

Final results of the study reported that 17% of respondents identified job-related volunteer activities; 74% identified non-job-related activities; and 9% of respondents indicated that they do not participate in volunteer work.

To learn more about this study and how nursing volunteer work affects the communities they serve, visit here.

Pace University Launches PhD in Nursing Program on Pleasantville Campus

Pace University Launches PhD in Nursing Program on Pleasantville Campus

Pace University’s College of Health Professions is launching a new PhD in Nursing program on their Pleasantville, NY campus starting in the Fall semester. Students and faculty will work to overcome the root causes of health problems, which they’ve termed “social determinants of health.”

The PhD program will be following objectives of the World Health Organization including an emphasis on reducing social disparities in health; organizing health services around individual needs and expectations; integrating health into all sectors; pursuing collaborative models of policy dialogue; and increasing stakeholder participation.

Once open, Pace will be the only PhD in Nursing program from New York City to Binghamton. Keville Frederickson, EdD, RN, FAAN, PhD program project leader and professor in the Lienhard School of Nursing tells Pace.edu,

“This is an exceptional milestone for the College of Health Professions as the first PhD. The program will be the only PhD in Nursing in the Hudson Valley. Our graduates will be prepared as nurse leaders, scientists, policy makers, and innovators in health care. Their research will focus on primary health care, a people centered approach to health that makes prevention as important as cure.”

As the only PhD nursing program in the Hudson Valley, Pace administrators hope to make a difference in their region by enabling more nurses in the area to further their education and research capabilities. These advanced nurses will be able to prepare future nurses to tackle complex problems facing the health care system in New York State and beyond.

To learn more about Pace University’s PhD in Nursing program, visit here.

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