Dr. Bei Wu of NYU Nursing Receives Distinguished Scientist Award for Research in Geriatric Oral Health

Dr. Bei Wu of NYU Nursing Receives Distinguished Scientist Award for Research in Geriatric Oral Health

Dr. Bei Wu, PhD, Professor in the New York University (NYU) Rory Meyers College of Nursing, was recently honored with a 2017 International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Distinguished Scientist Award for Geriatric Oral Research. The award is given to stimulate, encourage, and recognize outstanding research accomplishments in the field of geriatric oral research.

To receive the award, recipients must have conducted original and important investigations in basic, clinical, or epidemiological sciences associated with geriatric oral health. Dr. Wu has published several papers on topics related to oral health disparities in older adults, trends and trajectories of oral health, and oral health in relationship to cognitive impairment and diabetes.

Recent research conducted by Dr. Wu found that certain oral health measures like number of teeth and periodontal disease were not associated with risk of cognitive decline or incidental dementia. Cognitive decline was also not associated with greater loss of teeth or number of decayed teeth. According to NYU.edu, Dr. Wu notes that,

“It is unclear how or whether oral health and cognitive status are related. Additional research is needed in which there is greater agreement on how oral health and cognitive states are assessed to better examine the linkages between these two health outcomes.”

To learn more about Dr. Wu’s position at NYU and her influence in the field of geriatric oral health research, visit here.

New Study Shows Nurse Volunteer Activities Improve Health of Communities They Serve

New Study Shows Nurse Volunteer Activities Improve Health of Communities They Serve

A new study published in the journal Policy, Politics, & Nursing Practice titled “Nurses Improve their Communities’ Health Where They Live, Learn, Work, and Play,” shows that nurse volunteer activities improve the health of their communities.

The data comes from 315 written responses to the question, “Please tell us about what you have done in the past year to improve the health of your community.” The question was originally included in a 2016 RN Workforce Study funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

The study was conducted by two professors: Meriel McCollum, BSN, RN, researcher at the University of North Carolina School of Nursing at Chapel Hill, and Christine T. Kovner, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor in the New York University (NYU) Rory Meyers College of Nursing. According to NYU.edu, the authors describe nurse respondents’ perceptions of how they promote health in their communities through both formal and informal volunteer work.

In recent years there has been increased visibility for nurses who serve as disaster respondents or international aid volunteers. The American Red Cross currently has over 20,000 nurse volunteers who support victims of natural and man-made disasters, and thousands more nurses informally promote health behaviors in community-based settings where people live, work, and socialize by fostering a culture of health in their own communities.

According to NYU.edu, McCollum states: “We found that nurses are committed to promoting a culture of health in their communities both at work and in their daily lives. Leveraging nurses’ interest in volunteer work could improve the way nurses engage with their communities, expand the role of nurses as public health professionals, and foster the social desirability of healthful living.”

Final results of the study reported that 17% of respondents identified job-related volunteer activities; 74% identified non-job-related activities; and 9% of respondents indicated that they do not participate in volunteer work.

To learn more about this study and how nursing volunteer work affects the communities they serve, visit here.

Pace University Launches PhD in Nursing Program on Pleasantville Campus

Pace University Launches PhD in Nursing Program on Pleasantville Campus

Pace University’s College of Health Professions is launching a new PhD in Nursing program on their Pleasantville, NY campus starting in the Fall semester. Students and faculty will work to overcome the root causes of health problems, which they’ve termed “social determinants of health.”

The PhD program will be following objectives of the World Health Organization including an emphasis on reducing social disparities in health; organizing health services around individual needs and expectations; integrating health into all sectors; pursuing collaborative models of policy dialogue; and increasing stakeholder participation.

Once open, Pace will be the only PhD in Nursing program from New York City to Binghamton. Keville Frederickson, EdD, RN, FAAN, PhD program project leader and professor in the Lienhard School of Nursing tells Pace.edu,

“This is an exceptional milestone for the College of Health Professions as the first PhD. The program will be the only PhD in Nursing in the Hudson Valley. Our graduates will be prepared as nurse leaders, scientists, policy makers, and innovators in health care. Their research will focus on primary health care, a people centered approach to health that makes prevention as important as cure.”

As the only PhD nursing program in the Hudson Valley, Pace administrators hope to make a difference in their region by enabling more nurses in the area to further their education and research capabilities. These advanced nurses will be able to prepare future nurses to tackle complex problems facing the health care system in New York State and beyond.

To learn more about Pace University’s PhD in Nursing program, visit here.

University of Rochester School of Nursing Addresses Mental Health Needs through Distance Nurse Practitioner Program

University of Rochester School of Nursing Addresses Mental Health Needs through Distance Nurse Practitioner Program

The University of Rochester (UR) School of Nursing recently relaunched its Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program (FPMHNP) as a distance program to address critical shortages of mental health care providers in New York state and around the country.

Following a distance learning model, students in the program are able to stay at home and in their current jobs while returning to school to advance their careers. Faculty have designed the online courses to offer effective learning techniques in a personal way. Thanks to today’s technology, the program offers face-to-face contact between student and professor so students can ask questions and go over material in detail the same way on-campus students interact with their instructors.

The US Health Resources & Services Administration predicts that the need for mental health care providers will grow acute over the next decade, especially in rural areas where nurses don’t always have access to traditional graduate programs. Susan Blaakman, PhD, RN, NPP-BC, associate professor of clinical nursing and co-director of the FPMHNP program tells the UR Newsroom,

“Our aim is to reach enough students to significantly increase the number of advanced practice providers who are trained in mental health across the lifespan and can deliver care in areas that are in desperate need of these resources.”

To learn more about UR’s Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program, visit here.

Stony Brook University and Suffolk County Community College Launch Joint Admissions Nursing Program

Stony Brook University and Suffolk County Community College Launch Joint Admissions Nursing Program

The Stony Brook University School of Nursing and Suffolk County Community College, both located on Long Island, NY, recently announced they are launching the Suffolk-Stony Brook Nursing First Program. Beginning in September 2017, the new program will take on an inaugural class of 65 students who will be accepted into an Associate of Science Degree in Nursing Program at Suffolk and then be pre-selected to move directly into a Registered Nurse BSN program at Stony Brook.

Kenneth Kaushansky, MD, MACP, Senior Vice President of the Health Sciences and Dean of the Stony Brook School of Medicine, tells the Stony Brook Newsroom, “The purpose of Nursing First is to facilitate academic progression to higher levels of education in nursing. It will also help build a stronger nursing workforce on Long Island and in New York State.” Dr. Lee Anne Xippolitos, Dean of the Stony Brook University School of Nursing, explains the need for the nursing program partnership:

“Our colleagues at Suffolk do an outstanding job in preparing and diversifying our nursing workforce with the selection and training of future nurses. However, with dramatic changes in an ever-changing healthcare landscape, the need to educate nurses who are skilled at the highest levels is necessary. This program provides the students with a wonderful bridge to that education.”

Students in the program will take part in the joint nursing program which creates a pathway for students to move directly from the largest SUNY associate degree program to the best bachelor’s program in the SUNY system. With an educational model emphasizing the importance of smooth academic transition from associate to baccalaureate nursing programs, Nursing First students will be well prepared for a diverse nursing workforce and fast-paced healthcare landscape.

To learn more about the new Suffolk-Stony Brook Nursing First Program, visit here.

Binghamton University to Use $21 Million in State Funding to Relocate and Expand School of Nursing

Binghamton University to Use $21 Million in State Funding to Relocate and Expand School of Nursing

Binghamton University, located in Johnson City, NY, will use $21 million in state funding to relocate and expand the Decker School of Nursing. This project is the second phase of construction for Binghamton’s $105 million Health Sciences and Technology Innovation Park, including construction of the new $60 million School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Governor Andrew Cuomo expects the Binghamton project to result in the creation of 150 new jobs and retention of 325 existing jobs.

The Technology Innovation Park was made a priority by Cuomo in 2014 with a commitment of $10 million in capital resources to support the initial planning and development costs for the new School of Pharmacy. Binghamton’s $21 million in state funding comes from the Upstate Revitalization Initiative (URI). The funding will go toward supporting building renovations and upgrades and expanding the facility will allow the school to offer new health sciences and public health programs.

Along with the renovations, the new facilities will include clinical, educational, and community partner spaces. Renovations are to begin immediately and expected to be completed in August 2020. Once the renovations are complete, Binghamton will enroll over 430 undergraduate students and 170 graduate students in the School of Nursing. Partnering the new School of Pharmacy with the expanded School of Nursing will allow for new advanced disciplines to boost Binghamton’s reputation as a leader in higher learning and medical research.