Nurse of the Week: School Nurse, Annie Young, Saves Young Boy in Cardiac Arrest

Nurse of the Week: School Nurse, Annie Young, Saves Young Boy in Cardiac Arrest

Our Nurse of the Week is Annie Young, a school nurse at Lake Highlands Junior High in Dallas, TX. Young was in the middle of paperwork on a slow Tuesday afternoon when two runners from a last period gym class came barreling into her clinic yelling about a collapsed student. She knew the word “collapse” meant something serious and seeing the panic on the boys’ faces, she grabbed an AED and office aide before following the boys back to the track field.

The collapsed student turned out to be 13-year-old Joe Krejci who was running laps on an outdoor track field when his coach saw him take a dive just shy of the finish line. When Joe stayed still on the ground not making any noise, Coach T started to worry. He found no signs of bleeding or injury, but felt only a faint heartbeat. That’s when he dialed 911 and sent two boys running to find the school nurse.

When Nurse Young reached the track field, she helped Coach T attach the AED shock pads. The AED elicited a “Shock Advised” warning which was enough to force Joe’s heart back into normal rhythm. Then Young began chest compressions while the office aide started mouth to mouth, both of them performing CPR until paramedics arrived a few minutes later.

After making the switch from labor and delivery to school nursing in 2013, Young quickly learned the job wouldn’t be quite as easy as handing out band-aids. Junior high kids are dealing with anxiety disorders and depression, severe allergies, asthma, seizures, and a number of other chronic health issues. At a school with 800 students, Young sees 20-30 kids a day, but she’s not just in charge of treating students. She also has paperwork to fill out, doctors and administrators to consult, prescriptions to track, conditions to monitor, and screenings to organize. Unexpected life-threatening emergencies can also strike at a moment’s notice like in Joe’s case.

Joe had no medical history, but he had gone without oxygen for an estimated six to seven minutes while in cardiac arrest and doctors warned of the severe damage that might have occurred in that time. However, doctors determined a few days later that Joe had lucked out – after a few days of rest he would return to his normal self. Doctors told Joe’s parents he shouldn’t be alive after the cardiac trauma he experienced, but thanks to the care he received from Coach T and Nurse Young, he returned to school a week later.

To learn more about Annie Young and her experience with school nursing, visit here.

Vanderbilt School of Nursing Plans New Building Expansion

Vanderbilt School of Nursing Plans New Building Expansion

The Vanderbilt University School of Nursing is preparing to break ground on a 29,947-square-foot addition that will connect to the existing nursing buildings on campus. Construction of the $23.6 million facility will begin in late spring and is expected to open in August 2018.

The new School of Nursing building will be a five-floor structure housing technologically advanced classrooms, conference and seminar rooms, student services offices, faculty offices, and a state-of-the-art simulation teaching lab allowing students to develop complex skills and receive real-time feedback during clinical nursing hours. Virtual classrooms will use leading-edge distance technology to facilitate distance learning techniques. Additional nursing classroom space will also create free space in one of the existing nursing buildings allowing that space to be dedicated to research and a special group of research faculty.

Linda Norman, dean and Valere Potter Menefee Professor of Nursing at Vanderbilt tells News.Vanderbilt.edu, “The building expansion is needed to accommodate the increased number of students, faculty and staff, and to ensure the school continues to attract and recruit the best students and faculty.” After an increase in nursing students from 580 in 2006 to 879 in 2017, the School of Nursing has to find a way to facilitate their exponential growth.

To learn more about Vanderbilt’s new nursing building expansion, visit here.

Loma Linda University School of Nursing Seeks Early-Career PhD Candidates

Loma Linda University School of Nursing Seeks Early-Career PhD Candidates

After two years of improvements to their nursing program, including distance learning and enhanced flexibility, the Loma Linda University School of Nursing is seeking an early-career cohort of PhD applications. The nursing school is looking for applicants in their 20s and 30s to output a greater number of nurses who can sustain a longer career in nursing research they are passionate about.

Ellen D’Errico, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, an associate professor who oversees the PhD program tells News.LLU.edu, “Our graduates get to further their career as health care leaders or get involved in academia as researchers, faculty, and developing the next generation of nurses, which many people find exhilarating and rewarding.”

The university spent two years retooling the PhD program after examining how to best serve potential students, including lessening demand for face-to-face only teaching methods. New doctoral candidates will only be required to spend a few days on campus per quarter, and more distance learning options are in the works for future students. Program administrators hope the revised PhD program will appeal to a larger pool of qualified applicants who want a flexible program that will allow them to work as nurse scientists, leaders, and faculty after completing their degree.

Two PhD nursing programs are offered: Master’s Entry PhD and Post-Baccalaureate PhD. For more information on Loma Linda University’s PhD nursing programs, visit here.

Pennsylvania Hospitals Expand Innovative Nurse Residency Program

Pennsylvania Hospitals Expand Innovative Nurse Residency Program

As part of a joint initiative between the Pennsylvania Action Coalition (PA-AC) and The Vizient/AACN Nurse Residency Program, over 40 Pennsylvania hospitals will participate in the Pennsylvania Nurse Residency Collaborative (PA-NRC). Recommendation that nursing programs create nursing residencies was introduced in the Institute of Medicine’s Future of Nursing Report, and Pennsylvania is the third state to implement a nurse residency program at the state level.

Developed by Vizient, Inc. and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), the Nurse Residency Program was developed to ease nurse transition from the classroom to the clinical practice setting in order to promote quality, safety, and reduce turnover rates among first-year nurses. According to BusinessWire.com, PA-AC Executive Director Sarah Hexem says,

“Nurses want more resources and training focused on leadership, patient outcomes, and professional development, and now Pennsylvania hospitals are leading the way in training for new nurses. This training will empower nurses with evidence-based resources that will improve patient care and better welcome nurses to the clinical setting.”

PA-NRC will be welcoming 40 hospitals to participate in the first year of the program, including early adopters in addition to several new hospitals and health systems. The Nurse Residency Collaborative will also be beneficial to the rural hospitals in the state which require greater resources to meet the training capacity offered by their urban competitors.

West Virginia University School of Nursing Partners with Attorney General on School Drug Prevention

West Virginia University School of Nursing Partners with Attorney General on School Drug Prevention

In an effort to share drug abuse prevention information with middle school students, State Attorney General Patrick Morrisey has partnered with the West Virginia University (WVU) School of Nursing to collaborate on opioid abuse prevention. The initiative will focus on eighth grade students from Harrison, Marion, Marshall, Monongalia, Preston, and Wetzel counties.

The collaboration is just one initiative the Attorney General has pursued to combat the drug overdose rate in West Virginia. Toni DiChiacchio, assistant dean of faculty practice and community engagement for the WVU School of Nursing, tells WVRecord.com:

“This is an important outreach initiative for our students who soon will be treating patients with substance abuse issues. Education is critical in helping to address addiction issues in our state and by providing our communities, including our schools, with tools and resources, we hope to continue to raise awareness on this important healthcare issue.”

The Attorney General and nursing students from WVU will coordinate to travel to each school and present curriculum that covers the opioid epidemic, prevention, and the long-term impact of drug use. Both partners hope to expand the program to other counties in the future. Other statewide efforts to lower the drug overdose rate include criminal prosecutions, civil litigation, multi-state initiatives, new technology, and a best practices toolkit.

Nurse of the Week: Baylor Nursing Students Shave Heads to Raise Money for Children’s Cancer Research

Nurse of the Week: Baylor Nursing Students Shave Heads to Raise Money for Children’s Cancer Research

Our Nurses of the Week are from Baylor’s Student Nurses Association (BSNA). Recently, the Baylor University Louise Herrington School of Nursing served as a temporary hair salon, when students and faculty shaved their heads in solidarity with children who lose their hair during cancer treatment. The BSNA worked with St. Baldrick’s Foundation, a nonprofit organization that raises money for cancer research.

According to St. Baldrick’s Foundation, cancer kills more children in the US than any other disease and worldwide a child is diagnosed with cancer every two minutes. Thanks to great strides in research, 90 percent of children who are diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common type of cancer, now survive. However, there are over a dozen types of childhood cancer and many of them offer little hope of a cure. Kaitlyn Po, a senior nursing student and president of BSNA, tells Baylor.edu,

“As future nurses, we feel passionate about finding service events revolved around the healthcare community and impact a specific patient population, such as pediatric cancer patients.”

Pediatric cancers only received four percent of the National Cancer Institute budget in 2011, so St. Baldrick’s is trying to fill the funding gap. Money raised by St. Baldrick’s funds research for all childhood cancer to help find cures and improve supportive care for young patients and their families. Libby Rosonet, MSN, RN, lecturer in the Baylor School of Nursing, believes that the future of pediatric cancer is in research. The only way to help keep that research going is through funding, and fundraising ideas like BSNA’s going bald event is a creative way to make it happen.

To learn more about Baylor’s fundraising efforts for children’s cancer research, visit here.