Virginia School Nurses Attend Mass Casualty and Disaster Training

Virginia School Nurses Attend Mass Casualty and Disaster Training

Virginia school nurses recently gathered at Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital for a day of mass casualty and disaster training hosted by the National Association of School Nurses (NASN). The NASN offers mass casualty training to anyone who cares for children so that they know how to react in an emergency.

Eighty-four school nurses attended and spent the day learning how to handle influenza outbreaks, school shootings, explosions, tornadoes, and a wide variety of other emergency situations, natural and otherwise, that could happen at any time.

Rebekah Reiner, Roanoke City nursing preceptor, tells www.WSLS.com, “Sometimes, the only person that they trust in the school is that nurse. So it’s nice knowing that the nurse is there to help and they feel a little more confident knowing that the nurse is stepping into the medical role.”

This was the first time that the School Emergency Triage training has been offered in the Roanoke area. School nurses fought to bring the program to Virginia in hopes that all local school nurses would get the necessary training to be a source of life-saving care and comfort in an emergency situation.

Ellen Carroll, school nurse manager for Carilion Student Health, tells www.WSLS.com, “No one wants to think that it will ever happen in their school, but unfortunately, things do happen in schools and schools are big resource areas for communities so we need to be prepared for that.”

To learn more about the National Association of School Nurses mass casualty and disaster training programs, visit here.

Nurses of the Week: University of Arkansas Nursing Students Volunteer in Ghana

Nurses of the Week: University of Arkansas Nursing Students Volunteer in Ghana

Our Nurses of the Week are fifteen students from the University of Arkansas Eleanor Mann School of Nursing who spent three weeks this past June volunteering in Ghana, a country in West Africa. The students spent their time helping to deliver babies, teaching wound care, infant hydration, dental hygiene, and CPR, but they also got to experience the local culture at a Ghanaian wedding and while spotting elephants in the wild on a safari.

Study abroad experiences for the nursing school have only recently been offered. The trip was organized by Carol Agana, instructor of nursing, who has traveled to West Africa many times over the last decade and owns a home there with her husband, a Ghana native. Through her connections there, Agana partnered with local healthcare providers and nonprofits to set up learning opportunities for her nursing students. Allison Scott, assistant professor of nursing, also joined on the trip.

The students were required to attend pre-travel meetings to learn about the African healthcare system, chronic diseases, health disparities, and techniques for assessing health in communities. Agana and Scott wanted the students to understand that they were going there to learn, not to change things. Natalie Gohman, a senior nursing student at the University of Arkansas who plans to graduate next May, tells News.UArk.edu:

“We all learned a lot about ourselves. We’ve grown up in America, where our health-care system is one of the best. This area doesn’t have that, yet we learned about different procedures and everyday tasks they do in a much simpler way using the resources they have.”

To learn more about these students’ experience volunteering in Ghana, visit their public Facebook page or https://goo.gl/C9DXev.

Louisiana State University School of Nursing Receives $1.4 Million Grant for Rural and Underserved Areas

Louisiana State University School of Nursing Receives $1.4 Million Grant for Rural and Underserved Areas

The Louisiana State University (LSU) Health New Orleans School of Nursing was recently awarded a $1.4 million federal grant to help prepare primary care advanced practice registered nurses to practice in rural and underserved areas.

The grant was awarded by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Advanced Nursing Education Workforce (ANEW) program and will be distributed over the course of two years. Funding is expected to target clinical training in the school’s primary care family and adult gerontology primary care nurse practitioner programs.

Twenty-five students will receive trainee awards ranging from $1,500 to $8,000 per academic year. Eligible students who are enrolled full-time will receive direct aid to help with tuition, books, and living expenses. The program will also help support academic-practice partnerships for students, including a partnership with University Medical Center New Orleans Ambulatory Clinics for students working in underserved areas of the state.

To learn more about LSU’s nursing programs and available grants for students serving in rural areas, visit here.

Capella School of Nursing and Health Sciences Adds Dr. Cole Edmonson to Advisory Board

Capella School of Nursing and Health Sciences Adds Dr. Cole Edmonson to Advisory Board

Cole Edmonson, DNP, RN, FACHE, NEA-BC, FAAN, recently joined Capella University’s School of Nursing and Health Sciences Advisory Board. As a member of the advisory board, Dr. Edmonson will be responsible for collaborating with Capella leaders and faculty to help effectively prepare nurses for today’s complex health care environment.

Over the course of his 20 year career, Dr. Edmonson has served as a direct-care nurse, supervisor, manager, director, and associate chief nursing officer. He holds a BSN and MSN from the University of Oklahoma, and a DNP from Texas Christian University. Dr. Edmonson is currently the chief nursing officer at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas.

F. Patrick Robinson, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of Capella’s School of Nursing Health Sciences, announced in a press release, “By working closely with industry experts at the front lines of health care, Capella is constantly evolving its models of teaching and learning, with the goal to close the gap between higher education and patient care. Dr. Edmonson will provide the board with invaluable insights on how Capella can help equip tomorrow’s nurse leaders with the right competencies.”

The Capella Advisory Board is in place to provide industry insight to school leaders and faculty to uphold Capella’s mission to meet the needs found within the health care sector. To learn more about Capella’s Advisory Board and new member Dr. Edmonson, visit here.

Cal State Fullerton Receives $1.4 Million Grant to Support Advanced Practice Nurse Training

Cal State Fullerton Receives $1.4 Million Grant to Support Advanced Practice Nurse Training

Cal State Fullerton has partnered with Mountains Community Hospital and Rural Health Clinics to place nurse-midwife and women’s health nurse practitioner trainees at a critical access point for communities near the San Bernardino Mountains. The partnership is called the “Rural-Women of the Mountains Accessing New Services (Rural-WOMANS)” Project and is being launched through a two-year federal grant totaling $1.4 million.

The project is designed to expand women’s health services, creating a pipeline of nursing professionals trained to serve in rural communities that are difficult to recruit and retain advanced practice nurse practitioners. Ruth Mielke, associate professor of nursing and women’s health care concentration coordinator, tells News.Fullerton.edu:

“The rationale is that if a student has a positive clinical experience training in an underserved site, that student may be more likely to consider working in that site or a similar site after graduation.”

Students placed in certain clinic locations will be eligible to receive traineeship scholarships each semester. Forty traineeships will be available starting in Spring 2018 to help cover the costs of tuition, living expenses, and books. There will be an emphasis on supporting students who want to pursue obstetrics-gynecology, rural health, psychiatric, and mental health issues. To learn more about Cal State Fullerton’s grant to support advanced practice nurse training in rural areas, visit here.

UW-Madison School of Nursing Receives $1.3 Million Grant to Recruit Native American Students

UW-Madison School of Nursing Receives $1.3 Million Grant to Recruit Native American Students

The University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison) School of Nursing recently received a $1.3 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration to develop a program to recruit and retain 30 Native American nursing school students.

The project is called “Success Through Recruitment/Retention, Engagement, and Mentorship (STREAM) for American Indian Students Pursuing Nursing Careers” in alignment with a Wisconsin Center for Nursing goal to expand the diversity of the nursing workforce to mirror the diversity of the population they serve.

Native American students are among the most under-represented on the UW-Madison campus, including the nursing program. According to Nursing.Wisc.edu, the Wisconsin nursing workforce is 94 percent white, but the Wisconsin population is only 79 percent white. In addition, 90 percent of nurses who provide services in Wisconsin tribal health facilities are white while a majority of patients are American Indian.

Dr. Audrey Tluczek, director of the recruitment program, tells Channel3000.com, “Having nurses who are actually members of a community is really vital to addressing the great health disparity that actually exists in these communities…We only have one or two students per year who self-identify as American Indian, or Native American.”

The UW-Madison School of Nursing is working with the Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council to recruit and retain 30 Native American nurses and create opportunities for future students and impact health outcomes in their local community. Funding from the grant will provide financial support for Native American nursing students and help develop peer support programs for these students. To learn more about the STREAM grant, visit here.

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