Nurse of the Week: New Nurse Deanna Pavil Tackled Nursing School with Pregnancy and Newborn

Nurse of the Week: New Nurse Deanna Pavil Tackled Nursing School with Pregnancy and Newborn

Our Nurse of the Week is newlywed and new nurse Deanna Pavil who received a big surprise just two days after finding out she was pregnant – she had also been accepted to nursing school at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Pavil was aware of the challenges that would come with juggling pregnancy and a newborn with a rigorous nursing school schedule and didn’t know how to make the right decision. However, her parents encouraged her to follow her dreams and she is now graduated and working as a registered nurse in the outpatient clinics at Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation.

“I enjoyed working in medical records, but knew it wasn’t what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. I wanted to do more to help people and make a difference in their lives. The same week I quit my job, I got a phone call about the CNA class.”

Pavil had known she wanted to pursue a career in healthcare since high school when her family traveled to Anchorage for her grandmother’s open-heart surgery. After high school, she worked in medical records at Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Regional Hospital for four years, then started taking classes to become a certified nurse aid (CNA). It was then that she realized her true calling to become a nurse, and later graduated from UAF with an associate of applied science degree in nursing in December 2016.

In an interview with News.UAF.edu, Pavil says, “I enjoyed working in medical records, but knew it wasn’t what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. I wanted to do more to help people and make a difference in their lives. The same week I quit my job, I got a phone call about the CNA class.”

Pavil was thankful for her CNA experience which made the transition into nursing school much easier. It gave her the training and academic foundation needed to succeed in a challenging nursing school program, but she also couldn’t have graduated without the help of her husband and parents who took time off to help care for her son Bennett. Now that she is a working nurse, Pavil says the best part of her nursing work is helping people in her community.

Thank you, Deanna, for showing other nurses that it’s possible to pursue personal and professional goals simultaneously if you’re willing to put in the hard work. To learn more about Pavil and her experience tackling nursing school and a new family at the same time, visit here.

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Named NLN Center of Excellence

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Named NLN Center of Excellence

The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing was recently designated a Center of Excellence by the National League for Nursing (NLN). The NLN utilizes their Center of Excellence program to recognize schools that demonstrate a commitment to excellence and invested resources to distinguish themselves in a specific area of nursing education.

UAB was recognized for its sustained efforts to “Enhance Student Learning and Professional Development,” a four-year designation that will remain through 2021. Doreen C. Harper, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of the UAB School of Nursing, tells UABNews:

“This designation is an external confirmation of the UAB School of Nursing’s commitment to preparing future nursing leaders, and aligns with our strategic goals of maintaining excellence in teaching and learning, and provides acknowledgement of faculty efforts in continual quality improvement.”

UAB School of Nursing faculty and students are honored by the Center of Excellence designation, and especially proud of the School of Nursing’s dedication to producing professional and advanced practice nurses to care for patients in rural and underserved areas. The school will be recognized at the NLN’s 2017 Education Summit, held in San Diego, CA in September. To learn more about the UAB School of Nursing, visit here.

Fairfield University to Launch Nurse Midwifery Program in Fall 2017

Fairfield University to Launch Nurse Midwifery Program in Fall 2017

Fairfield University recently announced that they will be launching a new Doctor of Nursing Practice program in Nurse Midwifery beginning in Fall 2017.  The DNP program will be offered through Fairfield’s Marion Peckham Egan School of Nursing and Health Studies.

According to Fairfield.edu, the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) in Nurse Midwifery is designed to meet the competencies for the practice doctorate in midwifery set forth by the American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM) and to meet the ACNM Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice. Students in the program will graduate as expert nurse midwives for every stage and in every setting where midwifery care is delivered to women. Jenna LoGiudice, PhD, CNM, RN, Nurse Midwifery Program Director, tells Patch.com:

“Students in the Egan School Nurse Midwifery DNP program will foster their commitment to empowering women throughout the lifespan. The program’s philosophy highlights a dedication to trauma-informed care and perinatal loss. Interprofessional simulation opportunities will occur throughout the program in the brand new Egan School Simulation Center. Midwives are the cornerstone of women’s healthcare and I look forward to welcoming our first cohort of midwifery students this fall.”

DNP students in Fairfield’s Nurse Midwifery program will gain clinical experience by attending births and providing gynecologic, antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, newborn, and breastfeeding care under the supervision of Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) faculty. To learn more about Fairfield University’s DNP in Nurse Midwifery, visit here.

Loma Linda University School of Nursing Cuts Tuition in Half for RN-to-BSN Program

Loma Linda University School of Nursing Cuts Tuition in Half for RN-to-BSN Program

In an effort to make their nursing program more accessible for working nurses, the Loma Linda University School of Nursing has reduced tuition by half for its RN-to-BSN program. Tuition is now $19,600, down from $35,000, to help working nurses who want to earn their bachelor of science.

Completing a BSN degree creates greater professional opportunities for working nurses like becoming a nurse manager, supervisor, or charge nurse. Loma Linda’s RN-to-BSN degree program is fully online and structured to accommodate the schedules of working nurses by allowing them to go back to school full or part time. Nurses with an associate’s degree who have been unable to earn their BSN due to time constraints or high tuition costs are encouraged to try again.

Students in the program will take a range of courses, including public health nursing, management, and research. Loma Linda faculty are committed to helping students reach success and now place a great focus on reducing anxiety for working nurses who are also in school to obtain a higher degree.

To learn more about the Loma Linda RN-to-BSN program and its new tuition requirements, visit here.

Francis Marion University Receives $1.8 Million Federal Grant to Promote Nursing Workforce Diversity

Francis Marion University Receives $1.8 Million Federal Grant to Promote Nursing Workforce Diversity

The Francis Marion University (FMU) School of Health Sciences recently received a $1.8 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) aimed at promoting nursing workforce diversity. The funding will provide four-year grants to cover tuition support for up to 100 students, in addition to funding initiatives for the nursing department like the BSN program.

The HRSA funded the grant from their workforce diversity program to help increase nursing education opportunities for students from disadvantaged or underrepresented backgrounds, including racial and ethnic minorities. Diversity is slowly increasing in the nursing workforce, but the minority participation currently remains below 20 percent according to SCNow.com.

FMU intends to use the funding to improve the diversity of its nursing student body. This will include financial support, assigning graduate student mentors to freshman students, special freshman-level “university life” courses for pre-nursing students, and academic help through the Center for Academic Success and Achievement. Ruth Wittmann-Price, dean of the School of Health Sciences, tells SCNow.com:

“We’re thrilled to receive another HRSA grant and to continue our role in shaping the nursing workforce in the years to come. Our programs, and our impact on the community, continues to grow. We’re proud of what we’ve done, but the future is really exciting.”

FMU is the only university in South Carolina to receive a grant through the workforce diversity program, and this is the fourth HRSA grant the university has received since 2016. All of the grants have been aimed at improving access to healthcare for the community or access to healthcare education for disadvantaged and underserved populations.

To learn more about FMU’s funding to promote nursing workforce diversity, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Michelle Peterson Pursues Nursing Following Job as Victim Advocate

Nurse of the Week: Michelle Peterson Pursues Nursing Following Job as Victim Advocate

Our Nurse of the Week is Michelle Peterson who decided to become a nurse in 2010 after asking an academic advisor at Utah State University (USU), “I like to help people. What should I do?” Before pursuing nursing, Peterson was working as the victim advocate for Grand County, Utah. However, she later decided that nursing would be a better fit, and attended nursing school at USU-Moab from 2012 to 2014. Now, Peterson works as the operating room nurse manager at Moab Regional Hospital.

Although working as a victim advocate was a rewarding job, it also took its toll on Peterson and offered very little job security. Peterson was in her 20s when she became a victim advocate, and after growing up with a stable childhood, she was shocked by the victims she helped who had witnessed domestic violence, child abuse, and other ugly crimes. Now graduated and a working nurse, Peterson tells MoabTimes.com:

“Nursing is the best decision I ever made so even on hard days, there are still so many good things that come out. It’s a high demand, stressful job and that’s why not everybody’s doing it but the benefits outweigh the negatives.”

Being a nurse is a rewarding job for Peterson and she loves helping locals who come to the hospital from babies being born to elderly patients who are dying, and everything in between including preventative care. Vicki Gigliotti, Moab Regional Hospital Chief Clinical Officer, praises Peterson’s nursing management style saying, “She is smart and always willing to learn. As a young nurse manager, she is constantly assuring that her staff members and physicians have the needed resources to provide truly high quality care. Our hospital is grateful to have Michelle, her skill set, and her attitude moving into the future.”

To learn more about Michelle Peterson’s path to nursing and love for the rewarding profession, visit here.

LISTEN TO EPISODE 2 OF NURSECASTS

Focus on the Sim Lab: How Patients with Disabilities are Helping Train Villanova’s Nursing Students

Join host Joe Morita as he interviews the faculty and research team behind the Nursing Simulation Program at Villanova

Listen Now

You have Successfully Subscribed!