The Indiana University School of Nursing and School of Informatics and Computing has begun offering students the opportunity to earn a Master of Science in health informatics while earning a Bachelor’s degree in nursing. This fast-track degree option offers students a flexible, affordable option to improve their career trajectory.

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of health information technicians is expected to grow 15 percent by 2024. The median annual wage for the field was approximately $38,000 in 2016.

Josette Jones, an associate professor of health informatics and nursing at Indiana University, tells News.IU.edu, “From an informatics standpoint, graduates with bachelor’s degrees can struggle to find good-paying jobs. This opportunity gives them a better chance of finding midlevel careers straight out of college.”

Nursing students in the fast-track program can begin taking graduate-level courses in their junior year, allowing them to earn graduate credits at an undergraduate tuition rate. Students in their second year of the program can also work while taking classes part-time or apply for an assistantship. The fast-track program requires a total of 150 credit hours, requiring an additional three semesters to complete both degrees.

To learn more about Indiana University’s fast-track degree to a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Master of Science in Health Informatics, visit here.

Christina Morgan

Christina Morgan

Assistant Editor at Daily Nurse
Christina Morgan is the Assistant Editor for DailyNurse.com
Christina Morgan

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