How to Incorporate National Nurses Week into Your Recruiting Strategy

How to Incorporate National Nurses Week into Your Recruiting Strategy

Learn recruitment strategies that tie in with National Nurses Week and how they can be a helpful tool in gaining quality nursing staff that you are more likely to retain. With the national nursing shortage still an issue today, recruiting new nurses for your clinical positions as well as enticing new student nurses is a top priority. How you go about recruitment can make a difference in whether potential hires choose your hospital as their place of employment.

The Importance of a Recruitment Strategy

The nursing shortage doesn’t necessarily affect your ability to find new hires. Because many hospitals have difficulty with retention, nurses are often looking for new jobs. There are also still plenty of nursing students entering the profession. The real issue is how to attract them. This is where your recruitment strategy becomes invaluable. It’s also vital to keep in mind that your retention strategy starts with your recruitment efforts. The steps you take to recruit new nurses to your program is also what will make them want to stay if you handle it properly.

According to the American Organization of Nurse Executives, a conservative estimate of the money a hospital spends indirect recruitment costs related to a turn-over is $10,000. Building a robust recruitment strategy that is backed by the same fervor of retention efforts can help eliminate the need for this expenditure.

Why National Nurses Week is the Perfect Opportunity to Utilize Your Strategy

During National Nurses Week, employers take the time to celebrate their nursing staff and recognize the hard job they have. Many times, the best recruitments strategies come down to which hospital showed they were the most invested in their employees. That’s why utilizing National Nurses Week in your recruitment strategy can be so helpful – your current employees have a lot to say in the matter.

While 70% of nurses surveyed in Nurse.com’s salary survey said that salary was of utmost importance for job satisfaction, money wasn’t everything. And salary didn’t just mean the dollars they took home. A high salary may look enticing, but cost-of-living has to be factored in as well. Indeed.com surveyed nurses as well, according to their data, scheduling flexibility and work-life balance often took priority over salary. They also reported that 26% of nurses with existing jobs say they’re contacted weekly by recruiters. Standing out from the competition is a must.

With the market as competitive as it is, healthcare organizations need to find new and unique ways to recruit potential hires. National Nurses Week allows you to highlight what makes working for your facility so outstanding. Below are some options for using this week of recognition to help recruit new talent.

Get Personal

When you begin highlighting your open positions via job boards, mass emails, and other techniques, consider the impersonal nature of such strategies. Rather than sending the same form email to all 50 candidates, personalize each with a message related to National Nurses Week. Contact them to show appreciation, maybe including a discount, freebie, or invite to an event you’re holding. You may also want to point out why they’d be a good fit, using specific reasons that stood out to you during the interview process. Tout their potential and offerings, not yours, during this exchange, and you’ll show them that you’re already a step ahead of the competition.

Show, Don’t Just Tell

Part of the promise is what comes of it. Make sure that you are following up on your promises that you make to your potential hires. Give them proof that you’ve been faithful to your word. Perhaps having special nurse week marketing materials that showcase happy employees talking about what is best about your hospital or having a coffee hour each day where a satisfied family comes in and tells about a nurse at your facility that stood out. The more good publicity you can get from happy patients and current staff, the better it looks. Of course, please don’t force it or coerce it in any way, because doing so will come out and backfire.

Let the Data Drive You

One of the smartest things you can do when it comes to hiring is to defer to the data. Not only by doing your research on how things historically go, but by collecting some data of your own. Asking your potential hires questions regarding why they did or didn’t choose your hospital, which recruitment strategy enticed them the most, and even how they prefer to find a job can all be a great source of information to help drive your recruitment strategies. Involving your potential hires and current nurses can also lead to more trust, as it creates a feeling of being heard and valued, which is a trait that many employees look for in a job.

National Nurses Week is an excellent time to implement this. Along with a note of appreciation to each nurse, include a survey with some of these questions and then a section asking how you can make their job better as well as how you can continue to show your appreciation. Consider incentivizing the return of the survey by making it anonymous or adding a gift upon completion. You can even send these surveys along to student nursing programs, giving the students a personal one-on-one invite to tour your hospital or shadow a nurse for a day. Former nursing staff in good standing could also get a survey asking why they left and letting them know you appreciate them and are remembering them during this week.

Your Existing Nursing Staff Should Not Be Overlooked

Letting your nurses know they are appreciated should be a daily occurrence, but during National Nurses Week, it can be especially helpful. Your existing nursing staff is one of the best ways to find new nurses. If they are happy, they will be more likely to recommend an open position to a friend. This is even more true for traveling nurses who may encounter unhappy employees on their journeys. Be sure to treat them just like the long-term staff and find a way to recognize them as well. Consider treating your nurses to some bonus activities during the week, such as a free meal. If you decide to have events during the week, invite the nurses’ families. And remind them how to care for themselves to maintain a positive work-life balance.

Open Your Doors to New Hires

Having an event during National Nurses Week that is part job-fair and part celebration can go a long way with nursing students and potential hires. Give them an inside look into what working for your hospital would look like. Treat each person as if you are genuinely invested in their success by helping them take steps toward getting their first program acceptance or new job. Along with inviting them in for a tour, give them a chance to meet some of the staff they would be working with, including nurses, management, and doctors. Provide a photographer that can take free headshots for their portfolios. Don’t focus on pushing your recruitment strategy and instead let each person walk away with a booklet that covers the approach along with other relevant information about your hospital. If you impress them upfront, the brochure will be the icing on the cake.

Put Out a Press Release

National Nurses Week is the perfect time to announce something new your program is offering or doing. Recently, the news was released that the US Senate vowed to strengthen academic nursing. They were strategic in announcing it during National Nurses Week. Why? Because nurses are paying attention. It’s their week of recognition, and more news comes across their desk that they might want to pay attention to between those discounts and freebie offers that also inevitably come.

Take a Page from the Book of Success

Ideas abound for how to make an impression on potential candidates. If you’re looking for fresh nursing talent and you’re willing to invest in them early, why not take a page out of Western Governors University’s book? To celebrate National Nurses Week in 2016, they awarded scholarships to nurses across the nation. Your program could offer this to student nurses as well as tenured nurses looking to advance in their careers by going back to school.

A Call to Action: Begin Today

Increasing your chances of attracting top nursing talent takes a focus on your potential hire’s best interests. What do they want? Professional development, flexibility, work-life balance, unique perks, fair pair, tuition assistance, and other such incentives go a long way. Taking a personalized approach and showing how much your facility values its nursing staff will attract more potential hires than you expect. It’s easy enough to implement that you can begin right now. The key is to make sure you continue appreciating your nurses every day of the year, as well. For more information on supporting your staff, nurses, or other departments, see our extensive library of published resources that are designed for those in the healthcare field. 

Resources:
  1. https://www.afscme.org/news/publications/health-care/solving-the-nursing-shortage/the-cost-of-failure
  2. https://www.nurse.com/blog/Salary-Report?utm_source=resource%20guide&utm_medium=content&utm_campaign=healthcare-salaries-guide&utm_content=2018
  3. https://www.nurse.com/blog/2017/08/07/nurse-salary-is-only-part-of-the-pie/
  4. http://blog.indeed.com/2019/05/06/how-to-recruit-nurses/
  5. https://www.glassdoor.com/research/studies/why-do-workers-quit/
  6. http://amnhealthcare.investorroom.com/2018-05-08-National-Nurses-Week-AMN-Healthcare-Commitment-to-Excellence-Awards-Recognize-Importance-of-Travel-Nurses-to-Patient-Care
  7. https://dailynurse.com/great-ways-to-care-for-yourself-during-national-nurses-week/
  8. https://dailynurse.com/us-senate-vows-to-strengthen-academic-nursing-during-national-nurses-week/
  9. https://fox8.com/2019/05/05/discounts-freebies-offered-during-national-nurses-week/amp/
  10. https://dailynurse.com/western-governors-university-celebrates-national-nurses-week-offering-125-scholarships-totaling-250000-nurses-across-nation/
  11. https://www.springerpub.com/
Home-Based Primary Care Provider Reduces Vets’ Excess Meds

Home-Based Primary Care Provider Reduces Vets’ Excess Meds

Every morning starts the same way for Veteran Kenneth Tutt, age 79. At 8:00am he makes a phone call to Nurse Practitioner Rhonda Weinhold. Weinhold is a VA Home-Based Primary Care (HBPC) provider. She has been working with Tutt for four years. Together they review his weight, blood pressure and sugar levels. “There is no doubt in my mind I would not be here if it was not for this program,” said Tutt.

Home-Based Primary Care is a VA program bringing primary health care into Veterans’ homes. HBPC provides integrated, patient-centered care for Veterans with complex medical needs. Veterans in the program are assigned a primary care provider like Ms. Weinhold, based at the Staunton, Va., community-based outpatient clinic. “The families, the caregivers in the home, they really depend on us,” she says. “A lot of our patients consider us part of the family.”

“So Many Medications!”

Recently, Weinhold began something new for Tutt and several other patients that has helped to reduce their medications and resulted in higher satisfaction with their quality of life. Not long ago, she attended a VA Geriatric Scholars Program class, which inspired her to develop a medication management program to review patient medication prescriptions. The idea came in part from a HBPC routine: setting up monthly medication boxes. “We love doing it, but we noticed our patients were on so many medications. We just thought, are there medications we could potentially get rid of that actually might be doing more harm or that are not needed?”

She teamed up with HBPC team member Jena Willis, Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD), to develop the idea. The review, it turns out, often results in a reduction of medications. Weinhold says it is good because, “Research shows the more medication patients are on, especially for the elderly population, the greater the risk for falls.” In fact, Tutt admits to having fallen at home a few times in the past. They consolidate the medication de-escalation recommendations, adding them to each patient’s electronic health record. Tutt, like most HBPC patients, takes a lot of medications for a variety of health conditions.

Weinhold asked veterans, “How do you feel about trying to get off some medicine?” Tutt thought, “It was a terrific idea.” The project has helped Tutt feel he’s got a better chance of being the person he’s always been. “I’ve been an outdoor person all my life,” said Tutt, who served in the Navy from 1958 to 1970. “I garden, I raise flowers. I’ve had to cut back, but I’m still mobile.”

HBPC: Keeping Patients Safe in their Homes

“Our goal with Home-Based Primary Care is patient safety,” said Weinhold. “We’re there to keep them safe in the home and to keep them in the home as long as possible.” As they fine-tuned their process, Weinhold brought others onboard. It was a team effort. Three registered nurses met in person with 80 patients over six months. “We were able to reduce the number of medications an average two medicines per patient,” said Weinhold.

After their success in Staunton, they were able to coordinate with Salem VA Medical Center (VAMC) pharmacy residents’ grand rounds presentation on the de-escalation of therapy for the medical department there. The Salem VAMC is Staunton’s Community-Based Outpatient Clinic’s parent facility. The residents added the information to their presentation as an introduction to the rest of the medical facility. “The most rewarding thing is providing improved quality of life for our patients, whether it’s three more days, three more years, or 30 more years,” said Willis.

Maureen Jerrett is a contract writer for VA Geriatric Scholars Program

Penn State Donors Establish $10 Million Nursing Scholarship

Penn State Donors Establish $10 Million Nursing Scholarship

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — An anonymous Penn State donor couple has made a gift of $5 million to endow a scholarship for students with financial need in the College of Nursing. This is the largest single gift the college has received in its six-year history. In addition, the University is matching the gift 1:1, bringing the scholarship endowment total to $10 million. Students from western Pennsylvania and rural regions of the commonwealth will be given first preference for the awards.

“The College of Nursing’s potential for impact on the health of communities across the commonwealth is vast, and these donors have recognized that potential through this remarkable gift,” said Penn State President Eric J. Barron. “Their support will help to address the commonwealth’s pressing need for health care professionals and allow recipients to forge meaningful careers in nursing, transforming their own lives. We’re very grateful for this generous gift.”

College of Nursing undergraduates who must meet the cost of a Penn State degree with loans graduate, on average, with an educational debt of more than $42,500. Recipients of the scholarship, however, will receive annual awards of up to $10,000. This will significantly reduce their debt and allow them more latitude to choose jobs in high-need but lower-paid geographic areas and medical fields that present the most urgent need for nurses.

“The extraordinary couple who made this gift have been impressed by the excellence of Penn State’s nursing programs,” said Laurie Badzek, dean and professor of the College of Nursing. “In particular, they appreciate our work to prepare a generation of nurses with a solid grounding in geriatrics and community health.”

“Nursing is a discipline that touches everyone’s life at some point, and these generous donors are helping to ensure better care across the commonwealth,” said Susan Kukic, director of development and alumni relations for the college. “While they have chosen to remain anonymous, they are important role models whose vision for the future of our students and our college will, I hope, inspire others to consider how they can support excellence in nursing and nursing education.”  

For information on this scholarship and the nursing program at Penn State, visit here.

University of San Francisco RN-MSN Pre-Application Webinar and Offer

University of San Francisco RN-MSN Pre-Application Webinar and Offer

View the Latest RN-MSN Online Event to Learn More about the University of San Francisco RN-MSN Program

Special Offer for RN-MSN Applicants

Any individuals who complete the University of San Francisco RN-MSN pre-application process will receive 1 year of Acadiate Pro free ($239 value). Also, individuals who complete the process prior to October 9th will receive personalized feedback on their pre-application.

Top Nursing Podcasts

Top Nursing Podcasts

Please note that all links are for iTunes.

1.    Johns Hopkins Health Newsfeed

Stay up-to-date with short podcasts on top medical storiesopens in new window from Johns Hopkins.

Each podcast is only about a minute, but provides nurses with the latest info in medicine. There are other subscription options from Johns Hopkins, such as Cancer News Reviewopens in new window and Brain Mattersopens in new window, which run a bit longer and offer information on specific topics.

2.    The Nursing Show

Tune into this weekly podcastopens in new window for news, tips, education and more for nurses at all levels.

The Nursing Show offers a wide range of content that spans nursing news, commentary and interviews from guest nurses and medication information. The host of the show is Jamie Davis, a nationally recognized medical educator whose programs and resources have been downloaded more than 6 million times by listeners and viewers.

3.    Medical Spanish

Receive interactive audio Spanish lessonsopens in new window to further develop your skills for medical settings.

These podcasts help you acquire medical vocabulary, learn correct pronunciation and understand native speakers. Many podcasts are free, while some podcasts and supplemental materials require a paid subscription. Host Molly Martin, a hospitalist in Minneapolis, Minnesota, also produces a Spanish Grammar Reviewopens in new window podcast.

4.    Travel Nursing Insider Podcast

Get the latest insightsopens in new window into the career of travel nursing.

These podcasts provide a wide range of information and advice for the travel nursing specialty. Learn more about this unique career and how to succeed from insiders who know the industry.

5.    A Cup of Health with CDC

Listen in to learn about interesting health factsopens in new window from the CDC.

The podcasts are presented in short, accessible chunks of two to six minutes and cover a wide range of statistics or facts. While basic, they can be useful when presenting this kind of information to patients to educate them about their health.

6.    The Oncology Nursing Podcast

Learn how to care for patients in different life and cancer stagesopens in new window.

These podcasts let listeners join oncology nurses as they discuss topics relevant to nursing practice and treating patients with cancer. Produced by the Oncology Nursing Society, episodes last about 20 minutes.

7.    Health Focus

Reinforce your health and medical knowledge with these short podcastsopens in new window.

This series of weekly interviews on South Carolina Radio features, doctors, nurses and other medical professionals. It presents a wide range of topics presented by award-winning public broadcaster Bobbi Conner.

Enhancing Your Career in Nursing

Podcasts, books and articles are all helpful ways to develop your knowledge and skills. However, one of the best ways to boost your career opportunities is with a degree.

The online RN to BSN program from Aurora University can help nurses take a leadership role in their field. Nurses are able to learn how to be an asset in their current role and to pursue advanced career opportunities. The program takes place in an online learning environment, allowing students the flexibility and convenience to complete their degree while maintaining their work and personal schedule.

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