University of Rhode Island Nurse Practitioner Students Gain Real-Life Experience With Young Patients

University of Rhode Island Nurse Practitioner Students Gain Real-Life Experience With Young Patients

Nursing students from the University of Rhode Island (URI) Nurse Practitioner programs are gaining experience with young patients thanks to a new volunteer opportunity. Taking what they’ve learned in the classroom into the exam room, the students have spent a few recent Saturday mornings at the Rhode Island Nursing Education Center performing full physicals on volunteer children.

These students are enrolled in the Family Nurse Practitioner and Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner programs. The children have been recruited from among friends and family to take part in the exercise where the nursing students interviewed the patients and their parents to gather a full medical and family history, then conducted a comprehensive physical exam.

Twenty URI students took part in the program, which allowed them to apply lessons learned in the classroom to real-life scenarios. Denise Coppa, associate professor and director of Advanced Practice for the College, monitored the exams by video in an adjoining room, allowing her to provide immediate feedback on the students’ performance.

Coppa tells today.uri.edu, “This gives the students great practice on compiling a patient’s history, conducting a physical exam and developing a full assessment of that patient. They benefit from practicing the physical exam as well as working on their communication skills with a patient. It gives the students real-world experience they can take with them.”

To learn more about how University of Rhode Island nurse practitioner students are gaining real-world experience with young patients, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Nursing Student Bethany Moore Designs College Experience to Serve Those Close to Home

Nurse of the Week: Nursing Student Bethany Moore Designs College Experience to Serve Those Close to Home

Our Nurse of the Week is Bethany Moore, a senior nursing student in the School of Nursing and Allied Health (SONAH) at Western Kentucky University (WKU), who has designed her college experience to allow her to receive her nursing degree while serving those closer to home. Her home is just across the border in Hendersonville, Tennessee, and she hopes to return there to work as a registered nurse after graduation.

Moore tells wku.edu, “The number one reason I chose WKU was because of the nursing program. They are well known for preparing their students for a successful career, and WKU was close enough to my hometown, without being too close.”

WKU’s nursing curriculum allows students to participate in simulations that imitate real-life situations and allow students to apply their classroom knowledge and build their skills. It also leaves room for error, allowing students to problem solve and make educated decisions for their patient in a simulated environment.

Moore currently works in a hospital as a nursing intern and has already applied her knowledge to real-life situations. She had a patient who had developed acute respiratory distress syndrome and had just completed a simulation with the same scenario a week before. Applying the knowledge and skills she gained in the simulation setting, Moore felt confident in contributing to the care of her patient in the real-world setting.

Moore hopes to continue her education in the future, to work toward a specialization in neonatal and pediatric care. To learn more about WKU senior nursing student Bethany Moore who designed her college experience to allow her to receive her nursing degree while serving those closer to home, visit here.

Frontier Nursing University President Dr. Susan Stone Inducted Into National Academy of Medicine

Frontier Nursing University President Dr. Susan Stone Inducted Into National Academy of Medicine

Frontier Nursing University (FNU) president Dr. Susan Stone, DNSc, CNM, FACNM, FAAN, was recently inducted into the National Academy of Medicine, one of only two nurses out of the 85 new inductees and the only inductee from Kentucky.

Being elected into the Academy is one of the highest honors in the field of health and medicine. It aims to recognize individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.

Dr. Stone’s membership was accepted due to her distinguished professional achievement in the fields of medicine and health, and her continued involvement in healthcare issues including disease prevention, education, and research. Her election recognizes Dr. Stone’s achievement in opening the door for more than 6,000 nurses to graduate and positively impact the accessibility of quality health care for rural families across the United States.

Dr. Stone tells frontier.edu, “The National Academy of Medicine offers an incredible opportunity to work collaboratively with leaders from a wide range of medical professions and disciplines. It is a tremendous honor to join this organization which is so deeply committed to improving health care.”

Dr. Stone is also a leader in developing strategies to increase the quality and capacity of midwifery and advanced practice nursing with a specific goal of improving health care for families. Since being appointed president of FNU, Dr. Stone has led the transition from a community-based school of nurse-midwifery offering a basic certificate program to an accredited university offering masters and doctoral degrees. Dr. Stone also serves as President of the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

To learn more about Frontier Nursing University president Dr. Stone who was recently inducted into the National Academy of Medicine, visit here

Jacquelyn Campbell Develops Intimate-Partner Violence Risk Assessment Training for Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Jacquelyn Campbell Develops Intimate-Partner Violence Risk Assessment Training for Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Jacquelyn Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor in the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON), has created the Danger Assessment, a groundbreaking instrument that effectively assesses the risk of an abused woman to be seriously injured or killed by her intimate partner. JHSON has signed a licensing agreement with the Veterans Administration (VA), now offering all VA clinical staff access to the Danger Assessment training.

Campbell led a training session on how to the use the instrument for 800 members of the VA’s clinical staff nationwide. VA employees can also access the training online to obtain certification and increase the amount of staff competent in the use of this evidence-based assessment. 

LeAnn Bruce, PhD, national program manager of the VA’s Intimate Partner Violence Assistance Program (IPVAP), tells newswise.com, “The VA recognizes the Danger Assessment as the gold standard of lethality assessments. This training partnership will result in the development of a cadre of clinicians throughout all VA medical centers who are extensively trained to effectively support the mission to provide ongoing education and have the means to identify those who are at risk so safety planning and intervention can be provided.”

According to Dr. Campbell, research comparing the prevalence of domestic violence/intimate partner violence between the general population and veterans is limited but studies suggest combat veterans diagnosed with PTSD have a higher prevalence of intimate partner violence than those who have not been diagnosed. The concern with intimate partner violence among veterans is not just about the prevalence but also with its potential to exacerbate other problems that veterans often face, including physical and mental well-being, homelessness, and risk of suicide and homicide.

The Danger Assessment includes a calendar to help assess the severity and frequency of battering in the past year and a 20-item instrument that uses a weighted system to score yes/no responses to risk factors associated with intimate partner homicide, including past death threats, partner’s employment status, and access to a gun. The Danger Assessment is freely available to the public but the weighted scoring instructions are reserved for individuals who have been trained and certified in the use of the Danger Assessment.  

To learn more about Johns Hopkins Nursing professor Jacquelyn Campbell’s Danger Assessment for assessing risk of intimate partner violence, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: US Marine Veteran Tori Levine Aims to Become Nurse Anesthetist for Doctors Without Borders

Nurse of the Week: US Marine Veteran Tori Levine Aims to Become Nurse Anesthetist for Doctors Without Borders

Our Nurse of the Week is Tori Levine, 22, a US Marine veteran and current nursing student at Stony Brook University who wants to become a nurse anesthetist for Doctors Without Borders.

Levine is from Dix Hills, NY, and says she knew she wanted to enlist in the military when she was nine years old. When her senior year in high school rolled around, Levine decided to defer college to enroll in the Marine Corps. She soon found herself serving as a collateral duty inspector for combat jets while deployed to the Middle East.

Levine tells news.stonybrook.edu, “I had trouble sleeping thinking about the maintenance I oversaw and imagining the worst possible cases: ‘What if something wasn’t connected right? What if the wire we repaired doesn’t hold? What if someone gets hurt? Did I make sure all of the tools were accounted for?’ With time I was able to gain confidence in myself and quit second-guessing when I know I had triple-checked it multiple times.”

Her military training eventually taught her discipline and provided her with mental jet fuel: “Being a nurse also appealed to me but I never thought I could do that because I struggled in the sciences. The military made me realize that what they say about mind over matter is true. I know now I can do it.”

After finishing her undergraduate degree, Levine eventually wants to become a nurse anesthetist and work for Doctors Without Borders. She feels she is aptly equipped to provide care and training to victims of war in the Middle East once she’s received the proper nursing training. She’s also trying to learn Russian and French, the two languages required to be accepted into Doctors Without Borders.

To learn more about Tori Levine, a US Marine veteran and current nursing student at Stony Brook University who wants to become a nurse anesthetist for Doctors Without Borders, visit here.

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