San Diego State University School of Nursing Commits to Advancing Patient Safety

San Diego State University School of Nursing Commits to Advancing Patient Safety

The San Diego State University (SDSU) School of Nursing has adopted a newly established patient safety curriculum aimed at reducing preventable deaths in hospitals as part of their commitment to advancing patient safety.

SDSU Nursing has joined a movement to help eliminate preventable errors, incorporating it into the basic education of health care professionals. Medical errors can be life threatening and often cost a hospital hundreds of thousands of dollars that insurers won’t cover.

SDSU is one of the first four organizations in the world to commit to an established patient-safety curriculum that begins in the freshman year and continues through graduate studies. The goal is to have students well-versed in patient safety and medical error prevention concepts before they set foot in a hospital.

The curriculum being implemented at SDSU was developed by an Irvine-based non-profit organization called the Patient Safety Movement Foundation. The foundation estimates more than 200,000 people die every year in US hospitals from causes that include infections, medication errors, and falls. The curriculum addresses issues that span technology, health care systems, teamwork, communication and more, to advance a culture of safety. The curriculum reinforces behaviors and tools specifically aimed at eliminating preventable medical errors.

School of Nursing Director Philip Greiner, who served on the committee that developed the curriculum, tells newscenter.sdsu.edu, “Patient safety is a critical concern. Patients should not die because of things we do.”

To learn more about the newly established patient safety curriculum being implemented in the San Diego State University School of Nursing to reduce preventable deaths in hospitals and advance patient safety, visit here

University of Virginia Names Pamela Cipriano Interim School of Nursing Dean

University of Virginia Names Pamela Cipriano Interim School of Nursing Dean

The University of Virginia has named Pamela F. Cipriano, PhD, RN, FAAN, the interim dean of the School of Nursing. She is currently a member of the school’s research faculty and has served two terms as the president of the American Nurses Association from 2014 until December 2018. She will assume her new position on August 1 and serve as interim dean until a permanent successor is named.

Cipriano has held a 40-year career in nursing with a focus on improving the quality and safety of services and the work environment for all staff. She has extensive experience as an academic medical center executive and previously served nine years as the chief clinical officer/chief nursing officer in the UVA Health System where she was responsible for inpatient and outpatient clinical services. The Health System was named an American Nurses Credentialing Center “Magnet” designation in 2006 under Cipriano’s leadership. 

Cipriano is well known for being an advocate for quality and growing nursing’s influence on health care policy and efforts to advance the role and visibility of nurses. She served as a public sector adviser in the US delegation to the 69th World Health Assembly in 2016 and currently serves as the first vice president of the International Council of Nurses.

UVA President Jim Ryan tells news.virginia.edu, “I want to thank Pam Cipriano for her incredible service, and for her willingness to step into this new role. Pam is a nationally recognized leader in nursing, and she’s been a strong advocate for nurses and patients alike for decades. While it will be difficult for anyone to follow Dorrie Fontaine, I know Pam will do a fantastic job, and I look forward to working with her.”

To learn more about Pamela Cipriano who has been named interim dean of the University of Virginia School of Nursing, visit here

American Academy of Nursing Names Professor Gina Bryan to 2019 Class of Fellows

American Academy of Nursing Names Professor Gina Bryan to 2019 Class of Fellows

The American Academy of Nursing has named Gina Bryan, a professor in the University of Wisconsin–Madison (UW–Madison) School of Nursing and a leading state and national policy expert on the opioid crisis and addiction, to its 2019 class of fellows. Being named a fellow in the academy is one of nursing’s highest honors and is reserved for nurses who demonstrate a sustained and significant impact on the profession.

Bryan is a psychiatric advanced practice nurse. She directs the UW–Madison School of Nursing’s post-graduate psychiatric nurse certificate program as well as the psychiatric mental health track of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree program. She also teaches in both graduate and undergraduate programs at the School of Nursing and in the School of Pharmacy.

Bryan has spent her career working to expand access to mental health care, particularly by arguing for the removal of legal barriers that limit advanced nurses from practicing to the full extent of their education and licensure. These legal restrictions prevent advanced practice nurses from playing a bigger role in meeting mental health needs in Wisconsin. She has also secured grants to fund programs to expand opioid recovery services in underserved areas, to train students on addiction detection strategies, and to support faculty recruitment and financial aid for graduate students pursuing careers in psychiatric nursing.

Linda D. Scott, dean and professor of the UW–Madison School of Nursing, tells news.wisc.edu, “In addition to the quality of her direct instruction and mentoring as a faculty member at the School of Nursing, Dr. Bryan exemplifies the role of a nurse leader whose work improves health access and outcomes. Her advocacy and voice representing nursing are critical to conversations that improve mental health. Dr. Bryan’s significant contributions to the field in practice, education, and policy are worthy of induction to the academy, which is our profession’s highest honor.”

According to news.wisc.edu, Bryan is a national expert on medical and nursing ethics and serves on the National Academy of Science, Engineering, and Medicine’s committee reviewing the federal Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act. She joins 231 new fellows who will be inducted at the academy’s annual policy conference in October.

To learn more about Gina Bryan, a professor in the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Nursing and a leading state and national policy expert on the opioid crisis and addiction, who was recently named an American Academy of Nursing 2019 fellow, visit here

Rutgers University–Camden Receives Funding to Prepare Military Veterans for Civilian Careers as Nurses

Rutgers University–Camden Receives Funding to Prepare Military Veterans for Civilian Careers as Nurses

Rutgers University–Camden recently announced a new program which will prepare military veterans for civilian careers as nurses who will care specifically for other veterans. The program is funded by a three-year, nearly $1.5 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Military veterans are uniquely equipped to care for other veterans thanks to their shared experiences like overseas deployments, a demanding lifestyle, and challenges such as health problems or needing to find a new career when they transition to civilian life.

The new program being offered at Rutgers University–Camden is the only program of its kind in the Delaware Valley and the state of New Jersey. The program is called Veteran Nurses in Primary Care and focuses on understanding veterans and preparing veterans for a career as a civilian. The program will also focus on providing education to community-based primary-care registered nurses and other clinicians, nursing faculty, and clinical instructors to help meet the needs of veteran clients.

Kevin Emmons, a Rutgers School of Nursing–Camden clinical associate professor and a U.S. Army veteran who currently serves as a member of the Army Reserve, tells news.camden.rutgers.edu, “We recognized a need for health-care services for veterans that would help bridge the relationship between them and the health-care provider. One of the best ways to do that is by having the health-care provider, and in this case the nurse, be a veteran themselves. This can instantly build a bond between the veteran client and nurse.”

Applications are currently being accepted for the first cohort of students who will begin taking classes in the fall semester. The first cohort will include eight students, the second year of the program will increase the number of students to 12, and the third year of the program will accept 18 students. 

Rutgers University–Camden is the only higher education institution in New Jersey to earn the distinction of being named as a Purple Heart University by the Military Order of the Purple Heart. The honor recognizes the university for its services to veterans and their families. Veterans participating in the program will receive comprehensive support to assist them in their students, including mentors and advisors from the School of Nursing and the university’s Office of Veterans Affairs.

Rutgers School of Nursing–Camden students usually perform their clinical rotations in community and hospital settings, but through the Veteran Nurses in Primary Care program, students will learn while working at the Camden County Department of Health and Human Services, Cooper University Hospital, the VA Medical Center in Philadelphia, and Volunteers of America’s Home of the Brave program.

To learn more about the Rutgers University–Camden’s new program which will prepare military veterans for civilian careers as nurses who will care specifically for other veterans, visit here

Nurse of the Week: Bethany Baker Becomes First Deaf Nursing Student to Be Admitted to UNF Nursing

Nurse of the Week: Bethany Baker Becomes First Deaf Nursing Student to Be Admitted to UNF Nursing

Our Nurse of the Week is Bethany Baker, the first deaf nursing student to be admitted to the University of North Florida’s (UNF) School of Nursing. Baker comes from a family of nurses, and although every person on her mom’s side of the family is deaf in one ear, she was the first in her family to be born fully deaf. Her deafness kept her from imagining a career in nursing for herself, but at 27 years old, she is working toward a post-baccalaureate degree in nursing and she hopes to pave the way for others to follow in her footsteps.

Baker’s parents discovered she couldn’t hear when she was 6 months old. She graduated from the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind in 2009 and attended Gallaudet University in Washington, DC, to pursue a degree in history. After graduating, she moved to Tennessee where she started caring for a 96-year-old deaf woman, called Mama Ray, which inspired her to pursue a career in the medical field.

While working for Mama Ray, Baker took a certified nursing assistant class and worked in an emergency room for six months. After Mama Ray died in 2016 at almost 100 years old, Baker moved back to Florida to enroll in a nursing program. Baker has one year left in the program and then she hopes to become a labor and delivery nurses or operating room nurse. She also wants to work with more deaf patients in Florida and advocate for deaf people who want to pursue any profession.

Baker is currently completing her clinical rounds at Flagler Hospital where she has two interpreters with her at all times, provided by the UNF Disability Resource Center. Her time as a nursing assistant in Tennessee and as a student doing clinical rounds has led her to become an advocate for deaf patients. One man in particular affected her deeply. At the hospital in Tennessee, Baker met with a patient who was going to have open heart surgery but had no interpreter. He had no information on the surgery he was going to have or the pre- and post-operation processes. She doesn’t want to see other patients with disabilities going through the healthcare system completely in the dark.

Baker’s nursing experience has also taught her how to communicate with patients in different ways. She carries a pager for nurses to contact her and uses a tablet to access a remote sign language interpreter to talk to patients when an interpreter isn’t available in-person. She also convinced the hospital she worked at in Tennessee to hire her interpreter who now remains on staff working with deaf, blind, deaf and blind, and other handicapped patients.

Baker tells houstonchronicle.com, “For deaf people, I’m hoping to start this process and experiences and do great, and then I can really open some doors permanently for some other deaf people to get their foot in the medical door. I’m really happy that the program took a risk on me. I feel more empowered to do a good job. I know that I can do it, and I want to show them that I can do it as well.”

To learn more about Bethany Baker, the first deaf nursing student to be admitted to the University of North Florida’s (UNF) School of Nursing, visit here.

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