Arizona State University to Rename College of Nursing After Receiving $50 Million Donation to Fund Dementia Research

Arizona State University to Rename College of Nursing After Receiving $50 Million Donation to Fund Dementia Research

Arizona State University (ASU) has recently received a $50 million donation to support research into dementia. The donation came from Charlene and J. Orin Edson, and the ASU College of Nursing will appropriately be renamed the Edson College of Nursing and Health Innovation. 

The gift is one of the largest in the university’s history. $25 million of the donation will go to ASU’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation and $25 million will go to the Biodesign Institute. The funding going to the College of Nursing will fund research and education on dementia causes and care. A new center will also be built and named the Grace Center for Innovation in Nursing Education, named for Charlene’s mother who was a nurse. 

The Edson’s have previously donated to ASU and their gifts currently total more than $65 million. The Edson family released a statement saying, “We believe in ASU’s interdisciplinary, collaborative approach to finding solutions. We look forward to new discoveries and solutions to better the quality of life for people affected by brain disease and the heartache of those that love them.”

The Edson’s gift will allow ASU to bring people from varied disciplines together to advance research and treatment and attempt to find a cure for dementia. The funding will go toward two focuses: one on causes and diagnosis of dementia and the other on ways to help dementia patients, their caregivers, and their families. The university already has a vested interest in dementia research but the donation will help the College of Nursing attract new talent and host an annual international symposium. 

To learn more about the $50 million donation to the Arizona State University College of Nursing to fund dementia research, visit here

Nurse of the Week: Mark Casanova Set to Become First Latino Male Nursing Graduate at IU-Bloomington

Nurse of the Week: Mark Casanova Set to Become First Latino Male Nursing Graduate at IU-Bloomington

Our Nurse of the Week is Mark Casanova, a senior in the Indiana University (IU) Bloomington School of Nursing, who is set to become the school’s first Latino male nursing graduate. He is set to graduate this May and hopes his story will help inspire other people of color to not let anything stop their dreams.

Casanova tells IDSNews.com that he will never forget when he first realized the meaning of being a nurse. He was in nursing school, observing a cesarean section during his junior year, where he saw the doctor deliver two babies. He still remembers the mother’s face when she held her twin girls for the first time and it opened his eyes to the effect he could have on patients. Thanks to his clinical experience in nursing school, Casanova has decided to start in a medical-surgical unit after graduation.

According to Casanova, he has known he wanted to do something medical since he was a kid, but discovered in high school that he really wanted to pursue a nursing career. Working in hospitals as a nursing student has only strengthened his desire to become one. Casanova says he is attracted to nursing because it allows him to get to know people and gain medical knowledge. 

Being the first Latino male nurse to graduate from the IU School of Nursing is a story Casanova will share with his kids one day and he hopes that his story will also help inspire other people of color to not let anything stop their dreams.

To learn more about IU-Bloomington’s first Latino male nursing graduate, Mark Casanova, visit here

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Improves Nursing Education in Jamaica

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Improves Nursing Education in Jamaica

The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing is making an impact on future nurses outside the United States by partnering with the World Health Organization Collaborating Center at the University of West Indies–Mona Campus in Kingston, Jamaica, to improve how they train future nurses.

UAB instructors traveled to Jamaica to train nursing instructors at the University of West Indies–Mona in 2018 and focused on how to teach with simulations. They also provided training in specialized areas including palliative and end-of-life care.

Traci White, DNP, a UAB School of Nursing assistant professor who traveled to Kingston, tells UAB.edu, “Going to UWI, where there were fresh faces and you could see the changes in their teachings in a matter of days, was invigorating. The faculty were hungry to learn and receptive to what we brought to the table. It excited me to see their enthusiasm for learning.”

UAB Nursing will continue its training in Jamaica through online resources, including UAB’s “Clinical Pearls” professional development videos and virtual debriefings. Distance training will allow UAB to continue to build its support of nurse faculty at the University of West Indies, and help the School of Nursing reach its global health and sustainable development goals.

To learn more about how UAB Nursing is making an impact on future nurses outside the United States by training nurses at Jamaica’s University of West Indies–Mona Campus, visit here.

Leading Healthcare Provider HCA Healthcare Announces New Stake in Galen College of Nursing

Leading Healthcare Provider HCA Healthcare Announces New Stake in Galen College of Nursing

One of the nation’s leading healthcare providers, HCA Healthcare, announced that it will become the majority stakeholder in the parent company of Galen College of Nursing pending regulatory approval. Galen is a private nursing school based in Louisville, KY, offering online degree programs and programs across its five campuses.

The new partnership between HCA Healthcare and Galen College of Nursing will provide better access to nursing education and career development to improve patient care. The collaboration will also offer additional career development opportunities to HCA’s 94,000 registered nurses and allow the Galen College of Nursing to establish programs at the health system’s affiliated hospitals nationwide. The partnership will not involve any changes to the college’s leadership.   

As one of the largest nurse employers in the nation, HCA owns two nursing schools and five advanced nursing simulation training centers in addition to its recent partnership with Galen. The health system will invest up to an additional $300 million in benefits for its employees, including new career development opportunities for nurses.

HCA CEO Sam Hazen tells BusinessWire.com, “Nurses are the lifeblood of our organization, and we’ve been intentional about investing in nursing so they can be successful and provide the best possible patient care. Galen has an excellent reputation in nursing education, and we look forward to working with them to advance their mission and expand their programs to more of our markets.”

To learn more about leading healthcare provider HCA Healthcare’s announcement that it will become a majority stakeholder in Galen College of Nursing, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: National Academy of Medicine Names NYU Nursing Professor Allison Squires Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence

Nurse of the Week: National Academy of Medicine Names NYU Nursing Professor Allison Squires Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence

Our Nurse of the Week is Allison Squires, a professor in the NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, who has been selected as the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence for the Future of Nursing 2020-2030 Study.

The Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence program is supported by the American Academy of Nursing, the American Nurses Association, and the American Nurses Foundation. It is a year-long opportunity for a fellow of the Academy to engage with nurse leaders and other scholars at the National Academy of Medicine while helping to develop health policy at the federal level.

Squires is a global health workforce capacity-building researcher with a special interest in improving immigrant and refugee health outcomes. As the NAM Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence, Squires will examine methods for increasing interprofessional collaboration and maximizing the skills of nurses through sustainable development perspectives.

Squires stated in a press release: “I am honored to be selected for this opportunity to represent the American Academy of Nursing, the American Nurses Association, and the American Nurses Foundation while undertaking this important work at the National Academy of Medicine, in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. This is an excellent chance for me to utilize my international focus to advance NAM’s research on health equity and the sustainability of our nation’s nursing workforce.”

Squires was selected as the NAM Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence for her strong policy background and stated focus to examine and address sustainability of the workforce from the perspective of integrating social determinants of health. Her study comes at a critical time and will be vital to determining nursing’s course in the coming decades.

To learn more about NYU Professor Allison Squires who was selected as the National Academy of Medicine Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence for the Future of Nursing 2020-2030 Study, visit here.


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