University of Washington Offers Doctor of Nursing Practice and Master of Public Health Dual Degree Program

University of Washington Offers Doctor of Nursing Practice and Master of Public Health Dual Degree Program

The University of Washington (UW) has announced a new dual degree program offering a Doctorate in Nursing Practice (DNP) in Population Health and Master of Public Health (MPH) in Global Health. The three- to four-year program aims to expand the skills of public health nurses and nurse scholars to work in partnership with populations and health systems to ultimately improve access to health care and help achieve health for all.

Pamela Kohler, associate professor with the UW Departments of Global Health, Psychosocial and Community Health, and Schools of Public Health and Nursing, tells Washington.edu, “Graduates of the new concurrent degree program will be equipped to lead sustainable change in collaboration with health systems, communities, and populations; and will have the skills to evaluate program and policy impact.”

The DNP program will prepare registered nurses for advanced practice roles, nursing leadership, and the application of evidence-based decision-making models to nursing practice. The MPH in global health will provide social justice and practical skills-based frameworks for achieving health equity through partnerships with a focus on health conditions that transcend borders.

Students must complete two sets of degree requirements to earn both degrees and can apply to both programs at the same time or to the second program at a later date. To learn more about the University of Washington’s new dual degree program offering a Doctor of Nursing Practice and Master of Public Health, visit here.

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Announces New Center for Chronic Disease Management and Research

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Announces New Center for Chronic Disease Management and Research

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON) has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to launch a new Center for Chronic Disease Management and Research. The center will advance science in supporting patients with multiple chronic conditions and provide an opportunity for researchers to drive culture change and develop sustainable health care initiatives through innovative research design.

The new PROMOTE (Promoting Resilience in Persons with Multiple Chronic Conditions) Center will focus on three founding pillars: managing multiple chronic conditions, studying social determinants of health, and providing community-driven care. This will include leading a shift in current disease-specific models of care to person-centered, community-focused methods that address factors affecting health including functional limitations, family and caregiver perspectives, poverty, housing, access to food, or traumatic life events.

Sarah L. Szanton, PhD, ANP, FAAN, center director and JHSON endowed professor for health equity and social justice, tells Newswise.com, “With two out of three adults in the US experiencing multiple chronic conditions, the need for relevant research and scalable programs is urgent. Our center takes a holistic view of the person, their environment, and their goals. The center will prepare clinician-researchers to design compelling solutions that are relevant to the home, family, social, and financial ecosystems that people live in. We want to change the question from ‘what is the matter?’ to ‘what matters most’ to the patient.”

PROMOTE will use a framework with a heavy emphasis on health resilience and recovery and simultaneously influence factors that increase individuals’ ability to overcome a health challenge. JHSON researchers have partnered with the Center for Social Design at the Maryland Institute College of Art to use human-centered design, which leverages experience and feedback of patients and caregivers to better develop and test ideas.

To learn more about the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing’s new Center for Chronic Disease Management and Research, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Brigit Carter, Associate Dean in the Duke University School of Nursing, Heads Program for Underrepresented Minorities

Nurse of the Week: Brigit Carter, Associate Dean in the Duke University School of Nursing, Heads Program for Underrepresented Minorities

Our Nurse of the Week is Brigit Carter, Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion in the Duke University School of Nursing, who is leading diversity efforts by heading a program for underrepresented minorities.

Carter’s role is focused on making the School of Nursing a welcoming and inclusive place for employees and students by meeting with members from other departments to form strategies that encourage an affirming atmosphere. She has used a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration to fund the School of Nursing’s Academy for Academic and Social Enrichment and Health Equity Academy over the last decade.

Duke nursing students from underrepresented minority groups take part in the academy to study social determinants of health. The Health Equity Academy ultimately aims to understand how to best serve patients from a variety of backgrounds.

Carter tells Today.Duke.edu, “We want to be known as a place where all people can come together and feel comfortable, at home and supported. I want us to be proactive in our approach to diversity and inclusion.”

Carter holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from North Carolina Central University and a Master of Science in Nursing from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She also works as a secondary clinical staff nurse in the Duke University Hospital Intensive Care Nursery where she cares for infants who were born early, born with a condition or disease at birth that requires immediate attention, or born with a pre-existing condition like genetic anomalies.

To learn more about Duke Nursing Associate Dean Brigit Carter and her role heading Duke’s program for underrepresented minorities, visit here.

Four Faculty Members of the Indiana University School of Nursing Named American Academy of Nursing Fellows

Four Faculty Members of the Indiana University School of Nursing Named American Academy of Nursing Fellows

The American Academy of Nursing (AAN) has named three current and one former faculty member of the Indiana University (IU) School of Nursing as 2018 Fellows. Lisa Carter-Harris, Wendy Miller, Joyce Pittman, and former faculty member Kimberly Harper will be inducted as fellows during AAN’s annual conference in November.

Robin Newhouse, dean and distinguished professor in the IU School of Nursing, tells News.IU.edu, “Our new IU School of Nursing fellows join an esteemed group of leaders past and present who have made a significant impact on nursing practice, patient care and health. On behalf of the school, I congratulate my colleagues on receiving national recognition by the academy for their outstanding contributions.”

Lisa Carter-Harris is an assistant professor whose research focuses on improving patient-provider communication and the shared decision-making process in lung cancer screening which has been used widely to help more people get early screening and treatment for lung cancer.

Wendy Miller is an associate professor and director of the Social Network Health Research Lab where she oversees interdisciplinary projects focused on capturing patient’s voices. Her research is focused on generating knowledge to advance the science in the area of chronic disease self-management with an emphasis on improving the quality of life of adults with epilepsy through patient-centered interventions.

Joyce Pittman is an adjunct assistant professor and coordinator of the Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Program at IU’s Academic Health Center where she leads a team of 10 nurses and research focused on improving the quality of life of those with wound, ostomy, and continence issues.

Kimberly Harper is chief executive officer of the Indiana Center for Nursing and serves as the nursing co-lead for the Indiana Action Coalition. She also served in a variety of roles over a 30-year period at Indiana University including nursing, marketing, and human resources leadership roles.

The American Academy of Nursing is composed of over 2,500 nurse leaders representing all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and 29 countries. To learn more about the new fellows selected from Indiana University’s School of Nursing, visit here.

University of Maine System Launches Initiative to Meet Growing Nurse Demand

University of Maine System Launches Initiative to Meet Growing Nurse Demand

The University of Maine System recently announced a five-year initiative to meet the growing need for nurses across the state. The plan would expand nursing programs in rural areas, help students pay for their education, and take other steps to fill the 3,000 nursing vacancies projected in the state by 2025.

According to PressHerald.com, Maine’s overall workforce is aging and retiring, leading to a projected 3,000 nursing vacancies by 2025. Maine’s population also leads the nation in median age, with its health needs expected to multiply. The university system is developing an initiative to double enrollment in nursing programs from 1,900 students to 3,800 in five years to counter those trends.

Chancellor James Page tells PressHerald.com, “We know there are people out there interested in a nursing career. So it’s increasing our capacity, and increasing our capacity in a way that really works with our health care partners in the industry to make sure we’re giving people the right skills in the right places.”

The university system will waive tuition for the neediest first-degree nursing students who attend its campuses in person or remotely. The system will also expand its opportunities in rural communities which have the greatest need to replace retiring nurses.

To learn more about the University of Maine System’s initiative to meet growing nurse demand in the state, visit here.

Listen to the Nursecasts Podcast on your Amazon Alexa or Echo

Launch the latest episode of Nursecasts on your smart speaker today or click below to listen online.

LISTEN ONLINE

You have Successfully Subscribed!


Gain a better understanding of the current state of the US health care system and how it might impact your work and life.

You have Successfully Subscribed!