Nurse of the Week: NYU Nursing Director Named Alzheimer’s Ambassador to New York Senator Chuck Schumer

Nurse of the Week: NYU Nursing Director Named Alzheimer’s Ambassador to New York Senator Chuck Schumer

Our Nurse of the Week is Jennifer Pettis, the associate director of the long-term care program at NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) in the New York University (NYU) College of Nursing. Pettis was recently named an Alzheimer’s Ambassador to Senator Chuck Schumer. 

Pettis is an expert on aging and healthcare. As an Alzheimer’s Ambassador, she will attend the annual Alzheimer’s Association Advocacy Forum in Washington, DC, as well as several district meetings with Senator Schumer’s office. She will also lead the activities of her local Alzheimer’s Congressional Team, a group of highly engaged advocates.

Pettis tells nursing.nyu.edu, “There are 5.8 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is expected to grow to 7.1 million by 2050. In short, Alzheimer’s disease is a public health crisis, and the time to act is now. Not only do we need to find a cure for this devastating disease, but we also need to support those afflicted by it and their caregivers as we work toward a cure. Additionally, we need to ensure that health systems are prepared to provide person-centered, quality care to individuals living with Alzheimer’s.”

Alzheimer’s Ambassadors are volunteers for the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement, working to develop and advance policies to overcome Alzheimer’s disease through increased investment in research, enhanced care, and improved support. They serve as the main point of contact for specific members of Congress for issues related to dementia and Alzheimer’s. 

Pettis joined NYU Nursing and NICHE in 2018 and brings over 25 years of healthcare experience as a nurse, nurse researcher, educator, and consultant working to improve healthcare for older adults with her. 

To learn more about Jennifer Pettis, the associate director of the long-term care program at NYU Nursing who was recently named an Alzheimer’s Ambassador to Senator Chuck Schumer, visit here.  

Ohio State University College of Nursing Announces 2019 Fuld Institute for Evidence Based Practice National Summit

Ohio State University College of Nursing Announces 2019 Fuld Institute for Evidence Based Practice National Summit

The Ohio State University (OSU) College of Nursing will be hosting its biennial Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-based Practice (EBP) in Nursing and Healthcare on November 21-22, 2019. It is a national summit series called Transforming Healthcare Through Evidence-Based Practice.

The groundbreaking event provides nursing and transdisciplinary clinicians, leaders, academicians, and researchers with the best and latest evidence to guide the highest level of practice that improves healthcare quality, safety, policy, patient outcomes, and costs. A wide range of guest speakers will cover topics including strategies for integrating EBP into academic programs, building and sustaining an EBP culture and environment, using EBP to guide organizational and health policy, using evidence to inform consumer decision making, and dissemination and implementation of research to rapidly move evidence-based interventions into real-world clinical settings.

This year’s keynote speaker is Victor Montori, MD, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic. Montori is an endocrinologist and health services researcher, and the author of more than 600 peer-reviewed publications. He is also a senior advisor for the Center for Evidence and Practice Improvement at the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research of the US Government.

To learn more about Ohio State University Nursing’s biennial Fuld Institute for Evidence Based Practice National Summit happening in November 2019, visit here.

Columbia Nursing Professor Sarah Collins Rossetti Receives Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

Columbia Nursing Professor Sarah Collins Rossetti Receives Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

Columbia University recently announced that Sarah Collins Rossetti, an assistant professor of biomedical informatics and nursing, has received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE is bestowed by the US government on outstanding scientists and engineers who are beginning their independent research careers and who show exceptional promise for leadership in science and technology.

Rossetti was honored with the award on July 25th in Washington DC. Her nomination for the PECASE came from the National Institutes of Nursing Research (NINR), a part of the National Institutes of Health. She tells nursing.columbia.edu:

“It is truly humbling to be recognized among many of my scientist peers from so many disciplines. We strive to ensure that the frontiers of scientific knowledge continue to advance and be of service to all our communities. My hope is that my work continues to help nurses, patients, all clinicians, and the health care system so that we are delivering the highest quality care to patients possible.”

PECASE was established in 1996 and now serves to acknowledge the contributions scientists and engineers have made to the advancement of science, technology, education, and mathematics education and to community service as demonstrated through scientific leadership, public education, and community outreach.

To learn more about Sarah Collins Rossetti, an assistant professor of biomedical informatics and nursing at Columbia University who was recently awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), visit here.

Indiana University School of Nursing Faculty Awarded $2 Million Grant for Chronic Disease Management Research

Indiana University School of Nursing Faculty Awarded $2 Million Grant for Chronic Disease Management Research

Two School of Nursing faculty members from Indiana University (IU) have been award a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop nurse scientists dedicated to looking for new ways to manage serious chronic diseases.

The program will be run by nurse researchers Susan Rawl and Susan Pressler. They have designed the program to train nurses who have completed their master’s or PhD in nursing with an interest in conducting scientific research and reporting their findings.

Rawl tells insideindianabusiness.com, “It gives them the knowledge and skills to pursue cutting-edge science to help patients and families self-manage chronic conditions.”

Nurse researchers who participate in the program will be tasked with looking for new ways to prevent and manage the care of patients who suffer from long-term health conditions like cancer, heart failure, and Alzheimer’s disease. The $2 million in grant funding will go toward a fellowship program for new predoctoral and postdoctoral students. After completing the program, nurse researchers will be able to develop and apply frameworks that guide research and develop interventions in those serious health cases.

To learn more about the $2 million grant awarded to nursing faculty in the Indiana University School of Nursing to help fund chronic disease management research, visit here.

Samford University’s Ida Moffett School of Nursing Receives $3.5M Nurse Practitioner Residency Grant

Samford University’s Ida Moffett School of Nursing Receives $3.5M Nurse Practitioner Residency Grant

Samford University’s Ida Moffett School of Nursing recently received a four-year, $3.5 million grant to help the university place nurse practitioner graduates in rural, underserved areas for primary care residency.

The nurse residency program is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Advanced Nursing Education – Nurse Practitioner Residency Program Grant, which is designed to prepare new nurse practitioners to deliver high-quality primary care in community-based settings. The primary care residency is a year-long program in which nurse practitioner residents will complete academic coursework and clinical hours in rural and underserved areas.

Nena Sanders, vice provost of the Samford University College of Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Nursing, tells alabamanewscenter.com, “For nearly 100 years, Ida Moffett School of Nursing has prepared well-equipped, compassionate nurses to serve the underserved. This grant affords us the opportunity to enhance the knowledge and skill sets of our graduates and intentionally place caring, competent nurse practitioners where the needs are greatest.”

The grant will facilitate the launch of the primary care nurse residency which will be housed in the School of Nursing. The program will focus on developing new family nurse practitioners with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to improve the quality and safety of rural health care systems.

Out of 67 counties in Alabama, 55 of them are considered rural and only two of those 55 are considered to have the minimum number of providers available. During their rotations, residents will receive training in vital telehealth technology to help reduce accessibility issues for patients who are forced to travel long distances to seek necessary care.

To learn more about the four-year, $3.5 million grant awarded to Samford University’s Ida Moffett School of Nursing  to help the university place nurse practitioner graduates in rural, underserved areas for primary care residency, visit here.

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