Nurse of the Week: Baylor Nursing Graduate Amanda Ward Braswell Selected for Fulbright Grant to India

Nurse of the Week: Baylor Nursing Graduate Amanda Ward Braswell Selected for Fulbright Grant to India

Our Nurse of the Week is Amanda Ward Braswell, a 2017 graduate from Baylor University’s Louise Herrington School of Nursing and recent recipient of a Fulbright grant to India. The Fulbright Program is an international educational exchange program sponsored by the US government to increase mutual understanding between people of the US and people of other countries.

Beginning in the fall, Braswell will temporarily leave her post as a registered nurse in the Bone Marrow Transplant unit at Medical City Dallas to live in Bengaluru, India, on the Bangalore Baptist Hospital (BBH)/Rebekah Ann Naylor School of Nursing (RANSON) campus. Braswell will conduct her research project with residents from DJ Halli, the largest slum in Bangalore, where rates of illiteracy and a variety of health disparities run high.

Braswell tells Baylor.edu, “The No. 1 cause of death in India is non-communicable disease, such as cardiovascular disease, and this is something that can be prevented if people have the knowledge about modifying certain aspects of their diet, for example. So my project will study the perception of food, dietary habits and the accessibility of food and find the link to cardiovascular disease with the goal of bridging the knowledge gap.”

Braswell became interested in Bengaluru, India on a mission trip in July 2017 with two of her nursing professors and a few peers from Baylor’s nursing program. Through a partnership with BBH/RANSON, Braswell and colleagues taught 200 nurses at the hospital how to initiate intravenous punctures while reducing the risk for infection and conducted research on the effectiveness of their teaching.

After finishing her Fulbright year, Braswell hopes to publish her research findings and return to Medical City Dallas, with graduate school a strong possibility in the future. Braswell is considering earning her DNP or PhD while continuing in the field of nursing research.

To learn more about Braswell’s work as a Fulbright scholar in India and future plans for her career in nursing, visit here.

Arizona State University Elevates Healthcare in Rural Arizona Through New Partnership

Arizona State University Elevates Healthcare in Rural Arizona Through New Partnership

Arizona State University (ASU) and Eastern Arizona College (EAC) have partnered to create a concurrent enrollment program that allows students to earn their bachelor’s degree from ASU while studying at EAC’s campus in Thatcher, Arizona.

The partnership between EAC and ASU, called the EAC-ASU Baccalaureate Nursing Program, allows students to take class for both their associate and bachelor’s degrees at the same time. It is a quicker, cheaper, and more flexible option than other traditional nursing education tracks, offering hybrid courses that allow students to do their work online at their own pace but ask professors questions in person.

Program director Carolyn McCormies tells ASUNow.ASU.edu, “Research shows that patient outcomes are better when nurses have a higher level of education, but many nurses with associate degrees find it very difficult to go back to school once they start working or have families. Our graduates have the opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree along with their associate. The whole community benefits from having a program like this in their midst.”

A main goal of the program is to ensure that skilled healthcare professionals and quality care aren’t lost to bigger cities. ASU and EAC aim to keep graduates of the program in rural areas. Each semester, students in the program are required to complete 10 hours of community service as well as four hours of “leadership time” mentoring underclassmen.

To learn more about Arizona State University’s partnership with Eastern Arizona College to encourage nurses to work in rural areas, visit here.

George Washington University School of Nursing Outlines Steps to Raise Research Profile

George Washington University School of Nursing Outlines Steps to Raise Research Profile

The George Washington University (GW) School of Nursing has recently outlined a plan to raise its research profile and institute a “students-first” program. The university’s focus on collaborating and student input is the first step in the right direction toward advancing their research goals within the next three years.

GW Nursing’s strategic plan outlines publication goals for faculty and encourages collaboration between staff and faculty to lead a research-oriented culture in the nursing school. The school will also establish a research award given to a faculty member who considers diversity in their work through researching underrepresented populations or through service activities.

Pamela Jeffries, dean of the GW School of Nursing, tells GWHatchet.com, “Over the next three years and beyond, we will continue to build our research portfolio and provide support for our researchers within the school and their collaborators in order to continue to grow in our research profile, funding and stature.”

Additional steps to help raise the school’s research profile include implementing a policy task force to assess the school’s current administrative policies in order to see what needs to be updated or included. GW Nursing wants to ensure inclusive policies that will move the school toward its desired trajectory.

GW Nursing has also launched a well-being program to teach students how to cope with stress, and is working to diversity the student body to include more male and minority students in the female-dominated profession.

To learn more about GW Nursing’s newly outlined plan to raise the school’s research profile, visit here.

Loyola University Chicago and Orbis Education Celebrate Opening of State-of-the-Art Nursing Facility

Loyola University Chicago and Orbis Education Celebrate Opening of State-of-the-Art Nursing Facility

Loyola University Chicago and Orbis Education recently commemorated the successful launch of a new, hybrid Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN) program during the grand opening of the university’s state-of-the-art nursing facility located in Downers Grove, IL.

Loyola has graduated students from its 16-month ABSN program for over 25 years. Now in partnership with Orbis Education, Loyola offers a hybrid ABSN program to meet the diverse scheduling needs and learning preferences of today’s students. Classes began in January 2018 for the inaugural class of 34 students.

Loyola’s hybrid program features the same accredited nursing curriculum as Loyola’s on-campus version but relies on an interactive e-Learning platform developed by Orbis to educate students on nursing fundamentals and theories. Students in the hybrid program take the foundational knowledge they learn online and turn it into quality patient care under guidance of faculty at the Downers Grove facility and top healthcare facilities across the Chicago metropolitan area.

Dr. Vicki Keough, dean of the Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing at Loyola University Chicago, tells PRNewswire.com, “As we considered expanding our nursing program with Orbis Education, we realized they were a lot like us. They embraced our mission and commitment to Cura Personalis – care of the entire person. And they were intensely focused on academic quality and student outcomes.”

The Downers Grove facility is equipped and funded by Orbis Education. It includes state-of-the-art nursing labs that replicate the clinical setting and feature full-body patient simulators and contemporary hospital equipment. The labs provide a contextual learning environment where students can hone their clinical skills in a manner that will complement their clinical learning experiences in healthcare and community organizations in the local area.

To learn more about Loyola University Chicago and Orbis Education’s new partnership, visit here.

University of Wyoming Nursing Professor Holly Miller Receives Outstanding Career Achievement Award

University of Wyoming Nursing Professor Holly Miller Receives Outstanding Career Achievement Award

University of Wyoming (UW) nursing professor Holly Miller was recently awarded the UW College of Health Sciences (CHS) Outstanding Career Achievement Award. Miller is the current director of the Basic BSN and Accelerated BRAND nursing programs at the UW Fay W. Whitney School of Nursing.

After 30 years experience in nursing education, all at UW, Miller received her award at the CHS recognition event in April and will retire from teaching this month. Miller began her employment in the UW School of Nursing in 1988 and eventually became director of the Basic BSN and BRAND programs and the Clinical Simulation Center coordinator.

During her career at UW, Miller was instrumental in designing and setting up the state-of-the-art simulation center when the school moved to its present location in 2005. She has also used her knowledge of nursing education and simulation to recruit several classes of students over the years.

Most recently, Miller has led her undergraduate teaching colleagues in the development of coursework for the new statewide curriculum, Revolutionizing Nursing Education in Wyoming (ReNEW) program. She continues to support implementation of the new curriculum.

Miller is a member of the Wyoming Nurses Association, American Nurses Association, and the local chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society. To learn more about her career as a nursing educator at the University of Wyoming, visit here.

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