Nurse of the Week: Labor and Delivery Nurse Sharon Fickley Delivers Three of Her Own Grandchildren in 36 Hours

Nurse of the Week: Labor and Delivery Nurse Sharon Fickley Delivers Three of Her Own Grandchildren in 36 Hours

Our Nurse of the Week is Sharon Fickley, a Labor and Delivery nurse at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital who recently delivered three of her own grandchildren over the course of 36 hours. Fickley has been delivering babies for over 25 years, but delivering her own grandchildren was a truly special experience. 

Fickley began her nursing career at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital and her coworkers have since become like family to her. Their bond was put to the test when Fickley’s grandchildren were born at the same hospital over a 36 hour period. 

Nurse Samantha Spiker, who helped with the delivery, tells nbc29.com, “As soon as the babies were born she had turned around and started crying – we all started crying because it was just one of those moments.”

Fickley says she and her family weren’t sure when the babies would be born. They knew their births would all be close but had no idea they would be as close as 36 hours apart. The three babies included two twin boys and one girl who were all born healthy. Fickley now has 8 grandchildren. 

To learn more about Sharon Fickley, a Labor and Delivery nurse at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital who recently delivered three of her own grandchildren over the course of 36 hours, visit here

UT Tyler Expands Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program to Address Nursing Shortage

UT Tyler Expands Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program to Address Nursing Shortage

The University of Texas (UT) at Tyler recently announced that it will be expanding its Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program to accept more students in an effort to address the shortage of nurses in Texas and beyond.

From 2011-2018, the School of Nursing admitted 2,116 students while turning away 2,361 qualified applicants due to a lack of space and faculty. The expansion of the BSN program will allow for an additional 180 students to be admitted each academic year and will also accelerate the rate at which the program produces nurses into the workforce.

Dr. Barbara Haas, School of Nursing executive director, tells news-journal.com, “With the expansion, students will graduate an entire semester earlier than was possible under the previous model. Not only will we be able to accept more applicants, but we will also get them out into the workforce faster.”

Beginning in spring 2020, the program will offer a 12-month, year-round BSN program which will be made up of three 15-week semesters. Applicants will be admitted in the fall, spring, and summer semesters, and attend full-time for four consecutive semesters.

To learn more about UT Tyler’s announcement to expand its Bachelor of Science in Nursing program to accept more students in an effort to address the shortage of nurses in Texas and beyond, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: UT College of Nursing Alumna Sara Croley Gives College’s Largest Ever Donation to ‘Invest In the Future of Nursing’

Nurse of the Week: UT College of Nursing Alumna Sara Croley Gives College’s Largest Ever Donation to ‘Invest In the Future of Nursing’

Our Nurse of the Week is Sara Croley, a University of Tennessee (UT) College of Nursing alumna who recently gave a $7.5 million donation to the university, making it the largest donation in the college’s history. Croley hopes her donation will go toward ‘investing in the future of nursing,’ ultimately helping to decrease the burden of current nationwide nursing shortages. The donation was made in partnership with Croley’s husband, Ross Croley.

According to UT officials, $5.5 million of the donation will support the College of Nursing’s building renovations, and $2 million will establish the Sara Rosenbalm Croley Endowed Dean’s Chair. The $60 million renovation project will allow the college to increase enrollment. The college has had to turn away qualified applicants in the past due to a lack of space and resources.

Croley tells WBIR.com, “Having worked as a nurse for many years, I have cared for people during some of their most difficult moments. Nurses play such an important role in people’s lives. Ross and I are investing in the future of nursing in Tennessee. We hope this gift opens a door of opportunity for many more amazing nurses to enter the workforce.”

The US Bureau of Labor predicts a nationwide shortage of 1.2 million registered nurses between 2014 and 2022. According to UT, the majority of Bachelor of Science in Nursing students work in Tennessee after graduation, with an estimated 45 to 60 percent remaining in the Knoxville area specifically. Pending approval from the UT Board of Trustees, the renovated nursing building will be named the Croley Nursing Building. It’s projected to be about 100,000 square feet, more than twice the size of the current building.

To learn more about Sara Croley, a University of Tennessee College of Nursing alumna who recently gave a $7.5 million donation to the university to ‘invest in the future of nursing,’ visit here.

Nurse of the Week: ICU Nurse Mady Howard Credits Career with Helping Her Train for American Ninja Warrior

Nurse of the Week: ICU Nurse Mady Howard Credits Career with Helping Her Train for American Ninja Warrior

Our Nurse of the Week is Mady Howard, an intensive care unit (ICU) nurse at Intermountain Healthcare’s Dixie Regional Medical Center in St. George, Utah, who says the unpredictable nature of working in the ICU helped her train to be on ‘American Ninja Warrior.’

Howard advanced to the ‘American Ninja Warrior’ finals in Las Vegas during filming in August, and competed to win the $1 million grand prize. The final four episodes aired throughout September, and although Howard didn’t win, she says she will be back for more in the future.

Her collegiate career as a gymnast helped Howard prepare physically, but she says the intensity of being an ICU nurse has prepared her mentally for the challenge of competing on a reality competition show. Contestants aren’t allowed to practice on the ninja warrior course so their first time on the course is in front of an audience as they make split-second decisions in high-pressure situations on an unfamiliar course. To Howard, it feels much like her day-to-day job in the ICU.

Howard tells modernhealthcare.com, “Life can change so quickly and it motivated me to not stand still and be grateful for every moment I have.”

Finding a passion outside of her demanding 12-hour shifts in the ICU has also helped Howard become a better healthcare provider. She finds fulfillment in the training and it makes her a more confident provider for her vulnerable patients.

To learn more about Mady Howard, an ICU nurse who says the unpredictable nature of working in the ICU helped her train to be on ‘American Ninja Warrior,’ visit here.

University at Buffalo School of Nursing Receives $1.35 Million Grant to Increase Number of Behavioral Health Professionals

University at Buffalo School of Nursing Receives $1.35 Million Grant to Increase Number of Behavioral Health Professionals

The University at Buffalo (UB) School of Nursing has received a $1.35 million grant which will help increase the number of behavioral health professionals treating opioid and other substance use disorders in Western New York.

The three-year grant was provided by the US Health Resources and Services Administration and will allow UB to train over 50 students studying psychiatric mental health nursing, psychology, social work, and more. UB will partner with nine local primary and behavioral health care sites to launch the Opioid Workforce Expansion Program (OWEP), an interdisciplinary, state-of-the-art addictions training program.

Yu-Ping Chang, PhD, principal investigator on the grant, associate dean for research and scholarship, and Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Endowed Professor in the UB School of Nursing, tells buffalo.edu, “This grant fosters academic and practice partnerships with experts in addictions care in an effort to create a cohesive and interdisciplinary addiction training program. Aside from the benefit to our students, our clinical partners will also have access to enhanced addictions offerings and opportunities to consult with experts either in-person or using telehealth technology.”

According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine, nearly 259 million opioid pain medication prescriptions were written in 2012. Opioid death rates in Western New York are among the highest in the state, and vulnerable communities in the region lack access to addiction treatment and care. By leveraging relationships with community partners, OWEP aims to ultimately place behavioral health professionals at care sites in these communities.

To learn more about the $1.35 million grant awarded to the University at Buffalo School of Nursing to increase the number of behavioral health professionals treating opioid and other substance use disorders in Western New York, visit here.

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