GW Nursing Students Teach Middle Schoolers About Heart Health

GW Nursing Students Teach Middle Schoolers About Heart Health

Students from the George Washington University (GW) School of Nursing have recently completed the school’s first installation of a two-month program teaching DC middle schoolers about heart disease and healthy living.

The program was funded by a grant from the Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation which partnered GW Nursing with the AnBryce Foundation, a nonprofit that focuses on community-building for middle school students. Eleven students in the nursing school have attended the Saturday Institute at Thurgood Marshall Academy every week since September to teach children how to keep their hearts healthy and how social factors can impact their health.

Karen Dawn, co-principal investigator of the program and an assistant professor of nursing, said people in the county where the middle school is located die 10 to 15 years earlier than people living in other areas in DC, highlighting the importance of teaching children that diet, exercise, genetics, and location all impact heart health, and children should start eating foods that are good for the heart and stay physically active at an early age to prevent heart disease.

Dawn tells GWHatchet.com, “Our job in the School of Nursing, especially mine being the director of community health and public health for the undergraduates, is to make sure we’re helping people in the communities that we work in. We don’t just teach our students, we want them to be able to go out and help the communities and see some sustainability there.”

The program has helped middle school students understand that factors outside their control – like not having access to parks, sidewalks, or grocery stores – impact how they stay healthy. The GW nursing students worked with the middle school students to teach heart-healthy practices through interactive activities like watching videos and playing games.

To learn more about GW Nursing’s two-month program to teach DC middle schoolers about heart disease and healthy living, visit here.

University of Maryland School of Nursing and Howard Community College Sign Dual-Admission Agreement

University of Maryland School of Nursing and Howard Community College Sign Dual-Admission Agreement

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) and Howard Community College (HCC) have signed an agreement of dual admission ensuring a smooth transition from HCC’s Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program to UMSON’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program.

The agreement will allow students to apply and be admitted to UMSON’s BSN program while in HCC’s ADN program. Students will receive transfer credits from UMSON for coursework completed at HCC and will be granted special student status to take UMSON courses while still working on their associate degree.

Georgene Butler, PhD, professor and dean of health sciences at HCC, tells UMaryland.edu, “The dual admission partnership is a tremendous value to Howard Community College students, allowing them to progress toward their associate degree and begin the process of attaining their baccalaureate degree in nursing. This new educational option will make the path to a bachelor’s degree more affordable for students and their families.”

The dual admission agreement is an effort by both nursing schools to increase the number of qualified nursing candidates. The agreement also helps UMSON further its mission of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, an initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the AARP to advance comprehensive health care change.

To learn more about the dual admission agreement between the University of Maryland School of Nursing and Howard Community College, visit here.

Nurses of the Week: UCLA Nursing Professors Christine Samuel-Nakamura and Mary Rezk-Hanna Pursue Work Inspired by Their Heritage

Nurses of the Week: UCLA Nursing Professors Christine Samuel-Nakamura and Mary Rezk-Hanna Pursue Work Inspired by Their Heritage

Our Nurses of the Week are UCLA School of Nursing professors Christine Samuel-Nakamura and Mary Rezk-Hanna who have both received grants from the UCLA Academic Senate Council on Research to conduct research projects inspired by their heritage. After earning their doctorate degrees at UCLA Nursing, both nurses were welcomed as assistant professors at the university.

Samuel-Nakamura grew up on the Diné (the indigenous name for Navajo) Nation reservation in New Mexico where she was the youngest child in a large family that raised its own livestock and crops. Her experience growing up on the reservation made Samuel-Nakamura aware of the challenges facing her tribe, including poverty and chronic health problems like diabetes and cardiovascular disease. She later decided to help address these issues by becoming a nurse.

Samuel-Nakamura earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing at the University of New Mexico, then pursued her Family Nurse Practitioner Master of Science in Nursing degree at UCLA. She tells Newsroom.UCLA.edu:

“I wanted to be able to work with communities on their health issues and empower people to help themselves…As a researcher, you investigate and explore what you see in clinical practice and develop some type of explanation for it and find a way to address it. Clinical practice informs research which, in turn, informs clinical practice.”

Samuel-Nakamura worked for several years in the clinical setting in the federally run Indian Health Service and in tribal hospital clinics on the Diné reservation in Arizona where community elders appreciated her ability to speak with them in their native tongue. She recently received two one-year grants to re-evaluate environmentally contaminated sites in Los Angeles County (home to the largest urban American Indian population in the United States). One grant comes from the American Indian Studies Center in the UCLA Institute of American Cultures and the second is from the UCLA Academic Senate Council on Research.

Mary Rezk-Hanna found inspiration for her research program growing up in Alexandria, Egypt, where both of her parents worked as physicians. She shadowed them as they treated patients, which influenced her decision to become a nurse. One thing she remembers from growing up in Alexandria is looking down from her apartment balcony and being fascinated by the popular hookah cafes across the street.

Rezk-Hanna’s family moved to the US when she was 13 and she later earned her associate degree in nursing and worked as a registered nurse where she became interested in the physiological effects of smoking in young adults with tobacco-related illnesses. She then obtained her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from George Mason University, and while pursuing a Family Nurse Practitioner Master of Science degree at UCLA, she was selected to conduct a community research project about a local population health concern.

Rezk-Hanna found that two of the largest hookah lounges in LA are within one mile of UCLA and considered a major community health concern. She noticed most customers were young adults, with a large portion of them being females, and decided to conduct a study to assess young adult hookah smokers’ attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs toward their choice of smoking, and to identify predictors of hookah smoking. She found that the majority of subjects believed that hookah smoking is not harmful to one’s health.

Rezk-Hanna tells Newsroom.UCLA.edu, “These data could be used to inform young adults about the dangers of hookah smoking as well as provide evidence to guide policy specific to hookah and other alternative tobacco products and nicotine delivery systems.”

Rezk-Hanna is building on her recent findings by studying other evolving hookah tobacco products and their effects on heart health. She has received three grants to investigate the potential cardiovascular toxicity of electronic hookah use among young adults: one from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, one from the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute, and one from the UCLA Academic Senate Council on Research.

To learn more about UCLA Nursing professors Christine Samuel-Nakamura and Mary Rezk-Hanna and how their heritage has inspired their research, visit here.

George Washington University Nursing Faculty Give Back to University at Highest Rate of All Schools

George Washington University Nursing Faculty Give Back to University at Highest Rate of All Schools

The George Washington University (GW) has found that faculty from the School of Nursing donate to the university at the highest rate of all schools at GW.  Almost 100 percent of nursing faculty members give back to GW—more than any other school—according to Officials who spoke at a Faculty Senate meeting earlier this month.

Nursing faculty reported that they give back because they are dedicated to boosting the school’s resources and funds, which allow officials to proceed with renovations, including a recent renovation to the school’s lab spaces and updated training equipment. University spokesman Tim Pierce says many faculty members donate to the nursing school, including giving on an ongoing basis through payroll deduction. Pamela Jeffries, dean of the GW School of Nursing, has been a strong advocate for encouraging faculty to provide philanthropic support.

Pierce tells GWHatchet.com, “Faculty donors at GW Nursing support the school’s mission to train the next generation of nursing leaders and to improve patient care in local and global communities. Their giving reflects the strong affinity and commitment the faculty has for the school.”

Faculty donations go toward academic programs, partnerships, teaching resources, and research for the nursing schools. GW Nursing’s recently unveiled simulation lab space and student success center located in the nursing school’s flagship building are powerful examples of how philanthropic support can lead to better student and faculty resources.

To learn more about the George Washington University School of Nursing faculty who give back to the university at a higher rate than any other school, visit here.

Pittsburg State University Receives $800,000 Grant to Fund Sexual Assault Nurse Training

Pittsburg State University Receives $800,000 Grant to Fund Sexual Assault Nurse Training

Pittsburg State University’s (PSU) Irene Ransom Bradley School of Nursing has received a federal nursing grant to fund its Advanced Nurse Education Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) program. The $800,288 grant will be distributed over three years, and PSU is one of 19 institutions to receive the federal grant.

The grant was announced by Senator Jerry Moran (R.-Kansas) who lauded PSU for its commitment to equipping healthcare professionals to care for victims of sexual assault. He tells MorningSun.net, “This place is a role model for Kansans. The school’s ability to bring federal grant dollars back to Kansas is extremely valuable, and the grants announced today will empower nurses to advance their education and place an emphasis on serving communities in need of their skills.”

SANE nurses are registered nurses who have completed specialized education in medical forensic care of patients who have experienced sexual abuse. There is currently only one SANE nurse serving Crawford County. PSU alum Wendy Overstreet will use her expertise to serve as coordinator for the SANE Program at PSU.

Overstreet has limited her care to pediatric patients because she is the only SANE nurse in the area. Adults over the age of 17 are sent to other counties, and sometimes other states to be examined, which can come at great personal and financial cost. She hopes that having more SANE nurses will help keep victims in the county and lead to an increase in incident report and follow through on prosecution. The university hopes to eventually expand sexual assault nurse examiner access to eight surrounding counties.

To learn more about Pittsburg State University’s $800,000 grant to fund sexual assault nurse training, visit here.

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