Native American and Alaska Native High School Students Explore Careers in Nursing Through Summer Institute

Native American and Alaska Native High School Students Explore Careers in Nursing Through Summer Institute

Washington State University (WSU) Health Sciences Spokane has invited seventeen Native American and Alaska Native high school students from multiple states to attend the 24th annual Na-ha-shnee Summer Institute. The attendees are rising sophomore, junior, and senior students who plan to pursue careers in nursing and health science. 

The Na-ha-shnee Summer Institute is a 12-day event where students learn about a range of health science topics and receive college admissions information. They are fully immersed in scientific challenges and receive hands-on learning experiences taught by health care providers, faculty at WSU Health Sciences Spokane, and health sciences college students.

Topics covered during the Institute include anatomy, timely information on opioid addiction and response, basic nursing skills training and simulation, and a visit to the university’s pharmacy lab. Students will also receive CPR and first aid certification and are eligible to receive up to 65 Career and Technical Education (CTE) credits after completing their twelve days at the Institute.

To learn more about Washington State University’s Na-ha-shnee Summer Institute where seventeen Native American and Alaska Native high school students from multiple states have met to learn about a range of health science and nursing topics, visit here

Hospital for Special Surgery Receives Accreditation for Nurse Residency Program

Hospital for Special Surgery Receives Accreditation for Nurse Residency Program

The Nurse Residency Program at the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), the world’s largest academic medical center focused on musculoskeletal health, has received Practice Transition Accreditation from the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC).

Nurse residency programs are gaining popularity around the country, but the HSS Nurse Residency Program has been around since 2008. HSS is a leader in the field with best practices for transitioning new nurses to the bedside while supporting professional development of nursing personnel. Nurses in the accredited transition program will learn the skills and professional behaviors necessary to deliver safe and high-quality care.

Jennifer A. O’Neill, DNP, APN, NEA-BC, senior vice president, Patient Care Services and chief nursing officer at HSS, tells prnewswire.com, ”ANCC accreditation assures our nurse residents that HSS offers an elevated transition program with a clear course of instruction and reliable evaluation methods. With ANCC Accreditation, our transitioning nurses gain the skills and confidence needed to perform effectively within a new practice setting.”

The ANCC’s Practice Transition Accreditation Program (PTAP)™ is a voluntary review process that validates hospital residency programs that prepare registered nurses for new practice settings by teaching rigorous, evidence-based standards for quality and excellence. HSS was the first hospital in New York City to receive the Magnet Award for Nursing Excellence from ANCC, and the first to be re-designated with this honor four consecutive times. 

To learn more about how the Hospital for Special Surgery received accreditation for its Nurse Residency Program, visit here

University of Arkansas School of Nursing Launches New Online LPN to BSN Program

University of Arkansas School of Nursing Launches New Online LPN to BSN Program

The University of Arkansas (U of A) Eleanor Mann School of Nursing is launching a new online program for licensed practical nurses (LPNs) to complete their bachelor’s degrees in nursing (BSN). The program will begin in the fall but students can apply now. 

U of A’s new online LPN to BSN program will help meet the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation from 2015 that 80 percent of nurses in the United States hold a bachelor’s degree by 2020. The program will also benefit graduates who will become more competitive in the nursing job market and increase their earning potential. 

Susan Patton, director of the U of A School of Nursing, tells news.uark.edu, “In order to face the challenges of an aging population, a dynamic health care environment and a pending nursing shortage, the BSN degree is becoming the new standard for registered nurses. Our BSN programs are comprehensive and offer knowledge that can be applied in all health care settings such as critical care, primary care, public health and mental health.”

The new LPN to BSN program was created to meet the needs of working licensed practical nurses who require a flexible option to finish their degrees. The required clinical hours can be completed in the student’s local area to avoid travel to campus. Courses are offered in 8-week sessions each fall and spring.

To be eligible for the program, students must be a licensed practical nurse with at least 2,000 hours of work experience at the LPN level in the last 12-24 months. Applicants must also have 48 hours of prerequisite courses completed with a minimum 2.8 GPA. The program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

To learn more about the University of Arkansas Nursing’s new LPN to BSN program, visit here

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing Dedicates Atrium To Former Dean Colleen Conway-Welch

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing Dedicates Atrium To Former Dean Colleen Conway-Welch

The Vanderbilt University School of Nursing (VUSN) has named the atrium in its new building after former dean Colleen Conway-Welch, PhD, FAAN, FACNM, who served as dean for 29 years and is credited with transforming nursing education at Vanderbilt and nationally.

Linda D. Norman, DSN, FAAN, VUSN Dean and Valere Potter Menefee Professor of Nursing at VUSN, tells nursing.vanderbilt.edu, “Under Colleen’s direction, Vanderbilt School of Nursing became a leader in nursing education, practice and research. In her nearly three decades as dean, the school educated thousands of nurses who changed — and continue to change — health care at all levels and for many people. Her impact cannot be overstated.”

The atrium is part of a new $23.6 million Vanderbilt Nursing building. The atrium will serve as the main entrance to the school and connect all four of the nursing school’s buildings together. Norman thanked the trustees of Conway-Welch’s estate and the Colleen Conway-Welch Family Foundation for providing the funds for the atrium and for their vision for honoring the late dean during a dedication ceremony on June 5. 

The four-story atrium features a floor-to-roof glass wall, an artisan-crafted wall constructed from a tree removed from the site, a wide staircase designed to encourage movement and interaction, and plenty of space for student study and student-faculty engagement.

Conway-Welch served as VUSN dean from 1984 to 2013, when she retired and was named dean emerita by the university. She died from cancer in October 2018, four months before the building was completed. 

To learn more about the Vanderbilt University School of Nursing’s new nursing building featuring an atrium dedicated to former dean Colleen Conway-Welch, visit here

Nurse of the Week: UAB Nursing Professor Maria Shirey, PhD, Named AONE Nurse Researcher of the Year

Nurse of the Week: UAB Nursing Professor Maria Shirey, PhD, Named AONE Nurse Researcher of the Year

Our Nurse of the Week is Maria Shirey, PhD, a professor and associate dean for Clinical and Global Partnerships at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing who was recently named the American Organization of Nurse Executives Foundation (AONE) Nurse Researcher of the Year. The award recognizes her outstanding contributions to nursing and health systems research.

Shirey has been recognized internationally for her research in nursing leadership and management. Her research has addressed multiple AONE priorities, including developing core competencies of nurse leaders across the care continuum to support current and emerging roles; supporting the design and implementation of care delivery and health management models; and supporting the provision of safe, quality care and delivery systems grounded in healthful practice.

Shirey tells uab.edu, “My research has identified the systems and support structures nurse managers need in order to be successful in their roles. Nurse managers are crucial because they lead from the middle. They’re the voice that really articulates the mission and vision of an organization in ways that benefit the patients and families we serve.”

Shirey’s role as a professor and associate dean in the UAB School of Nursing has had tremendous impacts on the program. Her work as a principal investigator on a four-year, $2.8 million Health Resources and Services Administration grant project to develop a resilient primary care registered nurse workforce has helped develop a new generation of RNs who will work in medically underserved areas and work toward chronic disease prevention and control. She has also been instrumental in opening a nurse-managed, interprofessional transitional care clinic for heart failure patients.

According to uab.edu, Shirey’s response to receiving the AONE Nurse Researcher of the Year award was, “For me, receiving the AONE nurse researcher award is an incredible honor. It’s recognition of the value and impact of my work over a long and productive career. This is an award for which I was nominated by colleagues in my field, and that makes it even more special.”

To learn more about Maria Shirey, PhD, a professor and associate dean for Clinical and Global Partnerships at the UAB School of Nursing who was recently named the AONE Nurse Researcher of the Year, visit here.

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