Children’s Hospital Colorado’s Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Fellowship Program Receives ANCC Accreditation

Children’s Hospital Colorado’s Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Fellowship Program Receives ANCC Accreditation

Children’s Hospital Colorado recently received Accreditation with Distinction from the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) for its Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (NNP) Fellowship Program, becoming the first ANCC Accredited NNP program in the country.

The ANCC Practice Transition Accreditation program is dedicated to validating hospital residency and fellowship programs that help transition registered nurses (RNs) and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) into new practice settings that meet rigorous, evidence-based standards for quality and excellence. APRNs in the NNP Fellowship program at Children’s Hospital Colorado are part of an elite program that promotes the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors necessary to deliver the safest and highest-quality care.

Pat Givens, Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Executive for Children’s Colorado, tells eurekalert.org, “We are extremely proud that Children’s Hospital Colorado’s Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Fellowship is recognized by ANCC as one of the highest-quality transition programs in the country for NNPs. The accreditation provides the patients and families we serve across the state and region with the reassurance that our neonatal nurse practitioners are some of the most highly trained in the country.”

Children’s Hospital Colorado is one of the nation’s leading and most expansive pediatric healthcare systems with a mission to improve the health of children through patient care, education, research, and advocacy. To learn more about Children’s Hospital Colorado’s recent accreditation approval for its Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Fellowship program, visit here.

Loma Linda University School of Nursing Receives $2.6M Grant to Grow Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Program

Loma Linda University School of Nursing Receives $2.6M Grant to Grow Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Program

The Loma Linda University School of Nursing has been awarded a four-year, $2.6 million grant from the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to help grow the number of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in Southern California.

The grant is funded by the HHS’s Advanced Education Nursing Grant Program and will provide funding toward tuition assistance for qualifying students and enhanced training. The school recently received confirmation of the funding for year one of the 4-year grant.

Gloria Mattson Huerta, DNP, Nurse Practitioner program coordinator and assistant professor in the Loma Linda University School of Nursing, tells news.llu.edu, “This grant will allow us to update and enhance the training provided to students. This will include the development of standardized patient scenarios focusing on behavioral health issues, as well as managing the opioid crisis — both of which are significant issues in the Inland Empire as well as nationally.”

Pete Aguilar, representative for California’s 31st US Congressional District, has promoted adding HHS funding to provide high-quality affordable healthcare in the state’s medically-underserved communities. He believes that increasing the number of highly-qualified nurses in the region can help ensure better health outcomes for our communities. He tells news.llu.edu, “I’m proud to announce this funding, and I look forward to a continued partnership with Loma Linda University in order to increase access to quality health care throughout San Bernardino County.”

To learn more about the four-year, $2.6 million grant awarded to the Loma Linda University School of Nursing to help grow the number of advanced practice registered nurses in Southern California, visit here.

Chamberlain University Helps Address Nursing Shortage With Thousands of New Graduates Nationwide

Chamberlain University Helps Address Nursing Shortage With Thousands of New Graduates Nationwide

Chamberlain University has the largest nursing school in the country and is the largest provider of BSN degrees to underrepresented minority students in the US. The university is working to help address nursing and healthcare provider shortages and recently announced the graduation of more than 13,000 nurses from the 2018-2019 academic year. Those graduates spanned 20 campuses in 14 states. Of those graduates, 10,100 earned bachelor’s degrees and 3,700 earned master’s and doctoral degrees.

According to businesswire.com, the nursing shortage across the country is projected to be at 1 million by 2030 due to an aging patient population, greater focus on preventive care, and a gap between the number of nurse retirees and new nurses. Nursing schools are struggling to meet the demand and had to turn away over 75,000 qualified applicants in 2018 due to lack of space and qualified nurse educators.

Dr. Karen Cox, PhD, RN, FACHE, FAAN, president of Chamberlain University, tells businesswire.com, “There are many areas of the country that will continue to suffer from nursing shortages for some time and this will ultimately affect patient care. Chamberlain University’s size and modalities of learning make nursing education accessible. We are committed to educating exceptional individuals who can help address these shortages and make a difference in the healthcare of the patients they serve.”

Chamberlain offers several nursing degree programs and specialty tracks designed to meet nurses wherever they are in their career. Nursing students are provided with an education framework that prepares them to provide exceptional levels of care at the bedside, in healthcare leadership positions, and in the education of future nurses.

To learn more about Chamberlain University’s efforts to address the nationwide nursing shortage by graduating 13,000 new nurses into the workforce during the 2018-2019 academic year, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: UAB Nursing Professor Martha Dawson Elected as President of National Black Nurses Association

Nurse of the Week: UAB Nursing Professor Martha Dawson Elected as President of National Black Nurses Association

Our Nurse of the Week is Martha Dawson, DNP, an assistant professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing who has been elected to serve as president of the National Black Nurses Association (NBNA), Inc.

Dawson will serve a two-year term as the organization’s 13th president. She was recently sworn in during the annual NBNA Institute and Conference in New Orleans in late July. She is also a member of the Birmingham Black Nurses Association chapter of NBNA.

According to birminghamtimes.com, the NBNA’s mission is “to serve as the voice for black nurses and diverse populations ensuring equal access to professional development, promoting educational opportunities and improving health.”

Dawson’s career in nursing spans more than 40 years. She is a two-time graduate of the UAB School of Nursing and a member of the UAB School of Nursing faculty since 2008. She has led the highly ranked graduate nursing administration specialty track at UAB and served in a number of roles, including principal investigator for a Health Resources and Services Administration workforce investment grant.

Dawson tells birminghamtimes.com, “I am prepared, ready and willing to serve and guide NBNA into the future and place the organization on the global stage as knowledgeable, professional nursing leaders. I firmly support NBNA’s commitment to serve African American communities, increase the number of African American nurses, and improve equity, equality and inclusivity in health education, service, practice and research.”

The NBNA was created by Dr. Lauranne Sams, former dean of the Tuskegee University School of Nursing, in 1971. It is a nonprofit organization, which represents 150,000 African American registered nurses, licensed vocational/practical nurses, nursing students, and retired nurses from the US, Eastern Caribbean, and Africa, with 92 chartered chapters in 35 states.

To learn more about Martha Dawson, DNP, an assistant professor at the UAB School of Nursing who has been elected to serve as president of the National Black Nurses Association, visit here.

University of Rhode Island College of Nursing Receives $2.7M HRSA Grant For Advanced Nursing Education Workforce Program

University of Rhode Island College of Nursing Receives $2.7M HRSA Grant For Advanced Nursing Education Workforce Program

The University of Rhode Island (URI) College of Nursing recently received a $2.7 million, four-year grant aimed at enhancing the nursing workforce and strengthening health care in the community. The grant will allow URI Nursing students to get more hands-on experience, benefiting patients at local community health centers at the same time.

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has provided the grant in an effort to fuel its Advanced Nursing Education Workforce (ANEW) program, which enhances the academic clinical partnerships between the College and two community health centers—Thundermist Health Center and Providence Community Health Center. With help from the grant, URI nursing students in the Adult Gerontology, Psychiatric Mental Health, and Family Nurse Practitioner programs, based at the Nursing Education Center in Providence, will be placed in the health centers to provide primary care and behavioral health services, under the supervision of professionals in the centers.

The HRSA grant provides funding for traineeships and will pay the tuition of 14 nursing students in the program each year. Associate Nursing Professor Denisa Coppa expects 48 to 56 students will be placed in one or both of the centers over the four-year period, each working two days a week, while maintaining their studies as full-time students.

Coppa tells today.uri.edu, “This program will give experience to these nurse practitioner students so they are prepared to work in community health centers when they graduate…This project is a huge benefit not just for the students, but for practicing health care providers and the health care system as a whole. We’re increasing and transforming the health care workforce to provide more primary care services for the medically underserved population.”

To learn more about the $2.7 million, four-year HRSA grant awarded to the University of Rhode Island  College of Nursing to help enhance the nursing workforce and strengthen health care in the community, visit here.

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