University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Nursing Receives $150,000 to Support Nursing Scholars

University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Nursing Receives $150,000 to Support Nursing Scholars

The University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene (SONDH) recently received $150,000 in funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to support its Future of Nursing Scholars program. SONDH was one of 31 schools selected to receive the award, which will go toward tuition, fees, and living expenses for two PhD nursing students over the three-year program.

Mary G. Boland, professor and dean of SONDH, tells Hawaii.edu, “UH Manoa nursing is committed to increasing the number of PhD-prepared nurses, and the redesigned PhD program is more competitive while providing financial support and academic mentorship to ensure student achievement and success.”

Students enrolled in the program will receive a graduate research assistantship position and work closely with an advisor who will assure opportunities for engagement in research, scholarship, and academic advising.

The Institute of Medicine recommended that the US double the number of nurses with doctorates in a landmark nursing report, and while enrollment in Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs has increased exponentially, PhD enrollment has nott seen the same level of growth. RWJF’s Future of Nursing Scholars program was designed in response to this data to help increase the number of PhD-prepared nurses and ensure that more nurses are conducting vital research and helping to address the nurse faculty shortage. At the conclusion of the Future of Nursing Scholars program, RWJF will have graduated more than 200 PhD-prepared nurses.

To learn more about why the University of Hawaii at Manoa received $150,000 in funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to support its nursing PhD program, visit here.

Nurses of the Week: University of Arizona Nurses Jane Carrington and Kimberly Shea Take Their Work Global Thanks to the Fulbright Specialist Program

Nurses of the Week: University of Arizona Nurses Jane Carrington and Kimberly Shea Take Their Work Global Thanks to the Fulbright Specialist Program

Our Nurses of the Week are two nurses from the University of Arizona (UA) College of Nursing who recently received funding to take their work global. Jane Carrington and Kimberly Shea were awarded the opportunity to further their research and careers by becoming global ambassadors. Both nursing scholars were accepted to the Fulbright Specialist Program, a competitive program that allows them to share their knowledge with institutions around the world.

Carrington graduated from the UA College of Nursing in 2008 where she focused on informatics and healthcare technology. She is currently leading a research team on improving communication between nurses to increase patient safety, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

Shea is a nurse and scientist whose research focuses on telehealthcare in patient’s homes. She has 25 years of nursing experience and has researched the topic of telehealthcare for a decade, as well as traveled to Central America to apply and assess telehealth opportunities.

These nursing scholars are looking forward to not only providing expertise in their respective specialties, but also to using this as a chance to learn how other cultures infuse technology into their healthcare practices.

To learn more about Jane Carrington and Kimberly Shea, two nursing scholars from the University of Arizona who have been accepted to the Fulbright Specialist Program, allowing them to take their work global, visit here.

Penn Nursing Appoints Marion Leary As First Director of Innovation

Penn Nursing Appoints Marion Leary As First Director of Innovation

The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) has appointed Marion Leary, MSN, MPH, RN, FAHA, the first Director of Innovation. In her new role, Marion will design and execute innovation programs and projects through Penn Nursing’s Office of Nursing Research (ONR) and work to keep the school at the forefront of innovation in nursing.

Prior to this new appointment, Leary was an Innovation Specialist on a part-time basis in the ONR, focused on moving forward Penn Nursing’s strategic priorities in innovation. She will now join Penn Nursing full time from the Penn Center for Resuscitation Science where she has worked as a researcher since 2007.

Leary is a nursing leader in the field of CPR quality and post-cardiac arrest resuscitation care. She is also an international Fellow of the American Heart Association and has served on the American Heart Association’s Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science subcommittee.

Penn Nursing has established innovation priorities, including creating, cultivating, and growing new strategic partnerships, testing new methods to improve health and health care outcomes, and preparing students to be the next generation of nurse innovators. Leary will support Penn Nursing with her fundamental knowledge of innovation and design thinking, and will represent Penn Nursing as a leader in health and health care innovation.

Marion’s appointment was effective as of February 1, 2019. To learn more about Marion Leary, the first Director of Innovation for Penn Nursing, visit here.

New University of Alabama at Birmingham Nursing Program Addresses Need for Health Care in Rural and Underserved Communities

New University of Alabama at Birmingham Nursing Program Addresses Need for Health Care in Rural and Underserved Communities

A new nursing program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is aiming to improve access to quality health care in rural and underserved communities. Alabama has a shortage of primary and specialty health care providers, and according to the Bureau of Health Workforce, 66 of 67 counties in the state lack enough dentists and mental health care providers to meet population needs.

The new program will provide 111 students from across the state with firsthand training on how to provide care in rural and underserved areas. The students are from multiple universities and have been selected to participate in the first class of Alabama Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) scholars. The scholars come from a wide range of backgrounds including medicine, nursing, dentistry, pharmacology, social work, and education.

Students in the program will learn about rural medicine and how to serve underserved communities both in and out of the classroom by participating in service projects. UAB plans to train, place, and keep students with varying backgrounds in underserved areas to ensure adequate health care is provided to all people across the state. Diversity is crucial to improving access to health care, which is why UAB has recruited a diverse new cohort of students.

Michael Faircloth, MD, the director of the Alabama Area Health Education Centers program and the medical and lab director of Student Health Services at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, tells UAB.edu, “The focus of the program is to take students who are pursuing careers in various health professions and make sure they receive a portion of their clinical training in rural and underserved areas. Many people think of doctors and nurses when they hear the term health professions, but a successful health care workforce needs more than doctors and nurses. It needs dentists, psychologists, pharmacists, social workers and technologists.”

UAB’s new Alabama Area Health Education Centers scholars will be enrolled in the program for two years, working with leaders in the state’s five AHEC regions. To learn more about UAB’s new program to address health care needs in rural and underserved communities across Alabama, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: ICU Nurse Kristina Dejesus Helps Save Her Own Life After Losing Arm

Nurse of the Week: ICU Nurse Kristina Dejesus Helps Save Her Own Life After Losing Arm

Our Nurse of the Week is Kristina Dejesus, an ICU nurse from New Jersey who helped save her own life after losing her arm in a boat propeller accident.

Dejesus was on a trip to Texas with her friends in October 2017 when tragedy struck during a boat trip on Lake Travis. A strong current pulled her into contact with a boat propeller, but she didn’t realize she had lost her limb until she was pulled from the water by two witnesses who had military experience. Her professional instincts took over immediately and she began instructing her friends on what to do, effectively helping to save her own life.

Dejesus tells FoxNews.com, “I’m an ICU nurse and I knew I had to lie flat with my legs up and put pressure on my wound. It was at this point I realized I didn’t have an arm. I couldn’t believe it. I was lucky because my wound was not bleeding heavily. My artery had been kinked and it was a clean cut.”

Recognizing the severity of the situation, Dejesus instructed her friends to put pressure on her wound while she was taken to an ambulance waiting on shore, then airlifted to Dell Seton Medical Center for emergency surgery. She went into surgery and woke up intubated, sedated, and on life support.

Dejesus was eventually transferred home to New Jersey where she underwent weeks of physical and occupational therapy and received a prosthetic arm. She has since resumed working at Overlook Hospital and returned to the lake with her friends on the one-year anniversary of her accident to gain closure and celebrate life with those who helped save her.

To learn more about ICU nurse Kristina Dejesus who helped save her own life after losing her arm in a tragic boat propeller accident, visit here.


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