Chamberlain Nursing Students Treat Patients in Kenya

Chamberlain Nursing Students Treat Patients in Kenya

Chamberlain University College of Nursing students recently completed a two-week trip to Kenya as part of the Global Health Education Program. The program, which has been in existence for 23 years, provides Chamberlain nursing students the opportunity to put their nursing skills and education to use in different countries, like Haiti, Kenya, Brazil, and India.

Third year nursing student Christopher Monzon chose to travel to Kenya for his GHEP trip earlier this fall, working alongside local nurses and nursing students in five cities: Mukuru, Koch, Babadongo, Kamahuha, and Maasai Mara. The nursing groups helped provide healthcare and assistance in a variety of ways, treating around 400 patients per day. “Maasai Mara, located near the Tanzania and Kenya border, had a high number of patients with malaria so they needed anti-malarial medications and disease education,” Monzon said. “However, the tribe did not believe in vaccinations so we used a special plant called Artemisia annua to treat the patients. We also taught this tribe how to search for clean water, another serious issue in the region.”

Chamberlain’s Global Health Education Program partners with different organizations in each country, such as Family Hope Charity in Kenya and Hope for Hansan’s in India. Dr. Susan Fletcher, chair of the GHEP, works with her faculty to ensure that even with varying healthcare needs, every community is helped. Dr. Fletcher told DailyNurse.com: “The program’s focus across the board is health promotion and disease prevention with an emphasis on sustainability.”

Monzon and other students were partnered each day with translators and Thika medical students to diagnose patients, distribute treatment and medication, or travel to homes of bed-ridden patients. Because the students treated so many patients each day with limited time, they sharpened and honed their interview skills to figure out symptoms and appropriate treatments. But each team learned many valuable skills from working closely together. “For example, a Thika medical student taught me how to diagnose Rickets, a disease I had never encountered prior to the trip,” Monzon told DailyNurse.com. “Then I was able to teach the Thika students how to properly take a patient’s vital signs which they then took over for us while we were interviewing patients in clinics.”

These GHEP trips fill the Chamberlain College of Nursing requirement for the campus-based community health course, while providing students the opportunity to broaden their education outside of the United States. Program requirements include a 3.0 GPA, faculty recommendation letters, and an application with the campus president’s signature. Chamberlain also provides 10-12 scholarships annually for students requiring financial aid for these trips.

These trips are invaluable for Chamberlain students, as they not only practice their nursing skills and gain new healthcare skills, but get to treat patients from very different backgrounds. “Before leaving for Kenya, I wanted to be a travel nurse,” Monzon said. “Now I want to be an international nurse to help more people like those I met in Kenya.”

To learn more about the Chamberlain University Global Health Education Program, click here.

New Assistant Dean of Diversity and Inclusion at Vanderbilt School of Nursing

New Assistant Dean of Diversity and Inclusion at Vanderbilt School of Nursing

Earlier this fall, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing named Rolanda Johnson, PhD, MSN, as the new assistant dean for diversity and inclusion. Replacing assistant professor Jana Lauderdale in this new position, she is also continuing her roles as assistant dean for academics and associate professor of nursing. Dr. Johnson ensures VUSN continues to foster and provide an environment that is culturally appreciative and inclusive, especially for underrepresented and marginalized groups.

“We’re very fortunate to have Rolanda in this leadership role,” VUSN Dean Linda D. Norman, DSN, FAAN, shared with VUSN Communications. “With her experience in academic enhancement services, as the longtime adviser to the Black Student Nurses Association, and through her research in health promotion for African Americans and in black racial identity, Rolanda will bring expertise and wisdom to the role of VUSN’s assistant dean for diversity and inclusion.”

Dr. Johnson joined the VUSN faculty in 1998, after receiving her PhD in Nursing Science from Vanderbilt. Over her 20 years at Vanderbilt, she has served as director of the Fisk University-Vanderbilt University Nursing Partnership Program, she re-established Vanderbilt’s Black Student Nurses Association, and represented the School of Nursing in campus-wide programs such as the Provost’s Task Force on Sexual Assault, FutureVU Faculty Advisory Committee, and Diversity, Inclusion and Community Committee. Additionally, Dr. Johnson is the founding president of the Nashville Chapter of the National Black Nurses Association.

To learn more about Dr. Rolanda Johnson’s career and vision for diversity and inclusion at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, check out her Q&A at MinorityNurse.com.

Research of the Week: The Design and Testing of the Psychometric Properties of the Person Engagement Index Instrument to Measure a Person’s Capacity to Engage in Health Care

Research of the Week: The Design and Testing of the Psychometric Properties of the Person Engagement Index Instrument to Measure a Person’s Capacity to Engage in Health Care

We’re starting a new feature for DailyNurse.com called Research of the Week! We’ll be sharing relevant and interesting research articles from our journals at Springer Publishing Company that we hope you find useful and helpful in your career.

This week we’re featuring The Design and Testing of the Psychometric Properties of the Person Engagement Index Instrument to Measure a Person’s Capacity to Engage in Health Care, from the Journal of Nursing Measurement. Author Ellen Swartwout, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, provided some insight as to why the person engagement index is so crucial for patient care. Read more below:

Previous research has identified patient and family engagement as an essential element to optimize self-care management and improve patient outcomes1. Although much has been written about the importance of patient and family engagement, clinical care delivery models, processes and tools to translate patient engagement strategies into practice are needed2. In the July 2018 issue of the Journal of Nursing Measurement, the article entitled, “The Design and Testing of the Psychometric Properties of the Person Engagement Index (PEI) Instrument to Measure a Person’s Capacity to Engage in Health Care” discusses the development and testing of an instrument to measure a person’s capacity to engage in their health care3. The instrument was created based on review of the literature and underwent clinical expert review and validation prior to cognitive testing among adult medical-surgical patients. After cognitive testing, instrument items were revised to reflect patients’ feedback and tested in a multi-site research study involving four healthcare systems with five unique inpatient medical-surgical units. The PEI was developed for use in the assessment phase of the Interactive Care ModelTM — a five phase care delivery model for clinicians to use with people to engage them in their health care journey4.

 

The psychometric properties of the instrument were tested among 338 medical–surgical adult inpatients and found that four subscales comprised the total scale. Using exploratory factor analysis, four factors explained 63.9% of the total variance. The total and subscale reliability testing (Cronbach’s α) all exceeded the .70 threshold. The overall scale Cronbach’s = .896 and the four subscales corresponding Cronbach’s α were: Engagement in Health Care = .885, Technology Use in Health Care = .854, Proactive Approach to Health Care = .728, and Psychosocial Social Support = .880.

 

The results of the study indicate that the PEI is a valid and reliable instrument among the inpatient medical –surgical to measure a person’s capacity to engage in their health care. The importance of creating evidenced-based tools and resources to foster engagement and partnerships between clinicians and those they serve is an important step towards implementing patient engagement strategies. There are currently clinical and research cohorts of healthcare organizations using the PEI in clinical practice demonstration projects and formal research studies to test its use among various populations and settings.

You can read more about Dr. Swartwout’s research on the PEI here. To subscribe to the Journal of Nursing Measurement, click here.

References
  1. Hibbard, J. H., & Greene, J. (2013). What the evidence shows about patient activation: Better health outcomes and care experiences; fewer data on costs. Health Affairs, 32(2), 207–214.
  2. Carman, K.L., Dardess, P., Maurer, M.E., Workman, T., Ganachari D., & Pathak-Sen, E. A Roadmap for Patient and Family Engagement in Healthcare Practice and Research. (Prepared by the American Institutes for Research under a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Dominick Frosch, Project Officer and Fellow; Susan Baade, Program Officer.) Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation: Palo Alto, CA; September 2014. www.patientfamilyengagement.org.
  3. Swartwout, E., El-Zein, A., Barnett, S., & Drenkard, K. (2018). The design and testing of the psychometric properties of the person engagement index instrument to measure a person’s capacity to engage in health care. Journal of Nursing Measurement, 26(2), 278-295.
  4. Drenkard, K., Swartwout, E., Deyo, P., & O’Neil, M. Interactive Care Model:  A framework for more fully engaging people in their healthcare. Journal of Nursing Administration, 2015; 45(10), 503-510.
University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Opens New Facility

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Opens New Facility

The University of Alabama at Birmingham has recently opened its new state-of-the-art School of Nursing building. With a 72,000-square-foot expansion and renovation, complete with the latest technology-enhanced classrooms and competency labs, the School of Nursing building is already being put to good use by students, faculty and staff alike.

Doreen Harper, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean of the UAB School of Nursing and Fay B. Ireland endowed Chair in Nursing, says the excitement is evident as everyone discovers how to live and learn in the new facility. “Our students and faculty are learning and collaborating in open, light-filled spaces throughout the day. Classrooms are structured to engage students in flipped classrooms, using video streaming and sharing through computers and other digital devices. Faculty have their own windowed offices rather than working in groups as well as convenient conference rooms for meeting with students throughout the building.”

The technology provided within the new facility is playing a major role in furthering nursing education, research and clinical practice, by providing resources that encourage student engagement and collaboration. Classrooms have device-sharing technology, smartboards, and short throw projectors that allow students to more easily share their screens with instructors and fellow students. The Innovation Collaboratory, a special classroom within the new UAB School of Nursing facility, gives students the chance to share ideas and information through interactive workstations with streaming capabilities.

Jacqueline Moss, Ph.D, Associate Dean for Technology and Innovation in the School of Nursing, says the technology is designed to maximize interaction and engagement of students. “We are able to stream video from simulations happening in our nursing competency suites, from presenters at a distance, and engage with patients where they live. In addition, all classrooms are equipped with device sharing hardware and software that allows students to work in groups and share that work with the entire class by sharing their work on their personal computers.”

These virtual educational experiences made possible by the new technology provide education and professional development, and can be used to reach rural patients through telehealth research and clinical activities. Health care for the medically underserved in rural and urban Alabama will continue to grow and improve as a result.

Dean Harper notes that in addition to gaining new technology and space, the programs within the school are growing in response to the continuous need for highly educated, compassionate and competent nurses. “We have expanded our pre-licensure programs at the baccalaureate and master’s level to accommodate more than 60 new nursing pre-licensure students annually. Likewise, given the critical need for nursing administrators, managers, informaticians and executive leaders, our nursing health care systems major is being tailored to recruit nursing leaders and innovators from across the nation. We have also developed new coursework in perioperative nursing, transplant nursing, design thinking and biomedical informatics research to be offered.”

To learn more about the new, expanded UAB School of Nursing building, click here.

New Paramedic-to-Nursing Program Approved for Robeson Community College

New Paramedic-to-Nursing Program Approved for Robeson Community College

Robeson Community College’s new nursing program was recently approved by the North Carolina Board of Nursing, ahead of its start in summer 2019.

RCC’s Paramedic to RN Bridge program is designed for paramedics to obtain an Associate Degree in Nursing. This program allows paramedics to study for three years at Robeson; Robeson ADN recipients can continue studying at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke for another year to earn a Bachelor Degree in Nursing.

Interest in the program, including 5,000 hits on Facebook alone, has been steady ­— no doubt reflecting a need for this nursing education need in North Carolina. Eva Meekins, Nursing Department Director at Robeson Community College, tells The Robesonian, “We are one of the few schools in the state that offer a paramedic to ADN program. We don’t have the capacity to meet the demand.”

The bridge program is set up so students can get certified as paramedics through Robeson and start their medical careers, earning and saving money. This will provide the financial freedom some students need to continue pursuing their education. And though many people are interested in joining the new nursing program at Robeson, there will still be plenty of local paramedics who continue their careers without pursing a nursing degree.

For more information about Robeson Community College and its new Paramedic to RN Bridge program, click here.

Listen to the Nursecasts Podcast on your Amazon Alexa or Echo

Launch the latest episode of Nursecasts on your smart speaker today or click below to listen online.

LISTEN ONLINE

You have Successfully Subscribed!


Gain a better understanding of the current state of the US health care system and how it might impact your work and life.

You have Successfully Subscribed!