Arizona State University and Phoenix Children’s Hospital Collaborate to Launch Pediatric-Specific Nursing Programs

Arizona State University and Phoenix Children’s Hospital Collaborate to Launch Pediatric-Specific Nursing Programs

A new partnership between the Arizona State University (ASU) Edson College of Nursing and Health Innovation and Phoenix Children’s Hospital will create new opportunities for ASU nursing students to fill the nursing workforce pipeline with nurses specialized in pediatric care. The partnership has created a first-of-its-kind pediatric Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) for undergraduate, pre-licensure nursing students.

The ASU-Phoenix Children’s collaboration has also allowed for the development of the Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program and Certificate Program curriculum for graduate-level nursing students. The DNP program launched in fall 2018 and the DEU began in spring 2019 with an inaugural cohort of 8 students.

One of those students, Jessica Wald, tells asunow.asu.edu, “For those of us in the DEU program, we felt a greater sense of accountability and responsibility for our patients. For example, we were all assigned our own computer logins, so we did patient charting under our own names.”

The DEU is structured to give students pediatric-focused clinical hours at the patient bedside at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. It’s a competitive program that requires students to apply for the program and take it as an elective course during their junior year. The specialized training helps develop nurses who are confident in their ability to care for pediatric populations.

Arizona is expected to see a shortage of 28,000 nurses by 2025 with the biggest gaps in specialized areas like neonatal intensive care. ASU’s partnership with Phoenix Children’s Hospital is part of an ongoing effort to prepare specialized workforce-ready nurses at the undergraduate level.

To learn more about the new partnership between Arizona State University and Phoenix Children’s Hospital to launch pediatric-specific nursing programs, visit here.

Arizona State University and Phoenix Children’s Hospital Announce New Partnership to Help Prepare Future Pediatric Nurses

Arizona State University and Phoenix Children’s Hospital Announce New Partnership to Help Prepare Future Pediatric Nurses

Arizona State University’s (ASU) Edson College of Nursing and Health Innovation has announced a new strategic partnership with Phoenix Children’s Hospital to develop pre-licensure and graduate-level programs that will enhance the preparation of Arizona’s future pediatric nurses. 

Leaders from both institutions recently formed a joint operating committee to enhance education, research efforts, and train the next generation of pediatric clinical talent. ASU’s Edson College of Nursing created a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) for pre-licensure nursing students and collaborated on the development of the Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and Certificate Program Curriculum for graduate-level nursing students.

Julie Bowman, Chief Nursing Officer at Phoenix Children’s, tells PRNewswire.com, “Our primary goal is to develop high quality, nationally renowned pediatric nursing programs that offer students increased time at the pediatric patient bedside. A DEU like the one at Phoenix Children’s is one of the first of its kind in pediatrics, and this program helps develop ‘workforce ready’ nurses who are confident in their ability to work with young patients.”

The new DEU program includes a pediatric elective with course credits for pre-licensure nursing students interested in pediatric care, and gives students a total of 72 focused hours of time at the patient bedside at Phoenix Children’s. The program sets students up for success by pairing them with a dedicated Phoenix Children’s nurse preceptor for students to shadow for six full nursing shifts. Hospital staff also gain early insights into prospective nurses who may wish to join the Phoenix Children’s team. 

To complete the program, students complete a major intervention project where they identify an issue in patient care, conduct ongoing research, and implement a solution within a department. Their insights and research outcomes become a crucial part of the Phoenix Children’s care model. This gives ASU nursing students an opportunity to learn nurse management and improve pediatric care on a broad scale in one of the fastest growing cities in the US.

To learn more about the new partnership between the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Phoenix Children’s Hospital to help prepare future pediatric nurses, visit here

Arizona State University to Rename College of Nursing After Receiving $50 Million Donation to Fund Dementia Research

Arizona State University to Rename College of Nursing After Receiving $50 Million Donation to Fund Dementia Research

Arizona State University (ASU) has recently received a $50 million donation to support research into dementia. The donation came from Charlene and J. Orin Edson, and the ASU College of Nursing will appropriately be renamed the Edson College of Nursing and Health Innovation. 

The gift is one of the largest in the university’s history. $25 million of the donation will go to ASU’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation and $25 million will go to the Biodesign Institute. The funding going to the College of Nursing will fund research and education on dementia causes and care. A new center will also be built and named the Grace Center for Innovation in Nursing Education, named for Charlene’s mother who was a nurse. 

The Edson’s have previously donated to ASU and their gifts currently total more than $65 million. The Edson family released a statement saying, “We believe in ASU’s interdisciplinary, collaborative approach to finding solutions. We look forward to new discoveries and solutions to better the quality of life for people affected by brain disease and the heartache of those that love them.”

The Edson’s gift will allow ASU to bring people from varied disciplines together to advance research and treatment and attempt to find a cure for dementia. The funding will go toward two focuses: one on causes and diagnosis of dementia and the other on ways to help dementia patients, their caregivers, and their families. The university already has a vested interest in dementia research but the donation will help the College of Nursing attract new talent and host an annual international symposium. 

To learn more about the $50 million donation to the Arizona State University College of Nursing to fund dementia research, visit here

HEALab Provides ASU Health Students Path to Combine Healthcare and Business

HEALab Provides ASU Health Students Path to Combine Healthcare and Business

Arizona State University is helping more students pursuing health-related degrees to marry their knowledge and curriculum with entrepreneurship, in order to help them forge stronger paths in their healthcare careers. The ASU Health Entrepreneur Accelerator Lab (HEALab) program helps teach students to think up new solutions, design a business model, and apply to the ASU Venture Devils Program for further mentorship and funding.  

While their Tempe campus has hosted their business, engineering, and design schools for a long time, the health-centered colleges are based in the downtown Phoenix and West campuses. Combining the resources and strengths from these schools and ASU’s office of Entrepreneurship and Innovation creates opportunities for nursing and health students pursuing their bachelors and masters degrees, both in the classroom and in the workplace.

From Classroom to Competition to Career

Students are already showing major successes from the program, as shared by the Phoenix Business Journal. Ramona Ramadas, who has been pursuing her Masters in Healthcare Innovation through ASU’s online courses, recently competed in the Nurse-Pitch competition at the 2019 Healthcare and Management Systems Society conference and placed third. Her startup, New Trails Navigators, is an AI-driven platform designed to train incarcerated inmates, prepping to release and re-enter the workforce, to begin a career in healthcare. The mentoring and networking Ms. Ramada has been able to gain through the HEALab has helped her win three additional competitions and awards, including the Pakis Social Entrepreneurship Challenge and the Alliance for the American Dream.

In addition to being a resource for Arizona State students, the HEALab has been used by students at other schools. Back in February, students from Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine visited the lab and other school campuses and centers, through a week long Entrepreneurship and Innovation selective with Dr. Rick Hall, CONHI’s Senior Director of Health Innovation. These students used applied human-centered design techniques and lean startup business tools to develop application ideas.

The HEALab offers monthly guest speakers and one-on-one mentoring to all ASU community members, faculty, and students, including those from different campuses, and those taking online coursework. For more information about the HEALab, click here.

Correction, March 27, 2019: We initially reported that New Trails Navigators works with newly incarcerated inmates, instead of inmates who are preparing to release and re-enter the workforce. We have edited the article to reflect this correction.

Nurses of the Week: University of Arizona Nurses Jane Carrington and Kimberly Shea Take Their Work Global Thanks to the Fulbright Specialist Program

Nurses of the Week: University of Arizona Nurses Jane Carrington and Kimberly Shea Take Their Work Global Thanks to the Fulbright Specialist Program

Our Nurses of the Week are two nurses from the University of Arizona (UA) College of Nursing who recently received funding to take their work global. Jane Carrington and Kimberly Shea were awarded the opportunity to further their research and careers by becoming global ambassadors. Both nursing scholars were accepted to the Fulbright Specialist Program, a competitive program that allows them to share their knowledge with institutions around the world.

Carrington graduated from the UA College of Nursing in 2008 where she focused on informatics and healthcare technology. She is currently leading a research team on improving communication between nurses to increase patient safety, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

Shea is a nurse and scientist whose research focuses on telehealthcare in patient’s homes. She has 25 years of nursing experience and has researched the topic of telehealthcare for a decade, as well as traveled to Central America to apply and assess telehealth opportunities.

These nursing scholars are looking forward to not only providing expertise in their respective specialties, but also to using this as a chance to learn how other cultures infuse technology into their healthcare practices.

To learn more about Jane Carrington and Kimberly Shea, two nursing scholars from the University of Arizona who have been accepted to the Fulbright Specialist Program, allowing them to take their work global, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: University of Arizona Clinical Nurse Instructor Sheri Carson Develops Child Abuse Screening Program

Nurse of the Week: University of Arizona Clinical Nurse Instructor Sheri Carson Develops Child Abuse Screening Program

Our Nurse of the Week is Sheri Carson, a clinical instructor in the University of Arizona (UA) College of Nursing who developed a child abuse screening program to help emergency room nurses recognize the signs of abuse early on.

Children are in and out of emergency rooms every day for accidents and illnesses, but Carson is concerned with those who come in with abuse-related injuries. The US has no standardized screening process to identify the early signs of child abuse in emergency departments across the country, which results in many cases of physical child abuse going unnoticed.

Carson has been dedicated to pediatrics since she graduated from nursing school and after learning the statistics of missed child abuse cases in emergency rooms, Carson sought to improve them.

She tells wildcat.arizona.edu, “I always dreamed about being a mom, but I wasn’t blessed with children. When I see children—who I think are a gift—that are experiencing abuse, it just pulls at my heartstrings like nothing else.”

Carson has spent the last few years researching and developing an evidence-based screening program to catch signs of child abuse early on. In November she was named Pediatric Nurse Practitioner of the Year by the Arizona chapter of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners in honor of her work.

According to The Daily Wildcat, 11 to 64 percent of child abuse cases go undetected by healthcare providers — 35 to 50 percent of children in missed cases are at risk for future injuries from abuse, and 10 to 30 percent will die from of those injuries. There are protocols in place to treat child abuse once it’s been identified, but Carson’s concern is with the cases of missed abuse, which she hopes to capture more often by implementing proper screening.

To learn more about Sheri Carson, the University of Arizona clinical nursing instructor who developed a new child abuse screening program to help emergency room healthcare providers identify the signs of child abuse early on, visit here

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