New University of Arizona Program Aims to Diversify Arizona’s Nursing Workforce

New University of Arizona Program Aims to Diversify Arizona’s Nursing Workforce

The University of Arizona has launched a new program focused on diversifying Arizona’s nursing workforce. The new program, the Arizona Nursing Inclusive Excellence (ANIE) scholars project, is designed to improve diversity in Arizona’s nursing workforce to help better patients’ healthcare experiences.

Diversity is lacking in a variety of occupations across the country, especially healthcare. In Arizona, 61 percent of the nursing workforce in 2017 was made up of white nurses according to Arizona State University’s Center for Health Information and Research.

Studies show patients are more likely to trust their caretaker when they feel they understand them and where they come from. A more diverse nursing workforce can also reduce communication barriers that can lead to serious errors.

With $1.9 million in funding, the new program is designed to support students from underrepresented backgrounds, specifically Native American students, Hispanic students, students from rural areas, and first-generation college students. With the nation’s third largest population of Native Americans and a Hispanic population of nearly 31 percent, Arizona is well suited to implement the ANIE program.

In addition to academic support, the ANIE program is connecting students with mentors from similar backgrounds. Just like patients like to see themselves in their nurses, students like to see themselves reflected in their professors and advisers.

The ANIE program is projected to support 158 students over a span of four years, helping Arizona work toward a more diverse nursing workforce. To learn more about the program initiatives, visit here.

Arizona State University College of Nursing Hosts Guests from Vietnam Nursing School

Arizona State University College of Nursing Hosts Guests from Vietnam Nursing School

The Arizona State University (ASU) College of Nursing and Health Innovation recently welcomed international guests from the nursing department at University of Medicine and Pharmacy (UMP) in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, to learn about healthcare education in the US and ASU’s innovative teaching methods.

Visitors from UMP included the head of the nursing department and a few professors who spent a day touring ASU’s facilities, meeting faculty, and learning about their unique nursing program offerings. ASU Dean of Nursing Teri Pipe took the visiting group on a tour of the Downtown Phoenix campus, allowing them to explore their state-of-the-art simulation and learning resources lab, and observe students in their learning environment from a debrief room to watch their evidence-based curriculum in action.

Tran Thuy Khanh Linh, dean of the UMP nursing department, tells ASUNow.edu, “Vietnam is a developing country so we need to expand and improve a lot in nursing and we would like to see the health-care system in Vietnam evolve so that nursing is an important member in the health care systems. These observations and this trip is very helpful for us so that we can learn from ASU and we hope that we can implement part of it.”

The ASU College of Nursing faculty have been working with UMP nursing faculty in Ho Chi Minh City for almost 10 years, spending time on their campus in Vietnam to help their faculty grow and develop their program. Both schools are exploring new opportunities for developing a longer term relationship, feeling that both institutions have a lot to be learned from each other. UMP is particularly interested in learning how others are meeting the challenges of the quickly evolving healthcare industry.

To learn more about UMP’s visit to the ASU College of Nursing campus and how the two institutions are developing a mutually beneficial international relationship, visit here.

Arizona State University Names Judith Karshmer New Dean of College of Nursing and Health Innovation

Arizona State University Names Judith Karshmer New Dean of College of Nursing and Health Innovation

Arizona State University (ASU) recently named Judith Karshmer the new dean of the College of Nursing and Health Innovation. Karshmer is the former dean of the School of Nursing and Health Professions at the University of San Francisco (USF) and will join her new post at ASU in June.

Mark Searle, executive vice president and university provost, tells ASUNow.edu, “Judy’s commitment to seeking out innovative collaborations that address real-world concerns and develop new initiatives will position her well to lead our College of Nursing and Health Innovation. It’s exciting to have her join our knowledge enterprise.”

ASU has chosen Karshmer to focus on expanding the global footprint of the college through academic practice partnerships that promote research and community. She tells ASUNow.edu, “At USF I’ve been positioning the university to be the go-to place to advance health priorities in the city and the Bay Area. I want to bring that same kind of energy around promoting community and strategic partnership that embed practice, research and scholarship to ASU.”

Karshmer graduated from the University of Iowa with her bachelor’s degree in 1970 before continuing on to earn her master’s degree in advanced psychiatric nursing at Rutgers University. After being appointed to the San Francisco Health Commission in 2013, Karshmer became experienced in creating relationships within academia, overseeing the formation of partnerships with several nearby universities, as well as developing an integrated academic-practice model that allows faculty to provide services wile working with students at community clinics.

Karshmer is now expected to bring that expertise to ASU. To learn more about Judith Karshmer and her background in nursing education, visit here.

Arizona State University Offers Community-College Transfer Program to Reduce Tuition for Nursing Students

Arizona State University Offers Community-College Transfer Program to Reduce Tuition for Nursing Students

Arizona State University (ASU) has implemented a new strategy for tackling the challenge of getting more nurses to complete their bachelor’s degree. In Arizona, 28 percent of adults aged 25 and older hold a bachelor’s degree, compared with a nationwide percentage of 30 according to the US Census Bureau. Combined with the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation that 80 percent of registered nurses hold bachelor’s degrees by 2020, ASU wants to help more nurses receive their BSN.

The most popular way to pay a reduced tuition rate is by transferring from a community college. In 2016, ASU saw the number of transfer enrollments more than double compared to the prior decade. There was a 124 percent increase from 2007-08 to 2016-17 according to ASUNow.edu. Now ASU is working closely with community colleges to make transferring as simple as possible.

ASU has set up a transfer agreement with the local Maricopa community colleges called Maricopa-ASU Pathways Programs (MAPP). The program specifies which courses are needed for each major so students can avoid wasting time and money on classes that don’t apply to their degree choice. Students who meet the requirements of the transfer program are guaranteed admission to ASU and get help from ASU advisers while still in community college.

Dimi Wassef, an ASU community college transfer student, tells ASUNow.edu, “In our culture, there’s this idea that right after high school you have to go to a university and move away, but the community colleges offer a good transition and prepares you. It’s a more approachable setting than throwing yourself into a very complicated university setting, where you don’t use all the resources if you don’t know about them.”

There are several other ways that students can earn a four-year nursing degree from ASU including rural partnership programs and fast-track degree options. To learn more about ASU’s community college transfer program to reduce tuition for nursing students, visit here.

Arizona State University Nursing Professor Advocates for Human Trafficking Education

Arizona State University Nursing Professor Advocates for Human Trafficking Education

Samantha Calvin, Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation Assistant Professor, recently spoke at the 14th Annual Human Trafficking and Social Justice Conference held in Ohio. Calvin also teaches an innovate new course at ASU called “Fundamentals of Human Trafficking” which is one of the only courses on human trafficking available in a nursing school.

The conference is intended to bring together researchers, service providers, politicians, advocates, and students from across the globe to learn from each together and work toward finding real-world solutions to this problem. Calvin’s presentation focused on human trafficking in the clinic setting, red flags to look for, questions to ask, and what to do if someone is identified.

“What we’re finding is that health professionals do not feel comfortable identifying and treating someone who has been human trafficked.”

Calvin tells ASUNow.edu, “What we’re finding is that health professionals do not feel comfortable identifying and treating someone who has been human trafficked.” Her research is focused on female adolescent sex trafficking which she uses as course content for the human trafficking course she teaches in the nursing school.

Many schools of social work offer courses on human trafficking, but Calvin is advocating for the importance of knowing how to identify and treat human trafficking patients in a clinical setting. Calvin tells ASUNow.edu, “Even though a lot of these victims seek medical care they are not being identified and end up remaining in the cycle of human trafficking.”

Calvin hopes that sharing her research with other nursing schools across the country will help show the importance of her course at ASU and encourage other schools to add similar courses to their nursing curriculums.

To learn more about Calvin’s research and nursing course on human trafficking, visit here.

Northern Arizona University Introduces Personalized Learning Program to Help Nurses Earn BSN Degrees

Northern Arizona University Introduces Personalized Learning Program to Help Nurses Earn BSN Degrees

With a critical shortage of nurses predicted by 2025, a nationwide initiative began encouraging nurses with associate degrees to obtain their Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) by 2020. The shortage is expected to hit the state of Arizona particularly hard, which led Northern Arizona University (NAU) to find new ways to combat this issue. As a solution to the expected nursing shortage, NAU created a Personalized Learning program, an online competency-based program that allows students to work and progress at their own rate. The program is designed to fit into the schedules of working professionals, with a learning platform centered around real-world career knowledge to build on already mastered experiences.

Laura Blank, associate clinical professor and faculty mentor in the NAU School of Nursing, tells News.NAU.edu, “Arizona is predicted to take the biggest hit with 28,100 fewer nurses than necessary. One reason for this shortage is lack of nursing faculty.”

This degree became the perfect option for Danielle Cox, a charge nurse who already had 5 years of working experience in the field. Cox’s family attended NAU and she wanted to follow in their footsteps by going back to nursing school there but her 12-hour graveyard shifts in the ICU at Flagstaff Medical Center made it impossible for her to earn a BSN without quitting her full-time job.

She began looking for other ways to obtain her degree and found NAU’s Personalized Learning program. Cox explains how it became the perfect program her for: “I was able to work my stretch of night shifts and then dedicate my days off to school. Having no deadlines or due dates made going to school while working simple.” She also just became the first Personalized Learning student to graduate from the RN-to-BSN program this semester after completing the 33 credits she needed for her degree in less than six months. Now she plans to pursue her master’s degree in nursing and possibly start teaching.

Thanks to NAU’s Personalized Learning program, Arizona is now one step closer to combatting the shortage of nurses expected to soon hit the state. To learn more about the program, visit here.

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