AAMN Announces 2019 Best Schools for Men in Nursing Awards

AAMN Announces 2019 Best Schools for Men in Nursing Awards

Duke, Rutgers, University of Alabama-Birmingham, and nine other colleges and universities have been recognized as the “2019 Best Schools for Men in Nursing” by the American Association for Men in Nursing (AAMN).

Winning institutions are selected based on the significant efforts they have made to increase the number of male applicants, enrollees, admissions, and/or retentions in their programs, and have been shown to provide a supportive educational environment for male student nurses. All schools applying for the award are accredited by the National League of Nursing or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and have had a minimum NCLEX pass rate of 80% over the past three years.

2019 Best Schools for Men in Nursing

In alphabetical order, the winners are:

  • Duke University School of Nursing
  • John Hopkins University School of Nursing
  • Lewis University College of Nursing and Health Sciences
  • Nebraska Methodist College of Nursing
  • Northern Illinois University School of Nursing
  • NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing
  • Rutgers School of Nursing
  • University of Alabama-Birmingham School of Nursing
  • University of Cincinnati College of Nursing
  • University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh College of Nursing
    Vanderbilt University School of Nursing
  • West Coast University College of Nursing

2019 Best Workplaces for Men in Nursing:

  • New York Presbyterian Hospital
  • Vanderbilt University Medical Center

For a full list of 2019 AAMN awards, visit the AAMN awards page.

14 Nurses to Be Honored with Circle of Excellence Award at NTI 2019

14 Nurses to Be Honored with Circle of Excellence Award at NTI 2019

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) recently awarded 14 nurses from across the United States with the Circle of Excellence award. These nurses will be honored during AACN’s National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition (NTI) in Orlando, Florida, later this month.

NTI was founded in 1974 and is the largest educational conference and trade show for acute and critical care nurses. Bedside nurses, nurse educators, nurse managers, clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners are among NTI’s annual attendees.

The Circle of Excellence award candidates are evaluated on several factors, including their promotion of patient-driven excellence, communication skills, collaboration, effective decision making, and ability to address challenges and remove barriers to excellent patient care.

“These healthcare professionals exemplify why AACN is a community of exceptional nurses. Their efforts are transforming healthcare and shaping the future of nursing practice within their units, in the classroom, and throughout their organizations and their communities,” AACN President Lisa Riggs, MSN, APRN-BC, CCRN-K, shared with the AACN Newsroom. “Circle of Excellence recipients use their voice, skills and knowledge to ensure that every patient gets the excellent care they deserve and that every nurse has the tools and the skills they need to provide that care.”

The award supports the AACN’s mission to create healthcare systems designed around the needs of patients and their families, where acute and critical care nurses can help the most. The Circle of Excellence award also recognizes talents in shifting nursing profession trends and work environments, which helps AACN in their mission to design the best healthcare systems for patients and nurses. Awardees will receive a plaque and $1000 honorarium to attend NTI May 20-23. These rewards are supported by grants from Elsevier and Dale Medical.

The 2019 AACN Circle of Excellence award recipients are listed here. For more information about AACN, click here. For more information about NTI, click here.

Major Job Growth for NPs, PAs … in Prisons

Major Job Growth for NPs, PAs … in Prisons

Expect more non-physician professional hires in correctional institutions

When correctional nurse author and educator Lorry Schoenly, PhD, RN, was writing a book about nursing in prison, her publisher asked her who would buy the book. “We were trying to figure out how many correctional nurses there are,” said Schoenly who scoured state boards of nursing for the numbers of those specializing in corrections. But, unlike cardiology or obstetrics, correctional nursing was rarely listed as a specialty and Schoenly was unable to get a reliable count. “It’s an invisible field,” she said.

But even though centralized data on staffing trends in corrections healthcare is elusive, the demand for NPs and PAs is expected to grow. According to UConn Health, which currently staffs Connecticut’s correctional institutions with “half MDs and half midlevels,” increasingly more “midlevels” are being utilized. “Future job growth will most likely continue to rise as incarcerated populations rise and the age of the population rises,” a UConn Health representative told MedPage Today in an email.

Although rising rates of overall incarceration leveled off in 2006 and reversed a bit after 2015, life sentences have increased almost five-fold since 1984.

This increase in life sentences, along with longer sentences and more incarceration late in life, has contributed to a trend, often referred to as the greying of the inmates. “People are growing old in prison,” said Owen Murray, DO, MBA, vice president of offender health services at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston.

UConn Health noted that inmates 50 and older are the fastest growing demographic in federal prisons. With advancing age comes an increase in chronic disease, physical disability and cognitive decline. In Texas, there is pressure to either maintain current staffing or add more providers due to this shifting demographic. Spending per state is associated with, among other factors, the percentage of individuals 55 and older who are incarcerated, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts.

Greater use of NPs and PAs is one way prisons can provide legally required standards of care at lower cost. “The real impetus to use the lowest cost practitioner is not because there is less attention to quality, but to drive down healthcare costs,” said Kamala Mallik-Kane, MPH, a researcher at the Justice Policy Center at the Urban Institute.

Murray has noticed a rising presence of NPs and PAs over the past three decades. “Certainly as it relates to both jail and prison medicine, there has been a significant increase not just within the state of Texas but pretty much every other state that I’m familiar with in terms of the growth opportunities for midlevel providers.”

According to the American Academy of Physician Assistants, the absolute number of PAs working in prisons increased from 1995 to 2015. For NPs, a survey conducted by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners demonstrated that since 1999 the estimated NP population working in corrections has grown from 550, or 0.8%, of total NPs in 1999, to 2,400, or 1.1%, in 2016. (more…)

Is Your Workplace in Good Shape?

Is Your Workplace in Good Shape?

This online tool for nurses can assess the health of a range of work environments

What makes a work environment healthy? According to the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), it’s a place where healthcare professionals can make their optimal contribution. For almost a decade, critical care nurses have been able to evaluate the health of their work environment with the association’s online assessment tool based on its Healthy Work Environment standards.

Now a new study finds that the tool has applications beyond critical care, and is effective for assessing the health of the work environment for interprofessional patient care teams throughout a hospital’s patient care settings.

“Although AACN’s assessment tool has been used primarily among acute and critical care nurses, our findings support consideration of wider use in multiple healthcare settings,” said the study’s principal investigator, Jean Anne Connor, PhD, RN, CPNP, director of nursing research, cardiovascular, and critical care patient services at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Clinical leaders understand that to safeguard the quality of patient care, attention must be focused on the performance of healthcare teams.”

The Interprofessional Team

The assessment tool is an 18-question survey designed to help organizations or departments identify areas for improvement. It assists in measuring the health of a work environment against AACN’s six Healthy Work Environment standards:

  • Skilled communication
  • True collaboration
  • Effective decision-making
  • Appropriate staffing
  • Meaningful recognition
  • Authentic leadership

The study, published in the American Journal of Critical Care, reports the results of a two-phase administration of the tool to 2,621 patient-care employees at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Researchers administered the survey using a test-retest, two-stage approach. First, the AACN Healthy Work Environment Assessment Tool was administered to all healthcare team members, including physicians, nurses, social workers, therapists, clinical assistants, and administrators.

The first wave of the survey received 1,030 responses from 2,621 potential employee participants. Three weeks later, a second survey was sent to a random sample of 200 potential respondents stratified by role (physician, nurse, and others), and the response rate was 83.5%. The results of the responses showed that the AACN Healthy Work Environments Assessment Tools is reliable and valid, supporting its use as an organizational measure, the researchers concluded.

Expanded Use

They noted that Boston Children’s Hospital has used the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture since 2010 to assess how employees perceive their work environment regarding patient safety. The hospital has also administered the AACN online assessment tool to interprofessional staff in critical care and cardiovascular programs annually since 2010 and recently expanded it to an enterprise-wide assessment.

The team said that study results have been used in the development of measurement benchmarks and led to use of the Healthy Work Environments Assessment Tool in a nurse-led consortium of 30 cardiovascular programs in freestanding children’s hospitals.

This story was originally posted on MedPage Today.

Research of the Week: Resisting the Slow Undoing of Human Rights

Research of the Week: Resisting the Slow Undoing of Human Rights

This week we’re featuring Resisting the Slow Undoing of Human Rights, a Nursing Knowledge Activities column from the journal Research and Theory for Nursing Practice. Author Debra R. Hanna, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, provided some insight as to how she prepared this column to write about the Transcultural Nursing Society. Read more below:

The column about Nursing Knowledge Activities, is intended to inform readers about events and developments in nursing knowledge. Having had a long-term interest in theory and research I wrote a series of columns to showcase different professional organizations dedicated to nursing theory activities.

 

Usually I write the Nursing Knowledge Activities column about 4-6 months before it  appears in print. In October 2017 I began writing the May 2018 column. Having already written about several nursing theory organizations, I  wanted to write about the Transcultural Nursing Society started by Madeleine Leininger. That Fall, I was doing background reading about twentieth century American history for a book I am currently writing. Each evening, the national news mentioned Congress wanting to overturn the Affordable Care Act. Also, there were news stories about refugees fleeing crisis situations from several parts of the world. Our politicians seemed divided about wanting to help refugees. That news broke my heart since it seemed that some politicians were not interested in helping humanity.

 

My first column for May 2018 was focused on a different topic. But then things came together on December 12, 2017. I decided to write a completely different column for May 2018. That morning I had read President Kennedy’s speech during my background reading. It reminded me of Leininger’s approach to human beings that was so nurturing, caring, and respectful of human dignity. The stark contrast between Kennedy’s approach to humanity and current political conversations, created a clear insight. I then examined the Transcultural Nursing Society’s website equipped with that insight. Once I saw the rich treasures that the Transcultural Nursing Society has to offer nurses today, I scrapped my other column. Within a half hour I wrote May’s column from beginning to end.

You can ready Dr. Hanna’s column, Resisting the Slow Undoing of Human Rights, here. To subscribe to Research and Theory for Nursing Practice, click here.

Johnson & Johnson “Nurses Innovate Quickfire Challenge” Now Open for Submissions

Johnson & Johnson “Nurses Innovate Quickfire Challenge” Now Open for Submissions

Earlier this week, Johnson & Johnson started a challenge for all U.S. nurses to participate in and contribute. The “Nurses Innovate QuickFire Challenge” is designed for nurses to submit ideas for new devices, health technologies, protocols and/or treatment approaches. Participants can receive up to $100,000 in grants from this challenge, and also receive mentoring and coaching access through Johnson & Johnson Innovation, JLABS.

(PRNewsfoto/Johnson & Johnson)

Innovation in patient care has a long and linear history with nursing, from figures like Florence Nightingale, Nurse Jean Ward, and Nurse Rebecca Koszalinkski. The combination of nurses’ patient experience and insight and resourcefulness provides them with a unique perspective in the healthcare field, allowing them to have significant and crucial input in addressing health challenges.

Yet a nationwide survey showed Johnson & Johnson that nearly half of Americans (41%) are unaware of the role that nurses play in developing new medical tools and solutions. However, the majority (66%) believe that all medical professionals are capable of coming up with lifesaving ideas, and 75% of those surveyed believe nurses should have platform to submit ideas and inventions for improving patient care.

Investing in nurses is part of Johnson & Johnson’s storied history, as the company has provided funding for scholarships, employment opportunities, and more since their start in 1897. Previous efforts to help nurses include the “Campaign for Nursing’s Future,” which took care of a nursing shortage and increased the nursing workforce by more than one million.

The challenge is open now through February 1, 2019. Applicants should meet the following criteria:

  • Uniqueness of the idea
  • Potential impact on human health
  • Feasibility of the idea
  • Thoroughness of approach
  • Identification of key resources and plan to further idea

For more information about the Johnson & Johnson Nurses Innovate QuickFire Challenge, visit nursing.jnj.com/home.

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