Iona College to Launch New BSN Program this Fall

Iona College to Launch New BSN Program this Fall

To help meet the growing demand for RNs, Iona College in New York is about to join the ranks of schools offering a BSN program. This fall, Iona will provide students with two routes to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree: one option is to embark on a traditional 4-year undergraduate program with a core liberal arts curriculum, while students who already have a bachelor’s degree in another field will be able to take an accelerated, 15-month second-degree program.

In announcing the launch of the new program, Iona College president Seamus Carey remarked, “As we have seen throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, nurses truly are heroes – and the world needs more of them. In keeping with the mission and values of an Iona education, the nursing curriculum will prepare nurses who can both initiate and adapt to change, serve patients with compassion while demonstrating critical thinking in health care innovation, engage in bold leadership and advocacy, and seek knowledge wherever it presents itself in pursuit of a global culture of health.”

Darrell P. Wheeler, Iona’s provost and senior vice president for Academic Affairs added, “Iona College is committed to and well positioned to offer a cutting-edge, interdisciplinary nursing program that will prepare students to meet the challenges of health care delivery and leadership in today’s and tomorrow’s complex health care system. Being in New Rochelle, just five miles outside of New York City in Westchester County, our students will have hands-on experience in some of the nation’s top facilities. We cannot wait to welcome our first class of exceptional students this fall.”

Located some 20 miles north of Midtown Manhattan, Iona College is a Catholic, coeducational institution with a total enrollment of about 4,000 students. The new BSN program, under the direction of Susan Apold, Ph.D., RN, ANP-BC, GNP, FAAN, FAANP, is designed to take advantage of the school’s proximity to New York City and will provide students with clinical opportunities at leading hospitals in the Metropolitan area. For full details on the new program, visit the Iona College BSN page.

GWU Receives 2.5 Million for Veterans’ BSN Aid Program

GWU Receives 2.5 Million for Veterans’ BSN Aid Program

The George Washington University School of Nursing has just received the largest philanthropic gift in the school’s history. Through the William and Joanne Conway Transitioning Warriors Nursing Scholars Initiative, $2.5 million in financial aid is being made available to help eligible military veterans working toward a BSN degree. The gift is expected to support more than 65 students over the next five years.

Donors William Conway, co-founder of The Carlyle Group, and his wife Joanne are long-time supporters of nursing education. School of Nursing Dean Pamela Jeffries commented, “The Conways’ commitment to our military veterans is unwavering, and so is ours at the GW School of Nursing. As we celebrate our 10th anniversary, it’s gifts like these that enable us to grow our veteran student population and provide the resources they need to succeed.”

The aid program will be welcomed by veterans. Despite the assistance available through military benefits such as the GI Bill, many vets still find it a challenge to support themselves and their families when they re-enter the civilian world and attempt to pursue a degree. The Conways are happy to offer a helping hand. “The Transitioning Warriors Nursing Scholars Initiative is designed to reward the brave men and women of our armed forces who seek to continue their service to our country as civilian nurses,” Mr. Conway stated. GWU President Thomas LeBlanc responded, “We are grateful to the Conways for enabling this investment when our nation’s nursing workforce and veterans need it most.”

Founded 10 years ago, the George Washington University School of Nursing is currently the sixth ranked school in the US News and World Report assessment of online graduate nursing programs. The gift was presented in May, while the school was celebrating its 10th anniversary.

For further details on this story, visit GWToday at the University website.

Salish Kootenai First Tribal College to Offer BSN Degree

Salish Kootenai First Tribal College to Offer BSN Degree

Prompted by the World Health Organization initiative to have 80% of nurses possess a bachelor’s degree by 2020, in fall 2020, Salish Kootenai College will become the first tribal college to offer a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). Located in Montana, Salish Kootenai College serves the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation, a federally recognized tribe.

A major consideration in making this transition, according to nursing program director Lisa Harmon, is that a BSN is swiftly becoming an entry-level requirement for nurses. Harmon notes that a BSN will also open up more opportunities for graduating students, as both privately owned facilities as well as federal agencies such as the Indian Health Services (IHS) require a bachelor’s degree from all nursing applicants. For graduates of the Salish Kootenai program, which is designed to prepare Native American nurses for professional practice and leadership in rural and tribal communities, the prospect of working for the IHS is a particularly strong consideration as students often choose to work within their home reservation, where IHS is a significant source of nursing opportunities.

Harmon says, “We want to be doing the right thing for our Native American graduate nurses and have them be able to work in these IHS facilities. Or wherever anybody wants to go, it just gives so much more employment opportunity.”

While the college offers an “RN to BSN” option, Harmon notes that many federal programs will only subsidize a first degree, and adds, “As the student loan crisis ramps up, which yes the United States has a student loan crisis, there’s just more restrictions. And (the RN to BSN program) just wasn’t doing our students any good. So then they couldn’t finish their bachelor’s because they didn’t qualify anymore for student loans. Now we are offering this four-year degree which will be better all around, for financial aid and scholarships.”

Of the new BSN program, which is two years in the making, Harmon remarks, “We are just excited that we are offering what students need,” Harmon said. “We’ll be the first tribal college in the United States to offer this four-year BSN. I feel really good about it. I feel like it’s the right thing to do.”

For more details on the Salish Kootenai College BSN, program, visit here.

Golden Careers: Gerontology in Action

Golden Careers: Gerontology in Action

Only one group of Americans has more than doubled in size over the past twenty years: the elderly. They’ve experienced more than most in their lifetimes, from world wars to the first man on the moon. Thanks to lengthening life spans, they have much more to experience; over 41.4 million Americans are 65 and older – that’s more than 13.3 percent of the total U.S. population.1

As this golden group ages, how can we serve and love the elders that hold such a special place in our communities and families?

GERONTOLOGY CAREERS

Case worker

The role of geriatric social workers includes:

  • Helping senior citizens cope with common problems experienced by the elderly
  • Ensuring the needs of their clients are met from day-to-day
  • Providing aid with financial issues, medical care, mental disorders and social problems

Geriatric care manager

Care managers help the elderly and their loved ones develop a long-term care plan and connect with necessary services.

Healthcare business manager

These managers make sure healthcare facilities provide the most effective patient care. This includes planning and coordinating services in hospitals and clinics.

Art therapist

Art therapy uses the visual and auditory arts to help restore function and general wellbeing. Benefits can include:

  • Increased cognitive skills
  • Intellectual stimulation
  • Improved motor skills
  • Alleviated pain
  • Socialization
  • Self-expression

78 percent of art therapists report working with older adults on a regular basis.2

Grief counselor

Grief counselors help seniors process bereavement and loss, as well as cope with thoughts of their own death.

Assisted living administrator

Administrators manage assisted living facilities or services, which provide care to adults who need help with daily tasks like bathing, eating and dressing.

Health educator

These educators provide the elderly with lessons that inform them about health concerns.

Physical therapist

Physical therapists help aging adults strengthen their muscles, increase mobility and improve endurance. They also help with recovery from an injury or illness.

HELPING AND HEALING

The elderly are likely to face hardships, but with our help, they don’t have to go through them alone.

Bereavement and loss

A natural part of the aging process is experiencing the loss of loved ones as well as coping with one’s own progressing age. Seniors often experience bereavement and loss differently than younger adults, which puts them at risk for depression, anxiety and PTSD. Grieving seniors can benefit from the support others as they work through difficult times.

75 percent of adults 50 and older reported finding humor and laughter in their daily lives.3

Family caregiving

Family caregivers play a crucial role in keeping the elderly comfortable at home by providing support like:

  • Economic resources
  • Loving relationships and companionship
  • Minimal health and wellness assistance
  • Support with day-to-day needs

More than 10 percent of the U.S. population have served as unpaid caregivers for older adults.4

Health promotion and self-care

Age can prevent seniors from properly taking care of their bodies, but we can help our loved ones stay beautiful and healthy. Helping the elderly groom themselves, receive regular medical attention and stay active can go a long way in promoting general wellbeing.

Disabilities

In more extreme cases, seniors may experience disabilities or other chronic health conditions. You can support older adults by ensuring they can access the healthcare professionals and resources they need. This might involve assistance with transportation and attending to business, legal and medical concerns.

75 percent of seniors have at least one chronic health condition, and most have two or more.5

End-of-life and palliative care

As our loved ones enter their final days, specialized care can help provide relief from the symptoms and stress. End-of-life and palliative care makes their last days as pain-free and comfortable as possible.

Quality of long-term care

Fortunately, there are a number of geriatric professionals trained to provide excellent care for aging adults in all of these areas. A growing population of the elderly means the demand for these practitioners is greater than ever – and there are more opportunities for you to bring wellness and care into the lives of the elderly than ever.

Interested in a career in a gerontology? Pursuing an online master’s degree can help. Learn more at: https://www.cune.edu/academics/graduate/master-healthcare-administration/gerontology/

SOURCES

  1. https://www.upi.com/133-percent-in-US-are-seniors/75971362689252/
  2. American Art Therapy Association
  3. https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/basics/info-2017/truth-about-grief.html
  4. https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/geriatrics/social-issues-in-the-elderly/family-caregiving-for-the-elderly
  5. National Council on Aging

This sponsored story is brought to you by Concordia University Nebraska.

New Dual Admission Partnership Between UMSON and CCBC

New Dual Admission Partnership Between UMSON and CCBC

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) and the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) recently joined forces to offer a new dual admission BSN program. CCBC is the thirteenth school to create a dual-admission partnership agreement with the school.

Dual-admission partnerships are growing in popularity nationally, as more people are seeking out RN-to-BSN opportunities. These kinds of programs benefit not only the program participants, but the schools and healthcare employers as well. As the nursing shortage continues through the United States, hospitals and health organizations are constantly looking for ways to meet staffing needs.

This is one of several RN-to-BSN partnerships that CCBC has with various universities across Maryland, but the requirements at UMSON are different. “The UMSON partnership is unique, as the dual admission pathway provides flexibility and choice to CCBC students,” Linda Murray, DNP, CPNP-Ped, assistant professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, shared. “The UMSON CCBC partnership does not require students to take BSN courses while still in the ADN program, but affords them the flexibility to take courses if they wish.”

Additional requirements include admission into CCBC’s ADN program, and completion of the first semester of the nursing program at CCBC. But while CCBC has several campuses, this program opportunity is only available to students at the Catonsville and Essex locations.

Since fall 2016, UMSON has admitted 139 dual admission students. These dual admission programs allow students to balance their coursework and work and home responsibilities, giving students the option to continue working, instead of solely focusing on their academics.

Beyond saving time in this RN-to-BSN program, students will also save money. “UMSON is currently covering the cost of its BSN courses for students participating in the dual-admission partnership while they are still enrolled in the ADN program, an opportunity made possible with funds from a gift from Bill and Joanne Conway through their Bedford Falls Foundation,” Murray said. “Once the student graduates from their ADN program and matriculates into UMSON, they can apply for a full Conway Scholarship, which covers the costs of in-state tuition, fees, and books for the duration of the program.”

For more information about the UMSON-CCBC dual admission program, click here.

Beyond the Hospital: 8 Non-Bedside Nursing Jobs

Beyond the Hospital: 8 Non-Bedside Nursing Jobs

The word “nurse” brings a very specific picture to mind for most of us. We picture someone in scrubs working in a hospital or a clinic, helping to treat patients at the bedside and making rounds. But the skill set developed through nursing opens up entire worlds beyond that traditional environment. Nursing jobs away from the bedside are challenging, rewarding and not at all what you’d expect. 

In this article, we’ll go over some non-bedside nursing jobs and what they entail. We’ll talk about the duties of those nurses, the environments in which they work, and in some cases, what they can expect to earn. If you’re looking to move your career into a more interesting phase, you might consider pursuing a non-traditional nursing career. 

8 Non-bedside Nursing Jobs

From summer camp programs to the NASCAR racetrack, some surprising places need medical professionals on hand. These career options could offer more work-life stability, travel opportunities or a shot of adrenaline. 

1. Cruise Ship Nurse

A nurse working in this role would help care for a cruise ship’s passengers and staff as part of the ship’s medical personnel. Depending on the size of the ship, the medical facilities could be quite state-of-the-art, rivaling an emergency room in a hospital on land. Cruise ship nurses work in the infirmary and report to the chief nurse. Working in this role requires at least two years of emergency care experience and an advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) certification. Working on a cruise ship brings these nurses into contact with people from all over the world, and of course, offers the opportunity to travel. Nursing staff on a cruise ship are divided into three distinct categories: chief nurse, nurse practitioner and staff nurse. Duties here are much the same as nursing on land, but a cruise ship nurse could accompany a patient if they must be evacuated from the ship to land. Tours of duty are six months long, with two months off afterward.

2. Camp Nurse

If you’re someone who prefers the outdoors and doesn’t like to stay in one place for very long, camp nursing could be for you. There are myriad camp organizations that employ camp nurses. There are camps for children diagnosed with cancer, adults with mental disabilities or camps that center around an activity like whitewater rafting or horseback riding. The Association of Camp Nurses (ACN) lists opportunities on their website, so you can browse through them and see which one most closely fits your background. Those with experience in emergency care or pediatrics would be well-suited, and an ability to make decisions independently is key, as camp nurses often work alone. According to PayScale, camp nurses can expect to earn between $22-$41 per hour. 

3. Correctional Nurse/Prison Nurse 

A nurse working in this role will often be the first person to see an inmate about a health complaint. A correctional nurse will assess the patient and determine the requirements of care the same as they would if they were working in a hospital. They conduct intake screenings, work in chronic care clinics to help inmates manage chronic conditions, keep track of medications so they aren’t misused and provide what’s known as “sick call” services. Sick call is when an inmate requests to see a nurse for a sudden issue, which can result in an appointment with a physician. This role could also offer the opportunity to become a coordinator for programs like prison hospice care, in which inmates are trained to take care of their peers during the final phase of their lives in incarceration.

4. Clinical Nurse Educator/RN Medical Device Educator 

This may be one of the more well-known non-bedside nursing careers, in which an experienced nursing professional opts to instruct others in the practices and techniques of the job. Nurse educators can work in a classroom setting in a university or nursing school, as well as in the field with nurses-in-training or with those who need a clinical education, such as people who work in insurance or public healthcare workers. Because being employed in this role often requires a bachelor’s or other advanced degree, nurse educators can train medical staff to instruct non-medical personnel in medical procedures and equipment. A very high satisfaction rate is reported with this job, and the median salary is just over $75,000 per year, according to PayScale. 

5. Nurse Writer/Medical Writer

A background in or passion for writing as well as experience in healthcare can be leveraged into a career as a nurse writer. Their job is to write up training materials, manuals and educational papers for their employers. Nurse writers usually work for a healthcare provider, pharmaceutical company, medical equipment company or something in a similar vein. They must be able to research well, express specialized information in a readable manner and conduct interviews, similar to the duties of a journalist. PayScale reported that job satisfaction rates for this role are also high, and the median salary is similar to that of a nurse educator at just over $70,000 per year.

6. NASCAR Nurse

NASCAR drivers are just as much athletes as players in the NBA or NFL are, and the sport is one of the most popular in North America. When a driver has a crash, medical staff need to be on site to help. NASCAR nurses do initial assessments of the pit crew and drivers after an accident occurs, but a large part of their work is looking after the fans. This role can involve travel as well, if you’re working as an official part of the NASCAR team and following the races as they move across the country. NASCAR nurses also act as liaisons between the team and local medical staff working an event, making sure the proper equipment is on hand to handle anything from dehydration to lacerations and blunt force trauma. 

7. Flight Nurse

Perhaps the most action-packed on this list of non-bedside nursing jobs, a flight nurse isn’t what you might think when reading the job title. Rather than working on an aircraft, flight nurse travel to remote locations not easily accessible to help the injured. They provide specialized, hospital-level care to their patients as they’re being airlifted to a medical facility. This can be at the scene of a major accident, between hospitals or in a remote wilderness location. Flight nurse Matt Tederman, in an interview with PBS, detailed the time he had to help a snowmobiler in the rural plains of Omaha with a neck laceration from barbed wire. Helping to bring that patient back, he says, was a reminder of why he does the job. This position requires a BSN and three to five years of experience working in the ER or intensive care unit (ICU).

8. Parish Nurse

Last on our list of non-bedside nursing jobs is the parish nurse. Parish nurses care for the members of a parish or religious congregation. They approach their work differently than the other people on this list as they integrate elements of faith into their work alongside medicine. Relatively new as nursing specialties go, it was only recognized as such in 1998. Parish nurses work mostly in churches, but you can also find them in hospitals or social service agencies, as many hospitals have chapel areas set aside for people to worship. If a hospital is faith-based, it’s more likely to employ parish nurses. The duties of a parish nurse include visiting patients, mentoring members of their religious community, acting as a patient advocate and starting support groups. Parish nurses are required to hold active RN licenses and have practiced as an RN for two years or more.

Want to Take the Next Step? 

If getting outside of the hospital sounds like the next step in your career, Fairleigh Dickinson University can help you get there. Our accredited RN to BSN online program trains working nurses to deliver comprehensive care to individuals and families in all environments so that you’ll have the skills necessary to become competitive in the job market. If you already have your BSN and are looking to advance your knowledge and care practices, consider our MSN nurse educator online program. We’ll prepare you to become an instructor in collegiate nursing programs. Through a state-of-the-art curriculum, you’ll acquire the training you need to effectively work with students, parents and patients.

This sponsored post is brought to you by Fairleigh Dickinson University.

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