UMass Dartmouth Doctoral Nursing Student Receives Jonas Philanthropies Grant

UMass Dartmouth Doctoral Nursing Student Receives Jonas Philanthropies Grant

A University of Massachusetts Dartmouth student was recently awarded a $10,000 grant from Jonas Philanthropies. Christine Fournier Bell, a second-year nursing Ph.D student, received the Jonas Nurse Scholar grant for studying the effects of combined educational and behavioral intervention on pain management practices.

“Christine was chosen for this honor based on her scholarly record and her commitment to improving the care of persons with substance use disorders through nursing intervention in the acute care setting,” said UMass Dartmouth College of Nursing Dean Kimberly Christopher. “We are very proud of Christine Bell and of our Ph.D. program. This is a wonderful testament to our program.”

Bell is the second Jonas Scholar from UMass Dartmouth. In addition to receiving the grant, she will participate in the Jonas Nurse Leaders Program in Washington DC.

“I am humbled and grateful for such an honor,” Bell shared with the UMass Dartmouth Office of Public Affairs. “As a nurse who cares deeply for this population, I look forward to working alongside nurses to find new ways to provide innovative care and treatment to people living with the disease of substance use disorder. There is always hope.”

Launched in 2008, the Jonas Nurse Scholars program has awarded more than 1,000 scholars across the US. The invitation-only program supports development of doctoral nursing students to address the nationwide nursing faculty shortage.

For more information about the Jonas Scholars and Jonas Philanthropies, click here. For more information about the UMass Dartmouth College of Nursing, click here.

Arizona State University Introduces Pediatric Nursing Program to Meet Community Needs

Arizona State University Introduces Pediatric Nursing Program to Meet Community Needs

The Arizona State University (ASU) College of Nursing and Health Innovation has announced that it will be offering a new advanced practice nursing degree this coming fall with a focus on acute care for children. The Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner speciality program is an addition to ASU’s Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program which aims to meet the needs of students and community partners.

Daniel Crawford, associate director of the DNP program and clinical assistant professor, believes the pediatric nursing program will prepare advanced practice nurses in the acute-care setting. He tells ASUNow.ASU.edu, “Those settings may include pediatric emergency rooms, pediatric intensive-care units, pediatric inpatient-care units and some pediatric specialties.”

Students who join the program can expect a hybrid format that requires in-person classes and online classes. The courses will focus on the development of a framework for developmentally supportive, family-centered, culturally appropriate advanced-practice nursing for infants and children with unstable chronic, complex acute, and life-threatening illnesses.

ASU’s Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner program is one of few in the country and will help prepare advanced practice nurses to treat a vulnerable population in need of specialized care. To learn more about ASU’s new pediatric nursing program, visit here.

Nurses of the Week: Advanced Practice Nurses Ana Verzone and Jackie Baer Work to Combat Rural Health Care Crisis

Nurses of the Week: Advanced Practice Nurses Ana Verzone and Jackie Baer Work to Combat Rural Health Care Crisis

In honor of National Nurses Week (May 6-12, 2018), our Nurses of the Week are Ana Verzone and Jackie Baer, two nurse practitioners who have dedicated their careers to caring for the neglected and underserved populations in America’s rural regions.

According to The National Rural Health Association (NRHA), the US is facing a major rural health care crisis, with nearly one third of the country’s rural hospitals having closed or at serious risk of closure. This leaves rural populations at risk, often putting the lives of the poor, elderly, and chronically ill in jeopardy.

Both Verzone and Baer credit Jonas Philanthropies – an organization devoted to improving our nation’s healthcare through advancing the nursing profession – for the work they do today. As graduates of the Jonas Scholar program, they were awarded scholarships to achieve their Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees. Over 1,000 nurses across all 50 states have received funding support from the Jonas Scholar program to further their doctoral education.

To shed light on the current rural health care crisis, we interviewed Verzone and Baer on their thoughts on the issue, and how they are both personally working to provide care to those most in need.

Q+A with Ana Verzone, FNP, CNM, and Jonas Scholar

Ana Verzone is a nursing educator and practitioner who has brought care to the most remote communities across the globe, from Alaskan villages to Nepal, where she conducted her doctoral research on improving communication between rural clinics and emergency rooms. Verzone now teaches future generations of nurses at Frontier Nursing University and the University of Alaska, helping to address the nationwide shortage of nursing faculty and rural primary care providers.

  1. Tell us about your background in nursing.

I love to travel, and before I became a nurse, I was a professional mountaineering guide in Nepal, amongst other places. While passing through a rural village I met two nurse practitioners conducting research on the impact of high altitude on health – they were incredibly inspiring. Knowing I wanted to serve others, I decided to follow their paths and become a nurse. I earned a Master’s in Nursing from the University of California, San Francisco and then worked at San Francisco General Hospital in the emergency department.

I knew continuing my education would empower me to help underserved communities, as well as eventually teach. Thanks to Jonas Philanthropies, an organization that supports doctoral nursing students through its Jonas Scholar program, I was able to pursue my doctorate as a way to give back to the profession I became so passionate about, and to address the shortage of nursing faculty in America. With support from this scholarship, I was able to improve care in remote regions of Nepal, continue my work in remote Alaskan villages, and teach the next generation of future nurses.

Today I work as adjunct faculty at Frontier Nursing University, where I received my Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. I have also taught in the University of Alaska’s nursing program.

  1. How did you develop a passion for rural health care?

My mother was a first-generation immigrant, and my father was second-generation. I grew up in a poor environment that exposed me to the great need in underserved communities and inspired me to find ways that I could help improve nursing care in these areas with a sustainable impact. I have worked in private settings, but my heart was always in providing primary care to the less fortunate, because otherwise these communities would have no other options. Rural areas remain the most at risk; they continue to be neglected and there’s still much work to be done.

  1. How are you personally working to combat the rural health care crisis?

I am currently a member of the National Quality Forum’s (NQF) Measure Applications Partnership (MAP) Rural Healthcare Workgroup. This is a multi-stakeholder group that aims to identify appropriate quality measures and measurement gaps relevant to vulnerable individuals in rural areas, and provide recommendations regarding the alignment and coordination efforts of measurement in the rural population. This Workgroup will ensure the perspectives of rural residents and providers—those who are most affected and most knowledgeable about rural measurement challenges and solutions—have adequate representation on MAP.This group will provide recommendations to the federal government for Medicare/CMS’s measurement standards.

Of note: NQF is the only consensus-based healthcare organization in the nation as defined by the Office of Management and Budget. This status allows the federal government to rely on NQF-defined measures or healthcare practices as the best, evidence-based approaches to improving care. The federal government, states, and private sector organizations use NQF’s endorsed measures, which must meet rigorous criteria, to evaluate performance and share information with patients and their families.

My doctoral project focused on improving emergency transports from rural outreach clinics to large referral hospitals in Nepal and was very successful. The protocols I initiated during my project are continuing even though my project itself is complete. I remain committed to rural Alaskans, and continue to serve this population. I also make sure to volunteer in rural areas internationally, so I can keep my finger on the pulse of these issues on a global level. I travel with my family when I do this, since it’s important to me that my daughter also grows up exposed to these issues. My husband is a physician assistant, so he can also actively participate in these trips on the healthcare side as well.

I also hope to improve the quality of healthcare delivered in rural areas by committing to train the next generation of advanced-practice nurses to excel in rural settings. This is important to me especially as a Jonas Scholar, as Jonas Philanthropies empowers nurses to take leadership and faculty roles, to ultimately advance the nursing profession and improve care for our nation’s most vulnerable citizens. Frontier Nursing University, where I currently work, is committed to training advanced-practice nurses that want to serve rural populations, and my work at the University of Alaska supported training students in the specific needs of rural Alaskan regions. Rural areas often require a practitioner to have a wider breadth of skills (primary care practitioners in particular) and have fewer resources available. There are challenges such as geographic isolation or small practice size, limited time, staff, and infrastructure for internal quality improvement efforts. Advanced-practice nurses are a critical part of the solution for these issues.

Q+A with Jackie Baer, APRN, DNP, FNP-BC, and Jonas Scholar

Jackie Baer is a nurse practitioner who runs a free clinic in rural South Carolina, serving 3,000 uninsured patients per year. After witnessing the similarities in healthcare conditions for the poor in rural South Carolina compared to mission camps she served in Venezuela, Baer decided to leave her work in the privatized healthcare sector to serve the rural communities who need it most.

  1. Tell us about your background in nursing.

I began my nursing career in 1993, and after earning my Nurse Practitioner degree in 1998, I was still called to continue my higher education in nursing. With help from Jonas Philanthropies’ Jonas Scholar program, an organization that seeks to advance the nursing profession through the higher education of leaders in the field, I earned my Doctorate in Nursing Practice (DNP) degree at the University of South Carolina. The Jonas Scholar program took a big financial burden off my doctorate education, allowing me to grow as a nurse and connect with a network of nurse leaders that I wouldn’t have had otherwise.

Throughout my career, I’ve worked in many different arenas: ER, research nurse, home-health, rehab, and even a city jail. The different settings have helped me develop a passion for primary care and preventative medicine. In 2003 I started the first rural health clinic in Johns Island, South Carolina—a very destitute and underserved community. My clinic provides primary care to many in my community, keeping open late into the evening and providing weekend hours to accommodate the working poor.

  1. How did you develop a passion for rural health care?

In early 2000 I was a single mother and still relatively early in my nursing career. I took a mission trip to Venezuela and was so inspired by the patients who could maintain health and happiness even with a few resources. When I returned to the US, I stumbled upon Johns Island by accident; I got lost while traveling the Sea Islands of South Carolina and came upon the island and its federally qualified healthcare clinic serving the poor. I stopped by to ask for directions, but as fate would have it, I was inspired by the clinic’s work with the local community and began working there shortly after.When I moved to Johns Island and eventually opened the first rural health clinic in the county, I immediately recognized there were similarities to Venezuelan migrant camps and rural communities in South Carolina. Having spent part of my career working in private care, it was heartbreaking to see a great disconnect between how private patients and patients in poor, rural communities are treated. I believe each patient should be given the same care, which is what drives me to continue my work at my clinic today.

Being a nurse in rural healthcare is so much more than providing care—it’s about being an advocate for my patients. I’m helping people who are in great need, and recognizing not everyone has a roof over their heads. That’s why I chose to be a nurse, not a doctor. It’s not just about writing a prescription or providing an operation, it’s more about listening and providing care. Nurses are taught to care for the heart, mind, and the soul. I try to write few prescriptions and instead focus on life skills versus pills. Looking back, I feel that I have not only impacted my patients but improved the health care of families with early diagnosis and intervention. My doctorate thesis was on weight loss in obese African American women and it continues to be a great success for the community I serve.

  1. How are you personally working to combat the rural health care crisis?

At my clinic, we see around 3,000 patients a year who would otherwise not have primary care options. I feel a very strong connection to my community and am happy to provide a service to the poor. I am blessed to have a 73-year-old supervising physician at the clinic. But if she leaves or heaven forbid something happens to her, my clinic closes! In fact, one physician wanted to charge me $1,000 per month to supervise me in giving medically assisted treatment to patients. The red-tape and financial burden of these agreements continue to overwhelm me.

Health policy change is critical. In South Carolina, I continue to struggle with “agreements” due to outdated laws. Winston Churchill said, “History has a lot to teach and we are doomed if we fail to learn from it.” The National Council of the State Board of Nursing conducted a study in 2018 and found that states with “full practice” authority—the ability for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) to work to the full extent of their education—have better outcomes, save taxpayers money, and provide increased care access to rural communities. As doctors continue to leave our rural communities, the opportunity for APRNs is great, but the obstacles in the scope of practice limit success. As a nurse practitioner in rural South Carolina, I work day-by-day under these “agreements,” but could literally be gone tomorrow. Sadly, the injustice in healthcare continues for those that are poor and underserved.

As a highly trusted profession, nursing needs a mammoth legal presence in the state legislature to make sure laws are simple and clear. With fifty years of conclusive data, nursing will win but only if we have a team of lawyers advocating on our behalf. I believe that if “full practice” has improved outcomes for our Veterans, why not for rural America?

UCLA Nursing Introduces Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree Program

UCLA Nursing Introduces Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree Program

In response to an evolving healthcare landscape, the UCLA School of Nursing has announced that it is adding a new Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree program beginning Fall 2018.

The DNP program will focus on translation of research into advanced clinical practice to improve health outcomes. It builds on the traditional master’s nursing programs by providing education in evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and systems leadership.

Linda Sarna, dean of the UCLA School of Nursing, tells Newsroom.UCLA.edu, “The changing demands of a complex health care environment require the highest level of scientific knowledge and practice expertise. Our new DNP program is ideal for the advanced practice nurse who wants to translate nursing science to clinical practice and improve health care outcomes.”

Designed for working professionals, program classes will be offered on Fridays and some weekends, requiring seven quarters to complete the degree. Clinical hours can be obtained in the student’s work environment to offer convenience to working nurses who want to pursue further education.

The program also adds a central component called the Scholarly Project. Students will be required to demonstrate research and quality improvement skills by completing a project directly related to a practice issue in the clinical setting.

To learn more about UCLA’s new Doctor of Nursing Practice program, visit here.

Bethel University Launches Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

Bethel University Launches Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

Bethel University has announced the launch of a new Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree program, available in fall 2018. The DNP program is intended to prepare advanced practice nurses for roles in administration, public policy, advocacy, and specialized care.

Bethel has launched several other healthcare programs in recent year including a physician assistant program in 2015, and a variety of other nursing programs at the undergraduate and graduate level. According to Bethel.edu, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that demand for nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, nurse educators, and advanced practice nurses with DNP degrees is expected to grow by 31 percent in the next 10 years.

The DNP program will be offered primarily online, putting students on the cutting edge of medical trends with courses in biostatistics, epidemiology, informatics, and healthcare economics and policy. Students will apply evidence-based research, critical thinking skills, and learn to understand nursing from a business perspective to prepare them for roles in hospital management and academia.

Jane Wrede, program director and associate professor of nursing, tells Bethel.edu, “The DNP degree is focused on leadership and transformation in the workplace. Its purpose is to prepare advanced practice nurses to be leaders and change agents in their professional settings.”

Bethel University has pursued initial accreditation of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. To learn more about the launch of the new DNP program, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Cody Forsberg, Recent DNP Graduate, Follows in Grandfather’s Footsteps

Nurse of the Week: Cody Forsberg, Recent DNP Graduate, Follows in Grandfather’s Footsteps

Our Nurse of the Week is Cody Forsberg, a recent graduate of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program at Wichita State University (WSU), who decided to follow in his grandfather’s footsteps by pursuing a career in nursing. His grandfather passed away when Forsberg was just five years old, but they have a lot in common: nursing degrees from WSU and a passion to care for others.

Forsberg’s grandfather, Frank Hopkins, earned his bachelor’s and master’s degree in nursing from WSU in the 1970s after retiring from the Air Force. He later became a bedside nurse for the US Department of Veterans Affairs and taught nursing classes at a community college in Fayetteville, NC. Although his grandfather died when he was young, Forsberg grew up hearing stories of how compassionate his grandfather was and how much he cared about helping others in any way that he could.

Forsberg decided at an early age to follow in his grandfather’s footsteps of caring for people at their most vulnerable. He was also inspired by his grandmother, a retired nurse who spent her career working in labor and delivery. When he finished his bachelor’s degree in 2010, Forsberg’s grandmother passed down his grandfather’s nursing pin.

Forsberg tells Kansas.com, “Nursing for me is being there for people when they’re at their most vulnerable point in life. When they’re sick and unable to care for themselves, and their families are unable to care for them. And regardless of the healthcare discipline that you’re in, nurses are at the bedside 100 percent of the time.”

Now a nurse at Via Christi St. Francis Hospital, Forsberg graduated from WSU’s doctor of nursing practice program in December with a specialization as a family nurse practitioner. With a wife and young daughter at home, completing his DNP degree has shown Forsberg the strength that it takes to be a nurse.

To learn more about Cody Forsberg and his path to becoming a family nurse practitioner inspired by his grandfather’s career in nursing, visit here.

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