Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nursing—What You Need to Know

Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nursing—What You Need to Know

Working in gerontological nursing can be immensely rewarding, but in order to be successful, it’s critical to familiarize yourself with the characteristics unique to this age group. Here are some key areas to focus on if you are pursuing a career in adult-gerontology acute care nursing.

Bridge the Generation Gap

Generations previous to our own often have different sociocultural norms. Being mindful of this will facilitate their care. They may be uncomfortable being addressed by their first name, or they may be very private. Giving respect and space where needed will go a long way toward earning their trust and confidence, making it easier to care for them effectively.

Even elderly individuals without a cognitive impairment can experience a sudden change in mentation, often triggered by infection (UTIs are common culprits) or by a change in routine, geography or both. Safety is paramount, so be mindful of their room assignment as well as their potential for confusion to ensure that they are well monitored.

Making Sense

The elderly often lose acuity of one or more senses, so it’s important to accommodate these changes. Due to decreased activity levels, muscle mass, and food intake, they often complain of feeling cold. This is also attributable to chronic conditions such as anemia, kidney disease, underactive thyroid, or even the medications they take.

Offer them warm blankets, light jackets, or slipper socks to help their bodies retain warmth. Adjust the room temperature as appropriate. Elderly patients often will ask that their hot beverages or food be reheated. This alteration in heat perception is quite common in older patients, so reheat with caution to avoid injury.

Their hearing and vision are likely to be impaired to some degree, so speak deliberately and clearly. Let them see your face as you’re speaking. Repeat what you’ve said when asked. And encourage the use of eyeglasses and hearing aids where indicated.

The Physical

Functional impairments such as balance issues and weakness are common among the elderly. They should be closely monitored or assisted when ambulating. Be mindful of hazards that may cause falls: furniture placed too closely together, uneven walking surfaces, throw rugs, electrical cords, and IV tubing. Weakness may necessitate the use of assistive devices to ambulate. Monitor transfers to determine whether they may need greater assistance for the transfer order.

Due to their nutritional status, chronic conditions, and medication, many will have fragile skin—their skin may have a papery texture and is easily prone to tears and lacerations. Protect it by keeping it clean and well-moisturized. Choose an appropriate tape for dressings, IV tubing, etc.; this will help minimize damage to the skin and potential allergic reactions, or when appropriate use mesh sleeves.

Constipation is another common complaint, related to decreased fluid intake, reduced activity, and polypharmacy. Monitor their diet and fluid intake for fiber, nutrients, and adequate hydration; and encourage activity and fluids as tolerated per their doctor’s orders.

Want to know more about adult-gerontology acute care nursing? Visit here to determine which certification may be right for you.

Golden Careers: Gerontology in Action

Golden Careers: Gerontology in Action

Only one group of Americans has more than doubled in size over the past twenty years: the elderly. They’ve experienced more than most in their lifetimes, from world wars to the first man on the moon. Thanks to lengthening life spans, they have much more to experience; over 41.4 million Americans are 65 and older – that’s more than 13.3 percent of the total U.S. population.1

As this golden group ages, how can we serve and love the elders that hold such a special place in our communities and families?

GERONTOLOGY CAREERS

Case worker

The role of geriatric social workers includes:

  • Helping senior citizens cope with common problems experienced by the elderly
  • Ensuring the needs of their clients are met from day-to-day
  • Providing aid with financial issues, medical care, mental disorders and social problems

Geriatric care manager

Care managers help the elderly and their loved ones develop a long-term care plan and connect with necessary services.

Healthcare business manager

These managers make sure healthcare facilities provide the most effective patient care. This includes planning and coordinating services in hospitals and clinics.

Art therapist

Art therapy uses the visual and auditory arts to help restore function and general wellbeing. Benefits can include:

  • Increased cognitive skills
  • Intellectual stimulation
  • Improved motor skills
  • Alleviated pain
  • Socialization
  • Self-expression

78 percent of art therapists report working with older adults on a regular basis.2

Grief counselor

Grief counselors help seniors process bereavement and loss, as well as cope with thoughts of their own death.

Assisted living administrator

Administrators manage assisted living facilities or services, which provide care to adults who need help with daily tasks like bathing, eating and dressing.

Health educator

These educators provide the elderly with lessons that inform them about health concerns.

Physical therapist

Physical therapists help aging adults strengthen their muscles, increase mobility and improve endurance. They also help with recovery from an injury or illness.

HELPING AND HEALING

The elderly are likely to face hardships, but with our help, they don’t have to go through them alone.

Bereavement and loss

A natural part of the aging process is experiencing the loss of loved ones as well as coping with one’s own progressing age. Seniors often experience bereavement and loss differently than younger adults, which puts them at risk for depression, anxiety and PTSD. Grieving seniors can benefit from the support others as they work through difficult times.

75 percent of adults 50 and older reported finding humor and laughter in their daily lives.3

Family caregiving

Family caregivers play a crucial role in keeping the elderly comfortable at home by providing support like:

  • Economic resources
  • Loving relationships and companionship
  • Minimal health and wellness assistance
  • Support with day-to-day needs

More than 10 percent of the U.S. population have served as unpaid caregivers for older adults.4

Health promotion and self-care

Age can prevent seniors from properly taking care of their bodies, but we can help our loved ones stay beautiful and healthy. Helping the elderly groom themselves, receive regular medical attention and stay active can go a long way in promoting general wellbeing.

Disabilities

In more extreme cases, seniors may experience disabilities or other chronic health conditions. You can support older adults by ensuring they can access the healthcare professionals and resources they need. This might involve assistance with transportation and attending to business, legal and medical concerns.

75 percent of seniors have at least one chronic health condition, and most have two or more.5

End-of-life and palliative care

As our loved ones enter their final days, specialized care can help provide relief from the symptoms and stress. End-of-life and palliative care makes their last days as pain-free and comfortable as possible.

Quality of long-term care

Fortunately, there are a number of geriatric professionals trained to provide excellent care for aging adults in all of these areas. A growing population of the elderly means the demand for these practitioners is greater than ever – and there are more opportunities for you to bring wellness and care into the lives of the elderly than ever.

Interested in a career in a gerontology? Pursuing an online master’s degree can help. Learn more at: https://www.cune.edu/academics/graduate/master-healthcare-administration/gerontology/

SOURCES

  1. https://www.upi.com/133-percent-in-US-are-seniors/75971362689252/
  2. American Art Therapy Association
  3. https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/basics/info-2017/truth-about-grief.html
  4. https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/geriatrics/social-issues-in-the-elderly/family-caregiving-for-the-elderly
  5. National Council on Aging

This sponsored story is brought to you by Concordia University Nebraska.

What to Know if You’re Interested in a Career in Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nursing

What to Know if You’re Interested in a Career in Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nursing

It’s no secret that our elderly are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population, fueled largely by aging Boomers. So it’s simple to deduce that nursing careers in adult-gerontology can offer many opportunities for growth and nursing leadership. However, working effectively with this demographic requires specific skills for success.

Build the Basics

Nursing competencies should include a BSN and a minimum requirement of a firm base of experience in general medical-surgical nursing to care effectively for the disease processes that affect the elderly. Cardiac and respiratory conditions, diabetes, and cognitive impairments are among the most common pathologies troubling people over 55. Nurses must be adept with assessment skills to detect condition changes in their patients. Nurses advancing to management roles will be better prepared with their MSN, NP, and even a DNP.

Understand the Psychosocial

You’ll need capable skills for working with the most common psychosocial issues of those in their later years. Many elderly patients suffer from social isolation and depression, which can exacerbate physical issues they may be dealing with. Nurses will also need to demonstrate empathy and patience when working with those suffering from cognitive impairments such as dementia or Alzheimers. They must also demonstrate the ability to anticipate their patients’ needs when the patients aren’t able to articulate their needs themselves.

Assessment Skills are Critical

The health of elderly patients can be mercurial. Their immune systems are no longer as robust as they once were, and they’re often further influenced by other disease processes. Something seemingly routine and easily treated in younger patients, such as a urinary tract infection, can trigger a cascade of symptoms that can send many clinicians scrambling. A nurse well-versed in the care of the elderly will quickly identify the more subtle changes with accuracy.

Know Your Resources

A good geriatrics nurse also knows about the best resources to guide their patients to wellness. For example, making a patient or their family aware of adult day care centers in their neighborhood can lighten the load of caring for them during working hours. Asking the physician for a consult with a neurologist or psychologist for developing cognitive issues, or a urologist for intractable urinary infections facilitates the patient’s access to timely treatment. Requesting a referral to a social worker to address neglect or abuse issues in the patient’s home keeps the patient in a safe environment.

Interested in getting certified in adult-gerontology? Visit NursesGetCertified.com to learn more.

NP Gerontology Certifications: Which is Right for You?

NP Gerontology Certifications: Which is Right for You?

Earning certifications of any kind can definitely help your nursing career. If you work with adults in gerontology, you have a couple of choices. So, how do you choose the one that would work best for your particular situation?

Robin Dennison, DNP, APRN, CCNS, NEA-BC, Director of Nursing Programs at the University of Saint Augustine for Health Sciences, answered some basic questions about the differences between the two for Nurse Practitioners (NP).

Regarding gerontology certifications—specifically the ACNPC-AG and the AGPCNP-BC—what are the similarities between the two certifications? What are the major differences?

The ACNPC-AG (Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Certified in Adult-Gerontology) is offered by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) via the AACN Certification Corporation. The AGPCNP-BC (Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner certification) is offered by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)

Both certifications require a passing score on an examination after verification of eligibility. Eligibility for both certifications require a current, active RN license in a state or territory of the United States or the equivalent in another country. Eligibility for both certifications require the applicant to be a graduate of an adult-gerontology acute care nurse practitioner program accredited by either CCNE or ACEN. The program must have three separate graduate-level courses in advanced physiology/pathophysiology, advanced health assessment, and advanced pharmacology. They both require a minimum of 500 faculty-supervised practicum hours in the program. Eligibility for both requires submission of an official transcript.

While the fees are comparable, current memberships result in significant discounts. Membership in AACN or ANA results in a discount on the respective certification.

The test blueprints are similar, but the AACN certification has a greater percentage of the exam questions focused on clinical practice. The ANCC certification test blueprint has the majority of questions focused on clinical practice, but it has a greater percentage of questions focused on role-professional responsibilities and health care systems than the AACN examination.

How can nurses determine which one would be the better for them to pursue?

AACN, with its focus on critical care, would likely be the preference for a nurse who was previously a critical care nurse and held the CCRN credential. If the nurse did not have that previous affiliation with AACN, then they may select ANCC. It may even come down to the nurse’s memberships: AACN or ANA and the discounts that are given for the membership.

How could these certifications help them in their careers? Could having one of these help them get better paying jobs? Move up? Be experts in their field?

National certification in one of the advanced practice roles (i.e., nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nurse anesthetist, nurse midwife) is required for an eligibility for licensure as an advanced practice registered nurse in most states. The board of nursing in the state of residence will specify requirements for APRN licensure as well as standards of practice for the advanced practice role. Advanced practice licensure allows greater autonomy, authority, and generally higher salaries.

Apply now to get featured on NursesGetCertified.com!

Apply now to get featured on NursesGetCertified.com!

Are you an accomplished Family or Adult Gerontological Nurse Practitioner? It’s time for you to be in the spotlight! Springer Publishing is looking for a select group of rock star nurses to inspire and educate the next generation in your area of expertise. Apply now to be featured in our Day-In-The-Life profiles on our upcoming website, NursesGetCertified.com. Eligible candidates are:

  • Actively certified as an Adult Gerontology Primary Care or Family Nurse Practitioner
  • Working clinically in this area of certification
  • Interested in helping future nurses understand what life is like after the exam

Fill out our form by Tuesday, November 27th for your chance at this opportunity. Selected candidates will participate in a 30-minute interview which will be featured along with a photo on our new website. You’ll also receive a $25 Amazon gift card for participating. Join us in our mission to make nursing certification simple!

Johns Hopkins Nursing Faculty Sarah Szanton Named Director of Center for Innovative Care in Aging

Johns Hopkins Nursing Faculty Sarah Szanton Named Director of Center for Innovative Care in Aging

Sarah L. Szanton, PhD, ANP, FAAN, professor and director of the PhD program at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON), has been named director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging. Szanton is set to take over the roll in February 2018 from Laura Gitlin, PhD, who founded the center in 2011.

Patricia Davidson, PhD, MEd, RN, FAAN, dean of JHSON, tells Nursing.JHU.edu, “Dr. Szanton is a rising leader nationally and across the globe for her research and innovative solutions for aging populations.  We are excited for her to be the next leader of our center.”

Szanton has served as associate director for policy within the Center for Innovative Care in Aging since 2015. She also holds joint appointments within Johns Hopkins and is an adjunct faculty member for international universities including the American University of Beirut and the University of Technology, Sydney.

An expert researcher and practitioner in gerontology, Szanton will lead the Center’s efforts in advancing and supporting the well-being of older adults and their families using innovative approaches, policies, and practices. She is already doing so through her Community Aging in Place—Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE) program, which combines home visits from a nurse, occupational therapist, and handyman to help equip low-income older adults to live more safely in their homes. Her program has helped decrease disability, depression, and improve self care for participants.

To learn more about Szanton’s CAPABLE program and new role as Director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging at Johns Hopkins, visit here.

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