University of Maryland School of Nursing and State of Maryland Partner to Combat Opioid Addiction

University of Maryland School of Nursing and State of Maryland Partner to Combat Opioid Addiction

The Maryland Department of Health and Opioid Operational Command Center recently announced a new partnership between the University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) and Anne Arundel County Department of Health to use the Governor’s Wellmobile Program to deliver medication-assisted treatment to one of the areas of the state most affected by the heroin and opioid crisis.

The Wellmobile Program was established in 1994 to provide primary health care to uninsured and underserved residents across Maryland while also serving as interprofessional clinical education sites for students from the University of Maryland schools of nursing, law, social work, medicine, and pharmacy. Wellmobile now has four 33-foot-long medical vehicles providing more than 6,000 visits annually. The new partnership makes Wellmobile an innovative tool that gives rapid flexibility in addressing the opioid crisis.

Kathryn Lothschuetz Montgomery, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, chair, UMSON Department of Partnerships, Professional Education, and Practice, tells UMaryland.edu, “We are very pleased to partner with the Anne Arundel County Department of Health to pilot substance use treatment and recovery support services to persons struggling with an opioid addiction, while also providing a community-based learning environment for Maryland’s future nursing workforce.”

Staffing for the Wellmobile program, provided by the Anne Arundel County Department of Health, includes a nurse practitioner, physician, and peer-recovery coach. The new partnership with UMSON has added to the program’s list of services, including clinical care, health screenings, care management, referrals, and health promotion. UMSON students involved in the program will gain hands-on experience in treating addiction, consistent with a legislative mandate that Wellmobile provide students from the School of Nursing with opportunities to learn about the unique model of delivering healthcare services.

The pilot Wellmobile partnership program will be reviewed after 18 months to determine whether it will be deployed to treat opioid and heroin addiction in other areas of the state. To learn more about Wellmobile and its partnership with the University of Maryland School of Nursing, visit here.

Johns Hopkins Nursing Faculty Sarah Szanton Named Director of Center for Innovative Care in Aging

Johns Hopkins Nursing Faculty Sarah Szanton Named Director of Center for Innovative Care in Aging

Sarah L. Szanton, PhD, ANP, FAAN, professor and director of the PhD program at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON), has been named director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging. Szanton is set to take over the roll in February 2018 from Laura Gitlin, PhD, who founded the center in 2011.

Patricia Davidson, PhD, MEd, RN, FAAN, dean of JHSON, tells Nursing.JHU.edu, “Dr. Szanton is a rising leader nationally and across the globe for her research and innovative solutions for aging populations.  We are excited for her to be the next leader of our center.”

Szanton has served as associate director for policy within the Center for Innovative Care in Aging since 2015. She also holds joint appointments within Johns Hopkins and is an adjunct faculty member for international universities including the American University of Beirut and the University of Technology, Sydney.

An expert researcher and practitioner in gerontology, Szanton will lead the Center’s efforts in advancing and supporting the well-being of older adults and their families using innovative approaches, policies, and practices. She is already doing so through her Community Aging in Place—Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE) program, which combines home visits from a nurse, occupational therapist, and handyman to help equip low-income older adults to live more safely in their homes. Her program has helped decrease disability, depression, and improve self care for participants.

To learn more about Szanton’s CAPABLE program and new role as Director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging at Johns Hopkins, visit here.

University of Maryland School of Nursing Receives $2 Million Gift from Bill and Joanne Conway

University of Maryland School of Nursing Receives $2 Million Gift from Bill and Joanne Conway

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) recently received a $2 million gift from Bill and Joanne Conway’s Bedford Falls Foundation. Their donation was the third largest philanthropic gift the school has ever received and will be used to fund scholarships for UMSON students in financial need who are pursuing master’s, Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), and PhD degrees, or the school’s post-master’s Certificate in Teaching in Nursing and Health Professions. Recipients of these scholarships will be named Conway Scholars.

Funding scholarships won’t be the only thing the $2 million gift will go towards. It will also assist in expanding UMSON’s Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Program. The FNP program is currently only offered at the Baltimore campus and it’s a high demand program that can’t accommodate all qualified students. Enabling expanded enrollment will provide the region with more well-qualified primary care providers. UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, told Newswise.com,

“Maryland has an acute need for more – and more highly trained – nurses. The gift from Bill and Joanne Conway will be used to alleviate the state’s nursing shortage in two ways: enlarging the pool of nurses who can provide primary care to Maryland residents and enlarging the pool of faculty and instructors who can train nursing students.”

The Conways’ recent gift is the second seven-figure gift they’ve given to UMSON. Their first was a $5.24 million gift in April 2015, the largest in UMSON history. It’s still being used to fund over 150 full scholarships for Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students and increased opportunities for registered nurses (RNs) to obtain BSN degrees through UMSON’s RN-to-BSN program.

Conway Scholars will receive scholarships covering in-state tuition and fees. They must remain in good academic standing and have previously expressed commitments to serve as clinical preceptors or instructors, and secure full-time faculty positions within three years of graduating.

Nurse of the Week: Maryland High School Program Allows Students to Learn to Nurse by Practicing on Real Patients

Nurse of the Week: Maryland High School Program Allows Students to Learn to Nurse by Practicing on Real Patients

Our Nurse of the Week is Gaithersburg High School in Maryland where students are learning how to nurse by practicing on nursing home patients. As part of a partnership with Ingleside at King Farm, a Rockville retirement community with a nursing home on site, a dozen students from the high school program are training to become certified nursing assistants and geriatric nursing assistants.

Now in the second year of the intensive program, the goal is to prepare students for careers in healthcare. Students don’t pay tuition for the program funded by William Leahy, a neurologist on Ingleside’s board of directors who founded the program and hopes to expand it. The students are taught by Linda Hall, a nursing professor at Montgomery College’s Workforce Development and Continuing Education division.

Students in the program are part of a 4 day-a-week course that takes place outside school hours. It combines 88 hours of classroom learning with 60 hours of clinical training and working with actual residents at Ingleside. After completing the program, students are eligible to apply for nursing assistant state certification or take the geriatric nursing assistant (GNA) exam.

To learn more about the students in the program and their experiences, visit The Washington Post.

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Promotes Six Faculty Members to Full Professorship

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Promotes Six Faculty Members to Full Professorship

In the midst of a nationwide nursing shortage, many nursing schools around the country have attempted to increase their capacity for incoming classes which isn’t always possible because of insufficient faculty numbers. The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON) has responded by promoting six faculty members to full professorship.

In addition, 19 new faculty members were hired throughout 2016, adding faculty in new specialties including pediatrics, geriatrics, mental health, cardiovascular, community health, women’s health, and more. “With nurses ever in demand and a dire need for more faculty, I am excited to be able to combine the experience and expertise of our current and new faculty to help fill the need for nurses and teachers across the world,” said JHSON Dean Patricia Davidson in a press release from Newswise.com.  The six newly promoted faculty members include:

Department of Community-Public Health:

Hae-Ra Han, PhD, RN, FAAN

Sarah Szanton, PhD, ANP, FAAN

Elizabeth Tanner, PhD, RN, FAAN

Department of Acute and Chronic Care:

Deborah Finnell, DNS, PMHNP-BC, CARN-AP, FAAN

Cheryl Dennison Himmelfarb, PhD, RN, ANP, FAAN

Kathleen White, PhD, RN, NEA-BA, FAAN

You can read more about the JHSON faculty and their research, expertise, publications, awards, and honors here.

Next Avenue Names Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Professor Sarah Szanton a Top Influencer of Aging

Next Avenue Names Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Professor Sarah Szanton a Top Influencer of Aging

Sarah L. Szanton, an Associate Professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON), was named  one of the top 50 “Influencers in Aging” by Next Avenue, a digital publication covering perspectives on issues for older Americans.

Next Avenue’s list of influencers for 2016 included advocates, researchers, thought leaders, writers, and experts whose work is at the forefront of improving aging. Szanton was pleased to be highlighted among so many wonderful leaders who share a passion for aging. Older adults offer so much to a community and their vital wisdom, knowledge, and experience can become even more beneficial when we help them improve their ability to age through independence and other options. 

Dr. Szanton’s work on aging includes her innovative program titled Community Aging in Place – Advancing Better Liver for Elders (CAPABLE). The program incorporates home visits from a nurse, occupational therapist, and handyman to provide small home improvements like handrail installation or lowered cabinets to help older adults work on their mobility and self-care. Szanton’s program has made strides as a viable solution to improving health outcomes for older adults in the US and recent findings published in the health policy journal Health Affairs shows decreased disability, depression, and improved self-care amongst participants.

Beyond her CAPABLE study, Szanton has also researched and piloted strategies for preventing falls and examining the impact of food and energy access on the health outcomes of older adults. Szanton’s background is in policy analysis which she uses to inform policymakers about alternative, cost-effective solutions to save healthcare and taxpayer dollars while also improving the health and well-being of older adults, based off her research results. Dr. Szanton has been honored for her contributions as an American Academy of Nursing Emerging Edgerunner, a winner of the Protégé Award from the Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research, and named a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar.

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