Spacelabs Healthcare Invests $720,000 into Nursing Laboratory at University of Massachusetts Amherst

Spacelabs Healthcare Invests $720,000 into Nursing Laboratory at University of Massachusetts Amherst

Spacelabs Healthcare, a medical equipment manufacturer based in Washington, has invested $720,000 into the University of Massachusetts Amherst Center at Springfield’s nursing laboratory. The generous investment will benefit UMass Amherst’s College of Nursing Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing program, which serves as a pipeline for highly trained nurses to enter the region’s healthcare sector.

UMass Amherst Chancellor Kumble R. Subbaswamy tells UMass.edu, “It’s exciting that Spacelabs understands the benefits of investing in the College of Nursing. Nurses are at the frontline of healthcare, using these tools extensively. By providing our students with access to this equipment and fostering faculty research partnerships, Spacelabs has created an opportunity to develop the best possible healthcare management tools while contributing to our students’ educational experience and job training.”

The state-of-the-art equipment provided to the Springfield center includes two Sonicaid fetal/maternal monitors, ambulatory blood pressure monitors, multiple nursing monitors, and invasive cardiac outputs. Spacelabs’ gifts will help provide the opportunity to improve students’ experience in the nursing lab.

The 17-month Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program moved to the UMass Center in Springfield in 2017. Students training at the Springfield center are also in close proximity to leading healthcare facilities where they complete the clinical portion of their education. Since moving the program to Springfield, 10 new seats have been added to each incoming class.

Thanks to the new equipment, students can now practice at the level of real-world situations, developing critical thinking and psychomotor skills in a safe environment created specifically to enhance safety and health outcomes. To learn more about Spacelabs’ investment into UMass Amherst’s accelerated nursing program, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: UMass Lowell Nursing Alum Donna Manning Gives Back

Nurse of the Week: UMass Lowell Nursing Alum Donna Manning Gives Back

Our Nurse of the Week is Donna Manning, a graduate of the University of Massachusetts Lowell (UML), who is now giving back to her university and profession after finding her calling. After coming close to quitting nursing school in her final year, Manning pushed through and finished her degree, and pursued a career in oncology nursing that she came to love. Now, Manning’s goal is to give exceptional care without exception and to give back to the university that helped her find her passion.

When Manning could no longer afford tuition for nursing school going into her senior year, she decided that she had no option but to drop out and come back in a year. She arrived at the registrar’s office to withdraw, but the woman at the front desk gave her advice that changed the course of Manning’s life. The women told her: “They never come back. Don’t withdraw. Figure out a way.”

And that’s what Manning did. She asked her parents for help getting a car so that she could work and pay tuition, and she completed her nursing degree a year later. Now in a position to change the lives of others, Manning makes an effort to pay it forward in any way she can. She tells UML.edu, “My education at UMass Lowell instilled the important of ongoing education and lifelong learning. We are both inspired to give to keep public education affordable and give students the tools they need to thrive.”

Manning considered pursuing nursing management early in her career and earned an MBA at UMass Lowell in preparation but her hospital later merged with Boston City Hospital to become Boston Medical Center and she decided to stay with her oncology patients. Her husband also earned a business degree from UML and the couple have since funded endowed scholarships for students majoring in nursing and business, a global health initiative for nursing students, nursing simulation labs, teaching excellence awards, and donations to multiple capital projects.

Grateful for an education that allowed her to pursue her passion to help others, Manning plans to continue giving back to the university where her career started while giving back to her patients on a day-to-day basis. To learn more about Donna Manning and her career as an oncology nurse, visit here.

UMass College of Nursing Opens New Course on Human Trafficking

UMass College of Nursing Opens New Course on Human Trafficking

The University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass) College of Nursing is offering a new online course on human trafficking beginning this fall. The course will be taught by Donna Sabella, an expert in the field of human trafficking, and open to all academic disciplines so that graduate students in any program can gain knowledge on the subject.

A UMass press release about the course states, “The course will introduce students to what human trafficking is, how to identify victims, the health problems commonly associated with this population, special considerations to be aware of when working with trafficking victims and how to access services for them,” according to DailyCollegian.com.

Sabella says the course will introduce students to what human trafficking is, how to identify victims, the health problems commonly associated with this population, special considerations to be aware of when working with trafficking victims, and how to access services for them. The course is expected to be especially beneficial and of interest to nurses, health care professionals, law enforcement officers, teachers, and social workers.

UMass believes that education is imperative to addressing the issue of human trafficking. It’s increasingly important for nurses to have a grasp on social justice issues. As patient advocates and the voice for victims they treat, nurses need to know how to recognize human trafficking, understand how to communicate with the victim without putting them at increasing harm, and know what support systems and laws are available to help the victim.

To learn more about the UMass College of Nursing and its new online course on human trafficking, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Boston Nurse Jim Gosnell Has Donated 16 Gallons of Blood Over Lifetime

Nurse of the Week: Boston Nurse Jim Gosnell Has Donated 16 Gallons of Blood Over Lifetime

Our Nurse of the Week is Jim Gosnell, a nurse at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA, who has donated 16 gallons of blood over the last 30 years. Gosnell knows his blood type is O-negative, the universal blood type, and some of his donations go to the hospitals Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to help save children in need.

As a nurse, Gosnell gets pleasure out of knowing he’s helping someone every time he donates blood. Last Wednesday was World Blood Donor Day and it marked the 136th time Gosnell has donated. Although he’s already donated so much, he has a goal of donating 20 gallons. He says donating blood regularly is easy and it’s a great habit to get into, so he’s not done yet.

Dr. Richard Kaufman who heads the donor operation at Brigham tells Boston CBS, “Less than 5% of people who are eligible to donate actually donate. Any transfusion that’s given has the potential to save one or more lives, and it’s a very nice thing to be able to do for people.”

Gosnell says, “I donate about every 56 days. That’s when I’m eligible to donate.” He also encourages everyone who is able to get out and donate when they can.

Elms College School of Nursing Adds New Graduate Programs to Meet Mass. School Nurse Needs

Elms College School of Nursing Adds New Graduate Programs to Meet Mass. School Nurse Needs

The Elms College School of Nursing in Chicopee, Mass. recently announced a new Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree and graduate certificate in school nursing program to help expand opportunities for school nurses to meet state education requirements. Massachusetts school nurses are required to earn board certification in school nursing or their MSN degree within five years of employment and currently there is only one graduate program in New England that focuses on school nursing.

School nurses see large numbers of students with a wide array of needs, sometimes spread over several schools as our country faces a shortage of nurses, especially in schools. They must be able to assess; diagnose; identify outcomes; plan, implement, and coordinate care; and teach healthy practices to their students while working with several other healthcare professionals when needed from physicians to counselors to classroom aides.

The school nurse track offered at Elms will be comprised of MSN curriculum components, with a focus on school nursing that includes core graduate nursing classes, direct-care courses, school nurse professional standards, technology and informatics, and school nurse practicums. The school nurse certificate won’t fulfill state board-certification requirements, but it benefits nurses with a graduate degree in another discipline who want to improve their school nursing knowledge base.

All BSN nurses at Elms College will be eligible to enroll in the school nursing graduate certificate which consists of 12 credits and three class options: classroom attendance, livestream, or archived videos. The first group of students enrolled in the graduate core classes will begin in Fall 2017, and school nursing functional content courses will roll out in Spring 2018.

Komen Foundation Grant Awarded to UMass Amherst Nursing Professor to Develop Breast Cancer Survivor Toolkit

Komen Foundation Grant Awarded to UMass Amherst Nursing Professor to Develop Breast Cancer Survivor Toolkit

The Susan G. Komen Foundation for Breast Cancer Research recently awarded Rachel Walker with the Career Catalyst Research Award for $450,000. Walker is an assistant professor and nurse scientist at the University of Massachusetts (UMass) Amherst College of Nursing. Out of five research teams who received the award this year, Walker’s was the only nurse-led team.

Walker’s work will build on her previous research at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Innovative Care in Aging. Over the course of three years, Walker will be working with a multidisciplinary team to develop an “off-the-shelf survivorship toolkit” for breast cancer survivors. With a goal of helping breast cancer survivors take control of their health, Walker’s study will track the health of participants using wearable technology to reduce symptom interference, support goal achievement, and increase activity.

With help from Innovation Fellows from UMass Amherst’s Isenberg School of Management and the Institute for Applied Life Sciences, Walker’s team hopes to have a scalable product developed and widely accessible at the end of her study. She believes in the long-term potential of her approach for maintaining wellness for a variety of health settings and communities.

To learn more about Walker’s background and her upcoming study, visit UMass.edu.

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