UMass Dartmouth Doctoral Nursing Student Receives Jonas Philanthropies Grant

UMass Dartmouth Doctoral Nursing Student Receives Jonas Philanthropies Grant

A University of Massachusetts Dartmouth student was recently awarded a $10,000 grant from Jonas Philanthropies. Christine Fournier Bell, a second-year nursing Ph.D student, received the Jonas Nurse Scholar grant for studying the effects of combined educational and behavioral intervention on pain management practices.

“Christine was chosen for this honor based on her scholarly record and her commitment to improving the care of persons with substance use disorders through nursing intervention in the acute care setting,” said UMass Dartmouth College of Nursing Dean Kimberly Christopher. “We are very proud of Christine Bell and of our Ph.D. program. This is a wonderful testament to our program.”

Bell is the second Jonas Scholar from UMass Dartmouth. In addition to receiving the grant, she will participate in the Jonas Nurse Leaders Program in Washington DC.

“I am humbled and grateful for such an honor,” Bell shared with the UMass Dartmouth Office of Public Affairs. “As a nurse who cares deeply for this population, I look forward to working alongside nurses to find new ways to provide innovative care and treatment to people living with the disease of substance use disorder. There is always hope.”

Launched in 2008, the Jonas Nurse Scholars program has awarded more than 1,000 scholars across the US. The invitation-only program supports development of doctoral nursing students to address the nationwide nursing faculty shortage.

For more information about the Jonas Scholars and Jonas Philanthropies, click here. For more information about the UMass Dartmouth College of Nursing, click here.

Massachusetts Hospitals Oppose Initiative for Mandated Nurse Staffing Ratios

Massachusetts Hospitals Oppose Initiative for Mandated Nurse Staffing Ratios

Earlier this year, the Massachusetts Nurses Association proposed a ballot initiative to mandate nurse staffing ratios in Massachusetts hospitals. The proposed mandate would lead to the reduction of 1,000 behavioral health beds, increase emergency room boarding for mental health patients, and decrease access to recovery services statewide according to a study by the Massachusetts Association of Behavioral Health Systems.

The mandate calls for one nurse to be responsible for no more than four typical medical or surgical patients at a given time. Different guidelines would apply for sicker patients and staffing ratios would differ by unit. Supporters of the initiative argue that legislating nurse-to-patient ratios will improve patient care. Nurses are currently overworked, which keeps them from doing their best and can lead to medical errors.

David Matteodo, executive director of the hospital association, tells BeckersHospitalReview.com, “If the initiative passes, it will result in a 38 percent decrease in patient volume. That’s the equivalent of removing roughly 1,000 behavioral health beds from service. This result would be devastating to both patients and the behavioral health system as a whole, as there would be no place for displaced patients to go when they are in acute distress and need immediate behavioral health services.”

The Coalition to Protect Patient Safety opposes the initiative and was assembled by the Massachusetts Health and Hospital Association, which argues that the proposal would negatively affect nurse care delivery.

Under the initiative, emergency departments at maximum nurse-to-patient ratios would have to turn away patients. Patients seeking inpatient psychiatric or substance abuse care in an emergency department would have to wait longer for a bed and mental health providers would face nurse recruitment challenges to meet staffing mandates.

To learn more about the Massachusetts Nurses Association proposed ballet initiative to mandate nurse staffing ratios in Massachusetts hospitals, visit here.

Spacelabs Healthcare Invests $720,000 into Nursing Laboratory at University of Massachusetts Amherst

Spacelabs Healthcare Invests $720,000 into Nursing Laboratory at University of Massachusetts Amherst

Spacelabs Healthcare, a medical equipment manufacturer based in Washington, has invested $720,000 into the University of Massachusetts Amherst Center at Springfield’s nursing laboratory. The generous investment will benefit UMass Amherst’s College of Nursing Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing program, which serves as a pipeline for highly trained nurses to enter the region’s healthcare sector.

UMass Amherst Chancellor Kumble R. Subbaswamy tells UMass.edu, “It’s exciting that Spacelabs understands the benefits of investing in the College of Nursing. Nurses are at the frontline of healthcare, using these tools extensively. By providing our students with access to this equipment and fostering faculty research partnerships, Spacelabs has created an opportunity to develop the best possible healthcare management tools while contributing to our students’ educational experience and job training.”

The state-of-the-art equipment provided to the Springfield center includes two Sonicaid fetal/maternal monitors, ambulatory blood pressure monitors, multiple nursing monitors, and invasive cardiac outputs. Spacelabs’ gifts will help provide the opportunity to improve students’ experience in the nursing lab.

The 17-month Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program moved to the UMass Center in Springfield in 2017. Students training at the Springfield center are also in close proximity to leading healthcare facilities where they complete the clinical portion of their education. Since moving the program to Springfield, 10 new seats have been added to each incoming class.

Thanks to the new equipment, students can now practice at the level of real-world situations, developing critical thinking and psychomotor skills in a safe environment created specifically to enhance safety and health outcomes. To learn more about Spacelabs’ investment into UMass Amherst’s accelerated nursing program, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: UMass Lowell Nursing Alum Donna Manning Gives Back

Nurse of the Week: UMass Lowell Nursing Alum Donna Manning Gives Back

Our Nurse of the Week is Donna Manning, a graduate of the University of Massachusetts Lowell (UML), who is now giving back to her university and profession after finding her calling. After coming close to quitting nursing school in her final year, Manning pushed through and finished her degree, and pursued a career in oncology nursing that she came to love. Now, Manning’s goal is to give exceptional care without exception and to give back to the university that helped her find her passion.

When Manning could no longer afford tuition for nursing school going into her senior year, she decided that she had no option but to drop out and come back in a year. She arrived at the registrar’s office to withdraw, but the woman at the front desk gave her advice that changed the course of Manning’s life. The women told her: “They never come back. Don’t withdraw. Figure out a way.”

And that’s what Manning did. She asked her parents for help getting a car so that she could work and pay tuition, and she completed her nursing degree a year later. Now in a position to change the lives of others, Manning makes an effort to pay it forward in any way she can. She tells UML.edu, “My education at UMass Lowell instilled the important of ongoing education and lifelong learning. We are both inspired to give to keep public education affordable and give students the tools they need to thrive.”

Manning considered pursuing nursing management early in her career and earned an MBA at UMass Lowell in preparation but her hospital later merged with Boston City Hospital to become Boston Medical Center and she decided to stay with her oncology patients. Her husband also earned a business degree from UML and the couple have since funded endowed scholarships for students majoring in nursing and business, a global health initiative for nursing students, nursing simulation labs, teaching excellence awards, and donations to multiple capital projects.

Grateful for an education that allowed her to pursue her passion to help others, Manning plans to continue giving back to the university where her career started while giving back to her patients on a day-to-day basis. To learn more about Donna Manning and her career as an oncology nurse, visit here.

UMass College of Nursing Opens New Course on Human Trafficking

UMass College of Nursing Opens New Course on Human Trafficking

The University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass) College of Nursing is offering a new online course on human trafficking beginning this fall. The course will be taught by Donna Sabella, an expert in the field of human trafficking, and open to all academic disciplines so that graduate students in any program can gain knowledge on the subject.

A UMass press release about the course states, “The course will introduce students to what human trafficking is, how to identify victims, the health problems commonly associated with this population, special considerations to be aware of when working with trafficking victims and how to access services for them,” according to DailyCollegian.com.

Sabella says the course will introduce students to what human trafficking is, how to identify victims, the health problems commonly associated with this population, special considerations to be aware of when working with trafficking victims, and how to access services for them. The course is expected to be especially beneficial and of interest to nurses, health care professionals, law enforcement officers, teachers, and social workers.

UMass believes that education is imperative to addressing the issue of human trafficking. It’s increasingly important for nurses to have a grasp on social justice issues. As patient advocates and the voice for victims they treat, nurses need to know how to recognize human trafficking, understand how to communicate with the victim without putting them at increasing harm, and know what support systems and laws are available to help the victim.

To learn more about the UMass College of Nursing and its new online course on human trafficking, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Boston Nurse Jim Gosnell Has Donated 16 Gallons of Blood Over Lifetime

Nurse of the Week: Boston Nurse Jim Gosnell Has Donated 16 Gallons of Blood Over Lifetime

Our Nurse of the Week is Jim Gosnell, a nurse at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA, who has donated 16 gallons of blood over the last 30 years. Gosnell knows his blood type is O-negative, the universal blood type, and some of his donations go to the hospitals Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to help save children in need.

As a nurse, Gosnell gets pleasure out of knowing he’s helping someone every time he donates blood. Last Wednesday was World Blood Donor Day and it marked the 136th time Gosnell has donated. Although he’s already donated so much, he has a goal of donating 20 gallons. He says donating blood regularly is easy and it’s a great habit to get into, so he’s not done yet.

Dr. Richard Kaufman who heads the donor operation at Brigham tells Boston CBS, “Less than 5% of people who are eligible to donate actually donate. Any transfusion that’s given has the potential to save one or more lives, and it’s a very nice thing to be able to do for people.”

Gosnell says, “I donate about every 56 days. That’s when I’m eligible to donate.” He also encourages everyone who is able to get out and donate when they can.

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