What to Expect at a VA Virtual Career Fair

What to Expect at a VA Virtual Career Fair

There’s no question that job searches have become increasingly virtual. Email, digital job boards and even video interviews are quickly replacing physical resumes, classified ads and traditional interviews. Virtual job fairs are the latest development in this trend, and they’ve seen another bump in popularity due to travel restrictions and physical distancing.

While they lack face-to-face interaction, online career fairs offer more flexibility and less time commitment. If you are seeking a position in another city, you can chat with recruiters without leaving home.

VA is one of many employers moving to online career events, including job fairs, for the remainder of 2020. We host events through Brazen, a popular virtual job fair software, and take part in virtual events hosted by other groups. For instance, we recently participated in a health care technology management virtual career fair for biomedical engineers.

What to Expect

If you’ve never been to a virtual job fair before, the prospect of attending one might feel a little confusing and even daunting.

Like a traditional job fair, virtual career fairs bring together employers and job seekers for a set period of time on a particular date. But instead of face-to-face interaction, you’ll connect via text, web chat, video conferencing or email.

“Make sure you find a virtual career fair that is a good match. You want to attend one for the occupation you’re seeking,” recommended Mike Owens, recruitment marketing program specialist at VA.

VA Virtual Career Fair Lobby
VA Career Fair Lobby

Once you’ve found a fair that interests you, the first step is to register and upload a resume. VA’s virtual career fairs are free to job seekers.

From there, every virtual career fair is set up a little differently depending on the host.

VA’s online career fairs include a 10-15 minute pre-scheduled text chat with a recruiter, during which you can learn about jobs that are available in your area and get tips on submitting a stand-out application.

“To make the most of your appointment, ask as many questions as possible to the VA reps and make sure you prepare them ahead of time,” Owens said.

VA Virtual Career Fair Booth
VA Career Fair Live Chat Booth

You can use a smartphone, tablet or computer with a reliable internet or wireless connection to connect. Our virtual career fairs are compatible with all internet browsers but work best with Chrome.

For job fairs with multiple employers, you might see a simple list of employers while others will use virtual environments to simulate a real-world career fair. While you can often move at your own pace, some fairs have specific times for chats, webcasts or online presentations with companies.

VA Virtual Open House

A VA Virtual Open House is open every Wednesday at 12 noon EST from now through October 28, 2020.

Attendees can:

  • Learn more about open positions at VA facilities across the country. 
  • Talk to VA recruiters about how to apply for open positions. 
  • Ask questions about starting your career at VA, the hiring process and the available benefits.

Event Website: https://app.brazenconnect.com/a/dva/s/GKo7G/next

Event Start Date: 09/09/2020

Event End Date: 10/28/2020

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: General Health Care

Work at VA

Considering a VA career? A virtual event is the perfect way to learn more from the comfort of your own home.

GWU Receives 2.5 Million for Veterans’ BSN Aid Program

GWU Receives 2.5 Million for Veterans’ BSN Aid Program

The George Washington University School of Nursing has just received the largest philanthropic gift in the school’s history. Through the William and Joanne Conway Transitioning Warriors Nursing Scholars Initiative, $2.5 million in financial aid is being made available to help eligible military veterans working toward a BSN degree. The gift is expected to support more than 65 students over the next five years.

Donors William Conway, co-founder of The Carlyle Group, and his wife Joanne are long-time supporters of nursing education. School of Nursing Dean Pamela Jeffries commented, “The Conways’ commitment to our military veterans is unwavering, and so is ours at the GW School of Nursing. As we celebrate our 10th anniversary, it’s gifts like these that enable us to grow our veteran student population and provide the resources they need to succeed.”

The aid program will be welcomed by veterans. Despite the assistance available through military benefits such as the GI Bill, many vets still find it a challenge to support themselves and their families when they re-enter the civilian world and attempt to pursue a degree. The Conways are happy to offer a helping hand. “The Transitioning Warriors Nursing Scholars Initiative is designed to reward the brave men and women of our armed forces who seek to continue their service to our country as civilian nurses,” Mr. Conway stated. GWU President Thomas LeBlanc responded, “We are grateful to the Conways for enabling this investment when our nation’s nursing workforce and veterans need it most.”

Founded 10 years ago, the George Washington University School of Nursing is currently the sixth ranked school in the US News and World Report assessment of online graduate nursing programs. The gift was presented in May, while the school was celebrating its 10th anniversary.

For further details on this story, visit GWToday at the University website.

VA Needs Healthcare Providers for Female Vets

VA Needs Healthcare Providers for Female Vets

As the number of female Veterans has grown — tripling in just the last 20 years — VA has pivoted its care models to meet their needs. Women are the fastest growing Veteran group, accounting for about 10% of the nation’s Veterans.

At every VA medical center, designated women’s health providers coordinate care for female Veterans to ensure they receive equitable, timely care from a single primary care provider.

“Women who are assigned to a women’s health primary care provider have higher satisfaction and higher quality of gender-specific care,” said Dr. Patricia Hayes, VA’s chief consultant for women’s health services.

“They are twice as likely to choose to stay in VA care over time. That is why we are concentrating our efforts on training staff and actively recruiting additional providers with experience in women’s health care.”

Are you as committed as we are to providing the best care to the brave women who have served our country? Consider a career in women’s health at VA.

A Veteran-centered approach

You’ll be a vital part of Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACTs). The PACTs are centered on Veterans and include family members, caregivers and a range of health care professionals — from gynecologists to mental health providers to medical assistants.

Designated women’s health providers coordinate all care for female Veterans, including:

  • General medical care for acute or chronic illnesses.
  • Preventive care such as nutrition counseling, weight control and smoking cessation.
  • Gender-specific care such as mammograms, birth control, menopause care and more.
  • Specialty services for depression, homelessness, military sexual trauma (MST), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance abuse.

Our Women Veterans Health Program, founded in 1988, works everyday to strengthen and refine the care we provide to female Veterans.

For example, we’ve recently ramped up our support of rural health care providers, since approximately one in four female Veterans live in a rural area. This new program provides onsite women’s health training for rural primary care teams. Providers and nurses train side-by-side, receiving more than 18 hours of accredited medical training.

“Our goal at VA is to be the place where women who have proudly served their country receive excellent care in a safe, sensitive climate where they feel at home,” wrote VA Secretary Robert Wilkie.

Generous rewards

A wide range of benefits are available to VA primary care providers, such as:

  • A competitive starting salary based on education, training and experience.
  • Periodic pay raises that address inflation and local market changes.
  • Incentive and performance awards, including superior performance awards, special contribution awards, quality step increases, VA honor awards, non-monetary recognition and Title 38 awards.
  • Up to 49 days off, including vacation days that begin accruing immediately and sick time that doesn’t expire.
  • Premium-support group health insurance, including dental, vision and long-term care, that may become effective on the first full pay period after you start.
  • Enrollment in the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS), a three-tier retirement plan composed of Social Security benefits, FERS basic benefits and the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP).

You can work anywhere in the United States and its territories with one active license, and all your benefits transition with you if you move to a new facility.

Come and #WorkatVA

Bring your background in women’s health care to VA and help us serve female Veterans.

Want to Be a Psychiatric Nurse at VHA? Five Groups You’ll Make an Impact On

Want to Be a Psychiatric Nurse at VHA? Five Groups You’ll Make an Impact On

You entered the field of psychiatric nursing because you wanted to make a difference in the lives of patients. As a psychiatric nurse with VHA, you’ll do that and more. Not only will you play a critical role in changing the lives of Veterans, often in the most challenging stage of their life, but you’ll work with their network of family and friends to provide whole healing and a successful outcome. Learn more about the specific Veteran populations you’ll be working with and the opportunities for making an impact.

1. The families of Veterans

VA offers a range of family services for Veterans and their family members, including family education, brief problem-focused consultation, family psychoeducation, and marriage and family counseling. Our psychiatric nurses play an integral part in facilitating these services, working with all members of the family to provide holistic solutions.

2. Homeless Veterans

VA is the only Federal agency that provides substantial hands-on assistance directly to homeless Veterans. As a VHA psychiatric nurse, you’ll have the unique opportunity to step outside the hospital walls and treat Veterans who would not otherwise seek help. Additional VA assistance programs where you can make an impact include:

  • Drop-in centers where Veterans who are homeless can shower, get a meal, and get help with a job or getting back into society
  • Transitional housing in community-based programs
  • Long-term assistance, case management and rehabilitation

3. Veterans with Serious Mental Illness

Veterans diagnosed with Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder and Bipolar Disorder work with VHA psychiatric nurses on a variety of treatment plans, including psychosocial rehabilitation and recovery services to optimize functioning. In addition, you’ll be a part of our Mental Health Intensive Case Management team. The team of mental health physicians, nurses, psychologists and social workers helps Veterans experiencing symptoms of severe mental illness cope with their symptoms and live more successfully at home and in the community.

4. Veterans adjusting to civilian life

The transition process from military to civilian life is a challenging one, and our psychiatric nurses are there from the beginning to provide crucial support. At our 300 community-based Vet Centers, our staff provides adjustment counseling and outreach services to all Veterans who served in any combat zone. Services are also available for family members for military-related issues, and bereavement counseling is offered for parents, spouses and children of Armed Forces, National Guard and Reserve personnel who died in the service of their country.

5. Older Veterans

To provide specialized care for our older Veterans, we’ve developed VA Community Living Centers (CLCs). Here, you will treat older Veterans needing temporary assisted care until they can return home or find placement in a nursing home. Our staff also works on ensuring that Veterans can safely live independently by screening for dementia and general assessments that help us decide whether the Veteran can make informed medical decisions.

As a psychiatric nurse at VHA, the work you do will deeply affect the Veteran, their family and generations of families to come. View our Nursing positions or, Join VA in making a difference in one of the many other health care fields available.

This story was originally posted on VAntage Point.

VA Nurse Gives a Family the Chance to Say Goodbye

VA Nurse Gives a Family the Chance to Say Goodbye

CPR in a restaurant on a woman not breathing

Here is just one story about how VA nurses excel in their occupation, on and off duty.

VA Nurse Karen Brodlo sat in a restaurant enjoying her dinner when she heard someone yell to call 911.

She looked up to see an elderly woman had collapsed and was not breathing. The woman was having dinner with her husband when the night took a turn for the worst.

Brodlo quickly jumped in action. As a VA nurse for 23 years and in the nursing field since 1969, it was second nature. She identified herself to the crowd as a nurse and assessed the situation.  Right away she noticed that the woman was positioned incorrectly.  She quickly made the adjustments and started to administer CPR.

She continued manual CPR process until the rescue team arrived. She then turned her focus to the husband who was nervous and scared for his wife’s well-being. She tried to calm him down as the rescue team continued to work to save the woman’s life.

She remembers the worst part being, not having the equipment she needed. She suggested to the restaurant after the incident that a general-use defibrillator would be a useful addition.  Just as most businesses have fire extinguishers, a defibrillator should also be a requirement. Just as easy to use, it’s better to have and not need it than to need it and not have it.

After much praise came her way for saving a life, Brodlo said, “I just did what was right. No accolades are needed for doing my job.”

The restaurant now gives her star treatment. The daughter of the woman she saved sent a bouquet of flowers along with a heartfelt thank you card calling Brodlo her mom’s “Guardian Angel.”

Brodlo is a nurse at the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center in North Chicago.

As a caring nurse who adores her job, she followed up on the status of her honorary patient. Sadly, a couple of weeks after the incident, the woman passed away from further complications, but the family was overwhelmingly grateful.

The last days with any family member or loved one is crucial. If it wasn’t for the quick actions of nurse Karen Brodlo, they would have missed out on the opportunity to say their last goodbye.

This story was originally posted on VAntage Point.

VA North Texas Nurse Uses 44 Years of Service to Mentor Next Generation

VA North Texas Nurse Uses 44 Years of Service to Mentor Next Generation

In 1975, with the Vietnam War still fresh in the minds of the American public, most high school senior graduation plans did not include joining the U.S. Army. But for eighteen-year-old Virginia “Ginny” Warren, the North Texas daughter of a cotton farmer, the Army looked like an ideal path. Much to the chagrin of her father, Ginny Warren had just set forth on a 44-year journey from soldier to VA Nurse.

“The Army offered me a way to broaden my horizons and to learn,” said Warren, Nurse Manager at VA North Texas Health Care System.

Warren began her military career with two-years in medical administrative field before spending the next twenty-two years as a medic with the U.S. Army Reserve’s 94thCombat Support Hospital, based in Seagoville, Texas. With a primary mission to take a 150-person deployable hospital anywhere in the world and be ready to receive casualties within 72 hours of arrival, Warren continuously trained for the opportunity to apply her talents while developing a new passion to become a Registered Nurse (RN).

Through her career in the Reserves, the Army sent Warren to licensed vocational nurse (LVN) training and Warren quickly realized she had an aptitude and attitude for nursing. Warren went on to attend the University of Texas at Tyler School of Nursing to become a RN and was subsequently commissioned in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps.

“I had to find my place as a new nurse and new military officer,” said Warren. “I had a lot to learn, but I felt I had a lot to offer as well.”

After becoming an RN, Warren brought her health care experience to VA and joined another family of nursing professionals at VA North Texas in 1997.

In 2003, Warren’s Reserve unit was called upon to deploy to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center to treat wounded servicemembers straight from the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan. The ability to muster tremendous internal strength and compassion, coupled with her many years of training to deploy on a moment’s notice, was exactly what the soldiers, Marines and airman she treated would need to make their next journey back stateside to recover with family and friends.

“I vividly remember leaning over this big sergeant, hugging him, and whispering in his ear that it would be okay, and the pain won’t last,” said Warren.

Warren would go on to give more than 40 years in uniform, retiring as a field grade officer in 2015.

With over 22 years of service as a VA nurse, Warren now walks the inpatient wards of the Dallas VA Medical Center where she once served as junior nurse, as a manager and mentor to a new generation of nursing professionals who rely on her expertise and experience to care for many of the 134,000 active patients who use VA North Texas for their health care each year.

“Nursing is not just a career, it’s a passion and a devotion,” said Sheila Wise, VA North Texas Nurse Manager, and herself a retired U.S. Army Nurse. “To bring that passion and devotion to the service of our Veterans the way the Ginny has, and continues to do every day, for as long as she has, makes her an inspiration and a guiding figure for our nursing team. She makes all of us better.”

While eighteen-year-old Ginny Warren could have never foreseen the impact she would have on our nation through her service to military servicemembers and Veterans over 44 years, the nearly 3,000 nurses who apply their skills at VA North Texas are glad that the cotton farmer’s daughter left home to make the journey of a lifetime.

“Nursing has always been where I could pour my heart and soul,” said Warren. “I can’t imagine doing anything else.”

This story was originally posted on VAntage Point.

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