Illinois State University Mennonite College of Nursing Celebrates 100 Years

Illinois State University Mennonite College of Nursing Celebrates 100 Years

As the 2018-19 academic year kicks off, Illinois State University’s (ISU) Mennonite College of Nursing (MCN) is celebrating 100 Years of Excellence. A kickoff event will be held on August 28 to commemorate the event.

At the kickoff, keynote speaker Jeffrey Bauer will present Creating Futures & Preparing Professionals: The Next 100 Years at MCN. Bauer is a health futurist and medical economist with over 40 years of experience in teaching and consulting. His current focus is on improving the medical marketplace, including helping healthcare leaders develop strategies for more effective health care.

Judy Neubrander, dean of the Mennonite College of Nursing, tells News.IllinoisState.edu, “We are thrilled to launch our year-long celebration of Mennonite College of Nursing’s 100th anniversary with this event. Dr. Bauer comes to us with an extraordinary depth of knowledge regarding the future of healthcare. As we commemorate a century of educating exceptional nurse professionals, we are eager to hear Dr. Bauer’s thoughts about where the next 100 years will take us.”

The original ISU nursing school, the Mennonite Sanitarium Training School, was founded on January 23, 1919, and the school’s first commencement took place in 1922 with a class of 15 graduates. In May 2018, more than 200 undergraduate and graduate nursing students received their degrees.

MCN became Illinois State University’s sixth academic college in 1999 and has since increased enrollment, added to its master’s degree offerings, and created two doctoral nursing programs (PhD in Nursing and an online Doctor of Nursing Practice degree), as well as an accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing option.

To learn more about the 100 year celebration of Illinois State University’s Mennonite College of Nursing, visit here.

University of Arkansas Clinical Instructors Named to 40 Nurse Leaders Under 40 by Arkansas Center for Nursing

University of Arkansas Clinical Instructors Named to 40 Nurse Leaders Under 40 by Arkansas Center for Nursing

Nick Hopkins and Jaclyn Johnson, clinical instructors for the Eleanor Mann School of Nursing at the University of Arkansas (U of A), were named this summer to the 40 Nurse Leaders Under 40 list by the Arkansas Center for Nursing.

The Arkansas Center for Nursing, Inc. is intended to promote a culture of health for the citizens of Arkansas by advancing nursing education, practice, leadership, and workforce development. The 40 Nurse Leaders Under 40 program is designed to recognize nurses who have shown exemplar dedication to the nursing profession. The recognized nurse leaders are acknowledged as community outreach servants for their continued promise to grow in leadership and advance the nursing profession.

Hopkins earned his Bachelor of Science in Nursing from U of A in 2014 and is pursuing a Master of Science in Nursing from U of A for Medical Sciences to become a psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner. Johnson earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from U of A in 2013 and her master’s degree in nursing education from Western Governors University in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 2017.

Now, Hopkins teaches mental health nursing at U of A and mentors student nurses working toward earning their bachelor’s degrees. Johnson is a clinical instructor who teaches first-semester nursing students at U of A and mentors nurses on how to pursue their career goals.

To learn more about Hopkins and Johnson’s accomplishments as nursing professionals and recognition on the 40 Nurse Leaders Under 40 list by the Arkansas Center for Nursing, visit here.

University at Buffalo Nursing Researchers Named to 2018 Class of American Academy of Nursing Fellows

University at Buffalo Nursing Researchers Named to 2018 Class of American Academy of Nursing Fellows

Two University at Buffalo (UB) School of Nursing faculty members, Yu-Ping Chang, PhD, and Sharon Hewner, PhD, have been named fellows of the American Academy of Nursing (AAN). Fellows are recognized for their contributions to nursing and health care and their influence on health care policy.

Yu-Ping Chang is a Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Endowed Professor and associate dean for research and scholarship in the UB School of Nursing. Her research is focused on mental health, prescription drug misuse and addictions in older adults, and caregiving and medication management for individuals with dementia.

Sharon Hewner is an associate professor in the UB School of Nursing and her research is focused on transitions of care, and health services and informatics. Her research aided in the discovery that post-discharge telephone calls may reduce hospital readmission rates for high-risk patients, and the development of an automated discharge summary that could quicken communication between hospitals and primary care physicians.

UB School of Nursing Dean Marsha Lewis, PhD, tells Buffalo.edu, “The impact of their research nationally and internationally is clearly evident in this AAN fellowship, an elite group including approximately 2,500 nurse leaders (of more than 3 million professional nurses in the US) who have been recognized by their peers as accomplishing extraordinary milestones in their nursing careers. Drs. Chang and Hewner join a number of faculty in the UB School of Nursing who are fellows of the academy.”

Chang and Hewner, along with the rest of their class of 2018 AAN fellows, will be recognized at the AAN 2018 Transforming Health, Driving Policy Conference this coming November. To learn more about University at Buffalo nurse researchers Yu-Ping Chang and Sharon Hewner, visit here.

NYU College of Nursing Receives $1.9 Million Grant to Establish Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations

NYU College of Nursing Receives $1.9 Million Grant to Establish Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations

The New York University (NYU) Rory Meyers College of Nursing has been awarded a $1.9 million, five-year grant from the National Institute for Nursing Research (NINR) to establish the NYU Meyers Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations.

According to NYU.edu, the new center will be designated to developing a team of nurse scientists dedicated to studying metabolic syndrome and related chronic conditions, their biological mechanisms and modifiable risk factors, and the best interventions to reduce or eliminate the burden of multiple chronic conditions in diverse, vulnerable adult populations.

Metabolic syndrome is a set of interrelated health conditions present in 35 percent of the US population that puts individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Common factors that comprise metabolic syndrome include hypertension, insulin resistance, and obesity. Genetics and the environment can play a role in metabolic syndrome and its related chronic conditions.

Precision health will be the focus of the Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations, which embraces a personalized approach to health by considering the factors unique to an individual and is emerging as a strategy for preventing and managing chronic diseases.

Jacquelyn Taylor, the Vernice D. Ferguson Chair of Health Equity at NYU Meyers and co-principal investigator for the Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations, tells NYU.edu, “The new center will extend nursing science by truly examining the uniqueness of individual and environmental level factors that influence health outcomes—including those related to genomics, biomarkers, lifestyle, and environmental factors—and can inform more individualized care for diverse populations at risk for multiple chronic conditions and/or resultant metabolic syndrome.”

To learn more about NYU Nursing’s $1.9 million grant to establish a new Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Oncology Nurse Jenni Chang Serves Those Who Served Our Country

Nurse of the Week: Oncology Nurse Jenni Chang Serves Those Who Served Our Country

Our Nurse of the Week is Jenni Chang, an oncology nurse who was honored by her patient Patrick Lewis for the care she showed him after being diagnosed with cancer. Lewis is a US veteran who served as a sergeant in the Marine Corps for three years. Being diagnosed with cancer made Lewis feel alone, like no one else could understand what he was going through, until he met nurse Chang.

After Lewis was admitted to the hospital for chemotherapy treatment for his sinonasal cancer diagnosis, Chang was assigned as his primary care nurse. She decided to share her own story to help him cope, telling him how she was inspired to become an oncology nurse after being diagnosed with leukemia at 16 years old. Her 28 weeks of chemo treatments made Chang want to dedicate her life to giving back to patients and their families.

In an essay about his experience battling cancer, Lewis described Chang with the following: “I have never seen someone so dedicated to caring for a specific patient population, veterans, whom she treats as if they are her own family members.”

It’s rare to find someone like you who can say they’ve been in your shoes and experienced a cancer diagnosis and treatment, but Chang is not like most nurses. She is using her difficult experience as a cancer patient and survivor to help inspire others.

To learn more about oncology nurse Jenni Chang and how she serves cancer patients, including veterans, visit here.

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing Pins Record-Breaking Number of Graduates

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing Pins Record-Breaking Number of Graduates

The Vanderbilt University School of Nursing celebrated the pinning of the largest number of students in the school’s 108-year history on Sunday, August 5. A total of 370 graduates were comprised of 276 Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) students, 12 Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) students, and 11 advanced practice nurses who received Post-Master’s Certificates. An additional 71 students were unable to attend the ceremonies.

Pinning ceremonies are a treasured tradition in nursing and each nursing school has its own distinctive pin to identify its graduates. According to Vanderbilt Nursing Dean Linda D. Norman, DSN, FAAN, and Valere Potter Menefee Professor in Nursing, pinning ceremonies can be traced back to the crusades with modern significance beginning with Florence Nightingale who presented medals of excellence to her nursing graduates.

MSN students received the VUSN pin signifying their entrance to the advanced practice nursing profession, DNP students received lavaliers to attach to their nursing school pins, and post-master’s students received certificates denoting the completion of their specialty education beyond the master’s degree level.

Vanderbilt Nursing’s pinning ceremonies also awarded two students: Kristina Holmes with the Amy Frances Brown Prize for Excellence in Writing, and Anna Sizemore with the VUSN Alumni Association Award for Student Excellence in Service and Leadership to School and Community. Nine faculty members were also honored during the ceremonies with Sara K. Archer Awards for outstanding contributions to student learning.

To learn more about Vanderbilt Nursing’s pinning ceremonies for nursing graduates, visit here.

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