Baylor University School of Nursing Partners with Keypath Education to Expand Online Graduate Programs

Baylor University School of Nursing Partners with Keypath Education to Expand Online Graduate Programs

Baylor University’s Louise Herrington School of Nursing (LHSON) has announced a partnership with Keypath Education to advance graduate-level online programming, beginning with nursing education.

With data showing that nursing master’s degrees have grown 42 percent over the last five years and nurse practitioner degrees have grown by 75 percent, Baylor and Keypath’s partnership is intended to help meet market demand.

Keypath and Baylor will work together to optimize and expand the existing online Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Leadership and Innovation program. Their partnership will also help launch new Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs with tracks in Family Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Midwifery, and Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, which will be available fully online for the first time.

Shelley F. Conroy, EdD, MS, RN, CNE, dean of Baylor’s Louise Herrington School of Nursing, tells PRWeb.com, “With the experience and knowledge of Keypath propelling them forward, we expect these programs will reach new students, help them achieve greatness in their professions and help the School better fulfill its mission.”

Recruitment for the new online programs will launch in spring 2018 and classes will begin in fall 2018. Keypath will work as an extension of the university’s team, helping to attract and enroll the best students for each program through higher education marketing and recruitment. Keypath will also provide in-depth market research, program development, and capital investment.

To learn more about Baylor Nursing’s partnership with Keypath Education to expand their online graduate program offerings, visit here.

University of Wisconsin-Madison Nursing Professor Inducted to Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame

University of Wisconsin-Madison Nursing Professor Inducted to Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame

Dr. Barbara J. Bowers, PhD, RN, FAAN, associate dean for research and sponsored programs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing, has been selected by the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing for induction to the Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame in recognition of her contributions to nursing science.

The International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame was created in 2010 to recognize nurse researchers who have achieved significant recognition and whose research has improved the profession and the people it serves. Bowers is one of 20 individuals from around the world to be inducted into the Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame this year. Those selected will be formally inducted at the Sigma International Nursing Research Congress in Melbourne, Australia, this July.

Bowers is known internationally for her contributions to the science and practice of nursing in the care of older adults, especially those in long-term care or residential settings. Her research career spans three decades, making Bowers renowned for her influence on gerontological science, healthcare policy, and research methodology. Bowers also founded and now directs the Center for Aging Research and Education which is housed in the School of Nursing and helps put aging research into action in communities throughout Wisconsin and beyond.

Nursing School Dean Dr. Linda D. Scott tells News.Wisc.edu, “Dr. Bowers has made a significant impact on the science of nursing, the study of gerontology, and the UW-Madison School of Nursing. Her vast body of work reflects her lifelong commitment to improving the lives of older adults and their caregivers, and she has inspired countless others to focus their careers not only on addressing the needs of the aging but also on changing the way society perceives older adults and the people who support them.”

To learn more about Bowers and her influential career in nursing research, visit here.

The Joint Commission Issues Alert on Violence against Health Care Workers

The Joint Commission Issues Alert on Violence against Health Care Workers

In recognition of Workplace Violence Awareness Month, The Joint Commission has issued an alert on violence against health care workers. According to the Security Industry Association, health care workers are four times more likely to be victimized, including physical and verbal violence, than workers in a private industry.

The Sentinel Event Alert is intended to help health care workers in hospitals and other health care settings recognize violence from patients and visitors, and become prepared to handle it and then affectively address it after the event.

Contributing factors associated with perpetrators of violence in health care were identified in the alert, including: altered mental status or mental illness, patients in police custody, long wait times or crowding, being given bad news about a diagnosis, gang activity, domestic disputes, and presence of firearms or other weapons.

The Joint Commission provides seven suggested actions to help address these contributing factors:

  • Clearly define workplace violence and put systems in place across the organization that enable staff to report workplace violence instances, including verbal abuse.
  • Recognizing that data come from several sources, capture, track and trend all reports of workplace violence—including verbal abuse and attempted assaults when no harm occurred, but in which the health worker feels unsafe.
  • Provide appropriate follow-up and support to victims, witnesses and others affected by workplace violence, including psychological counseling and trauma-informed care if necessary.
  • Review each case of workplace violence to determine contributing factors. Analyze data related to workplace violence, and worksite conditions, to determine priority situations for interventions.
  • Develop quality improvement initiatives to reduce incidents of workplace violence.
  • Train all staff, including security, in de-escalation, self-defense and response to emergency codes.
  • Evaluate workplace violence reduction initiatives.

Workplace violence in the healthcare setting should be immediately reported to leadership, internal security, and to law enforcement as needed. Proper reporting can help health care organizations analyze what happened and inform actions that need to be taken to minimize risk in the future.

To read The Joint Commission’s full Sentinel Event Alert, visit here.

University of Arkansas Nursing School Conducts Study on Generations

University of Arkansas Nursing School Conducts Study on Generations

University of Arkansas (U of A) students and faculty recently presented research at the 27th Annual Nursing Excellence in Research and Practice conference on April 2 where one research team received incentive to continue their project studying generations.

Peggy Lee, U of A clinical assistant professor, is leading the team investigating “The Changing Face in the Workplace: The Arrivals of the Millennials.” The team received $750 to assist with their project which will survey students at four higher-education institutions and compare responses from traditional college-age students in bachelor’s degree programs to responses from older, more experienced students in bachelor’s degree completion programs for registered nurses.

The team has created three surveys that will measure job satisfaction, organizational commitment like values and priorities, and personality traits. The three sections are combined into a 60-item questionnaire that students will complete online. They believe the data will help educators better prepare nurses for a diverse workforce made up of nurses from several generations.

Lee tells News.UArk.edu, “Research has shown that, by 2020, 75 percent of the workforce will be millennials. That’s very different from what we’ve had before in the workforce when the largest generation was baby boomers…The baby boomers, who are older nurses and administrators, have a lot of wisdom, but they have different ways of learning and communicating than the younger generations. Millennials say work-life balance is very important to them.”

The survey is being distributed to find out how the two groups are alike and how they are different, and whether they fit into the stereotypes typically assigned to generations. The information will help nursing schools and educators emphasize strengths from each generation to help generations understand each other and create a healthier work environment.

U of A’s research team will present the survey results at Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing’s meeting in Indianapolis this September. To learn more about U of A Nursing’s study on generations, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Nurse Anesthetist Sarah Sellers Takes Second Place in 2018 Boston Marathon

Nurse of the Week: Nurse Anesthetist Sarah Sellers Takes Second Place in 2018 Boston Marathon

Our Nurse of the Week is Sarah Sellers, a 26-year-old nurse anesthetist at Banner Health Center in Tucson, Arizona who became the runner-up in Monday’s 2018 Boston Marathon. Sellers quickly caught the attention of spectators who wondered who the runner-up was after she finished just four minutes behind Desiree Linden, the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon in 33 years.

“I think my story probably resonates with a lot of people that work really hard and have big goals. I think it’s cool to show that sometimes, you can have a great day and things can pay off.”

Sellers had no idea she had placed second in the annual marathon until after she had crossed the finish line, a feat that hadn’t seemed possible prior to the race. The Boston Marathon was only the second marathon Sellers had ever run, the first being the Huntsville Marathon in Utah which she ran in September as a qualifier for Boston and won, but Sellers is a past endurance runner who ran well in college before being sidelined by an injury.

Training for the marathon required Sellers to run before and after 10-hour shifts as a full-time nurse. She tells the Boston Globe, “I didn’t even know it was a possibility. I was trying to ask officials what place I was in. I had no idea when I crossed the finish line.” Sellers then found herself waking up Tuesday morning to a packed schedule of news conferences and photo shoots to attend before her afternoon flight back to Tucson to make it to work Wednesday morning.

Many have asked if Sellers plans to leave her job to pursue running full-time but Sellers loves her work as a nurse anesthetist and has no intentions of giving it up for right now. When asked the same question by the Boston Globe, Sellers responded: “I think my story probably resonates with a lot of people that work really hard and have big goals. I think it’s cool to show that sometimes, you can have a great day and things can pay off.”

To learn more about nurse anesthetist Sarah Sellers, the shocking runner-up in Monday’s 2018 Boston Marathon, visit here.

New University of Arizona Program Aims to Diversify Arizona’s Nursing Workforce

New University of Arizona Program Aims to Diversify Arizona’s Nursing Workforce

The University of Arizona has launched a new program focused on diversifying Arizona’s nursing workforce. The new program, the Arizona Nursing Inclusive Excellence (ANIE) scholars project, is designed to improve diversity in Arizona’s nursing workforce to help better patients’ healthcare experiences.

Diversity is lacking in a variety of occupations across the country, especially healthcare. In Arizona, 61 percent of the nursing workforce in 2017 was made up of white nurses according to Arizona State University’s Center for Health Information and Research.

Studies show patients are more likely to trust their caretaker when they feel they understand them and where they come from. A more diverse nursing workforce can also reduce communication barriers that can lead to serious errors.

With $1.9 million in funding, the new program is designed to support students from underrepresented backgrounds, specifically Native American students, Hispanic students, students from rural areas, and first-generation college students. With the nation’s third largest population of Native Americans and a Hispanic population of nearly 31 percent, Arizona is well suited to implement the ANIE program.

In addition to academic support, the ANIE program is connecting students with mentors from similar backgrounds. Just like patients like to see themselves in their nurses, students like to see themselves reflected in their professors and advisers.

The ANIE program is projected to support 158 students over a span of four years, helping Arizona work toward a more diverse nursing workforce. To learn more about the program initiatives, visit here.

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