Nurse of the Week: Penn State Nursing Dean Laurie Badzek Honored with National Leadership in Ethics Award

Nurse of the Week: Penn State Nursing Dean Laurie Badzek Honored with National Leadership in Ethics Award

Our Nurse of the Week is Laurie Badzek, LLM, JD, MS, RN, FNAP, FAAN, dean of the College of Nursing at Penn State, who has been honored with the American Nurses Association’s (ANA) Leadership in Ethics Award. ANA created the award to recognize registered nurses who have authentically demonstrated the highest standards of ethics and leadership in their daily practice, served as an ethical role model, and promoted ethical dialogue and scholarship.

Throughout her career, Badzek has held the roles of nurse, attorney, researcher, and educator. She brings experience in genomics, health care ethics and law, nursing practice, and end-of-life care and decision-making to her work, and her commitment to ethical leadership led her to serve as director of the American Nurses Association Center for Ethics and Human Rights where she was instrumental in revising the ANA Code of Ethics for Nurses.

Nick Jones, executive vice president and provost, tells news.psu.edu, “In 2018, we selected Laurie to be dean of Penn State’s College of Nursing in part because of her exemplary leadership on ethical and human rights issues and advocacy regarding nursing education, practice and policy. I consider Laurie a role model for ethical leadership at the University, so I’m thrilled that she received this much-deserved award from the ANA. I congratulate and thank Laurie for her commitment to excellence.”

Badzek began her role as dean of the Penn State College of Nursing in July 2018 where she oversees the undergraduate and graduate programs at 12 commonwealth campuses and online. Her role also enables her to be a champion of using genomics in nursing to enhance patient care, and her research in genomics has been funded by the National Council of the State Boards of Nursing, National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, and National Cancer Institute. Badzek is also a member of the American Association of College of Nursing Deans and Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, and a fellow of the National Academies of Practice and more.  

To learn more about Laurie Badzek, dean of the College of Nursing at Penn State, who has been honored with the American Nurses Association’s Leadership in Ethics Award, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Nursing Instructor Dana Lopes Overcomes Poverty in Rural Indiana to Become First Graduate in Family

Nurse of the Week: Nursing Instructor Dana Lopes Overcomes Poverty in Rural Indiana to Become First Graduate in Family

Our Nurse of the Week is Dana Lopes, a nursing instructor at the College of Saint Elizabeth who overcame growing up in poverty in rural Indiana and became the first high school graduate in her family before continuing on to nursing school.

Lopes was born in rural Indiana and raised in a trailer with no heat, no air conditioning, and barely enough beds for her family. Yet she became the first in her family to graduate from high school. She is now a nursing instructor and staff member at the College of Saint Elizabeth in Morris Township.

Lopes tells morristowngreen.com, “There was a time I had to sleep on plywood with just a blanket on it. I would always hear murmurings about my family and how I was never going to amount to anything….I want to be the role model for my students that I had when I was in school, because maybe I’m the only one they have in their life.”

Even though the odds were against her in a family who lived more than 15 percent below the poverty level, Lopes decided her life was going to be different from the way she grew up. A tumultuous upbringing with exposure to her father’s incarceration, domestic violence and substance abuse at home, ultimately inspired Lopes to pursue her education.

Realizing in middle school that an education was the only way out of her situation, Lopes joined every club and sport she could to keep herself away from home, and when she was at home, she locked herself away in her room in the trailer to read her textbooks until she fell asleep.

Eventually Lopes’ teachers became her role models and with their guidance Lopes earned admission to Purdue University with a fully paid scholarship. She has since earned several post-graduate certificates and nursing degrees. Now she wants her students to know that they have the power to fight for what they want and create their own opportunities.

To learn more about Dana Lopes, a nursing instructor at the College of Saint Elizabeth who overcame growing up in poverty and became the first high school graduate in her family before continuing on to nursing school, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Stanley Stinson Pursues Nursing Career Inspired by Past as a Young Homeless Man

Nurse of the Week: Stanley Stinson Pursues Nursing Career Inspired by Past as a Young Homeless Man

Our Nurse of the Week is Stanley Stinson, a recent nursing graduate of Concordia University who has allowed his past experience as a young homeless man inspire him to help the homeless, disabled, mentally ill, and drug-addicted. For Stinson, these issues are personal, and he believes everyone is deserving of help.

Stinson works closely with his outreach partner, Jeff Hunt. The duo have been working together for years to tend to those who need help the most, but Hunt admits that Stinson has been the driving force behind the effort.

Kevin White, a disabled client of Stinson’s, tells fox2detroit.com, “[Stinson] has a big heart for the people on the street and what they’re going through. He went to nursing school so he could better help them.”

Stinson and his outreach team from Covenant Community Care tend to all kinds of medical needs at a warming center at St. Peter and Paul Church in Detroit. They offer everything from dental care to foot care. Foot care may seem odd to some, but Stinson knows the importance of tending to the feet.

Stinson says, “We’re all walking through this life trying to make it…Jesus washed feet, so I think it’s very special to wash people’s feet and take care of their feet. It’s also their mode of transportation so if anything goes wrong with their feet it’s like something going wrong with our vehicle.”

The outreach program goes beyond warming centers and community clinics; Stinson and his team also hit the streets overnight to try to help prostitutes, victims of human trafficking, and anyone else in need. He won’t allow the dark or fear of scary places to let people in need of help be forgotten. He offers medical care on the streets, as well as hands out boots, socks, blankets, and more to anyone who needs them.

Now that he’s graduated, Stinson hopes he can spend even more time on the streets helping the most vulnerable populations. He says his experiences have been humbling and he considers it an honor to help those in need. To learn more about Stanley Stinson, a recent nursing graduate of Concordia University who has allowed his past experience as a young homeless man inspire him to help the homeless, disabled, mentally ill, and drug-addicted, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Cassie Dietrick, Mother of Two, Overcomes Deployment to Afghanistan While Working Toward Nursing Degree

Nurse of the Week: Cassie Dietrick, Mother of Two, Overcomes Deployment to Afghanistan While Working Toward Nursing Degree

Our Nurse of the Week is Cassie Dietrick, a mother of two who worked two jobs and overcame a deployment to Afghanistan, but never stopped working toward a nursing degree from the University of Wisconsin–Madison (UW-Madison).

Dietrick completed her nursing education almost entirely online and through clinicals at an area hospital, but very rarely stepped foot on campus. The flexibility of UW-Madison’s online nursing program was integral to her success. When Dietrich started nursing school, she had an associate’s nursing degree and a full-time job at St. Mary’s Hospital, plus a part-time job with the Wisconsin Air National Guard, with two young children to take care of at home. 

While most students take two and a half years to complete the program, Dietrick completed the program in one, even though she spent four of those months serving in Afghanistan. Dietrick was halfway through the nursing program at UW-Madison when the Guard called on her to deploy to Afghanistan. At the time, her youngest child wasn’t even one year old yet and she feared that a poor internet connection overseas might delay her studies and self-imposed deadline to graduate. 

Dietrick tells madison.com, “I kind of overextended myself, but feel like I do better when my plate is full.”

During her time overseas, Dietrick made a video call home to her kids at the end of each of her shifts, and then threw herself into her coursework, finishing five classes before returning home. She says she wanted to get as much done as possible so that she could spend time with her family when she came home. When her deployment was extended from three months to four, Dietrick still had 60 required hours of clinical observation that were unmet and she would only be weeks from graduation when returning home in November. Thankfully her mentor was willing to pick up extra shifts so that Dietrick could shadow her to get the hours she needed to complete her degree. 

Despite all of her setbacks and challenges, Dietrick managed to finish her clinical hours and walk across the stage this past December with her bachelor’s degree in nursing from UW-Madison. To learn more about Cassie Dietrick, a mother of two who worked two jobs and overcame a deployment to Afghanistan, but never stopped working toward her nursing degree, visit here

Nurse of the Week: Nursing Student Bethany Moore Designs College Experience to Serve Those Close to Home

Nurse of the Week: Nursing Student Bethany Moore Designs College Experience to Serve Those Close to Home

Our Nurse of the Week is Bethany Moore, a senior nursing student in the School of Nursing and Allied Health (SONAH) at Western Kentucky University (WKU), who has designed her college experience to allow her to receive her nursing degree while serving those closer to home. Her home is just across the border in Hendersonville, Tennessee, and she hopes to return there to work as a registered nurse after graduation.

Moore tells wku.edu, “The number one reason I chose WKU was because of the nursing program. They are well known for preparing their students for a successful career, and WKU was close enough to my hometown, without being too close.”

WKU’s nursing curriculum allows students to participate in simulations that imitate real-life situations and allow students to apply their classroom knowledge and build their skills. It also leaves room for error, allowing students to problem solve and make educated decisions for their patient in a simulated environment.

Moore currently works in a hospital as a nursing intern and has already applied her knowledge to real-life situations. She had a patient who had developed acute respiratory distress syndrome and had just completed a simulation with the same scenario a week before. Applying the knowledge and skills she gained in the simulation setting, Moore felt confident in contributing to the care of her patient in the real-world setting.

Moore hopes to continue her education in the future, to work toward a specialization in neonatal and pediatric care. To learn more about WKU senior nursing student Bethany Moore who designed her college experience to allow her to receive her nursing degree while serving those closer to home, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: US Marine Veteran Tori Levine Aims to Become Nurse Anesthetist for Doctors Without Borders

Nurse of the Week: US Marine Veteran Tori Levine Aims to Become Nurse Anesthetist for Doctors Without Borders

Our Nurse of the Week is Tori Levine, 22, a US Marine veteran and current nursing student at Stony Brook University who wants to become a nurse anesthetist for Doctors Without Borders.

Levine is from Dix Hills, NY, and says she knew she wanted to enlist in the military when she was nine years old. When her senior year in high school rolled around, Levine decided to defer college to enroll in the Marine Corps. She soon found herself serving as a collateral duty inspector for combat jets while deployed to the Middle East.

Levine tells news.stonybrook.edu, “I had trouble sleeping thinking about the maintenance I oversaw and imagining the worst possible cases: ‘What if something wasn’t connected right? What if the wire we repaired doesn’t hold? What if someone gets hurt? Did I make sure all of the tools were accounted for?’ With time I was able to gain confidence in myself and quit second-guessing when I know I had triple-checked it multiple times.”

Her military training eventually taught her discipline and provided her with mental jet fuel: “Being a nurse also appealed to me but I never thought I could do that because I struggled in the sciences. The military made me realize that what they say about mind over matter is true. I know now I can do it.”

After finishing her undergraduate degree, Levine eventually wants to become a nurse anesthetist and work for Doctors Without Borders. She feels she is aptly equipped to provide care and training to victims of war in the Middle East once she’s received the proper nursing training. She’s also trying to learn Russian and French, the two languages required to be accepted into Doctors Without Borders.

To learn more about Tori Levine, a US Marine veteran and current nursing student at Stony Brook University who wants to become a nurse anesthetist for Doctors Without Borders, visit here.

Listen to the Chapter Podcasts for Jonas and Kovner's Health Care Delivery in the United States


Gain a better understanding of the current state of the US health care system and how it might impact your work and life.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Join the editors of Evidence-Based Physical Examination: Best Practices for Health and Well-Being Assessment—Kate Sustersic Gawlik, Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, and Alice M. Teall—to learn how an evidence-based approach lays the groundwork for the integration of wellness, health promotion, and disease prevention, ensuring patient safety and high-quality cost-effective care.

REGISTER NOW

You have Successfully Subscribed!