University of Virginia School of Nursing Honored for Diversity

University of Virginia School of Nursing Honored for Diversity

The University of Virginia (UVA) School of Nursing recently received a Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, which covers diversity in higher education. This was the first time UVA’s nursing school has been honored and they were among 35 health professions schools nationwide to receive a  2018 HEED Award.

Lenore Pearlstein, INSIGHT Into Diversity’s publisher, tells News.Virginia.edu, “The Health Professions HEED Award process consists of a comprehensive and rigorous application that includes questions relating to the recruitment and retention of students and employees – and best practices for both; continued leadership support for diversity; and other aspects of campus diversity and inclusion.”

Since establishing an initiative on Diversity, Inclusion, and Excellence Achievement (IDEA) in 2014, UVA’s nursing school has shifted its recruitment, admissions, and retention strategies to welcome more underrepresented and first-generation applicants, established affinity groups for students of color, initiated expansive diversity training for faculty and staff, and urged professors to incorporate diverse perspectives and inclusive content into their courses.

UVA nursing faculty and graduate teaching assistants attend trainings across a variety of diversity-related topics, and all nursing students take part in cultural humility training and a plethora of regular activities to drive the school’s message of inclusivity. In 2018, nearly a third of enrolled students are from groups underrepresented in nursing, and more than 17 percent are male.

To learn more about UVA Nursing’s Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, visit here.

Nursing Leadership in Wound Care

Nursing Leadership in Wound Care

Do you love patient care but long for some autonomy in your nursing practice? Perhaps a leadership position in wound care nursing is the answer. Wounds are often the domain of one or more wound care nurses, as they are especially problematic for nursing departments, particularly those acquired during a hospital or facility stay. A wound care coordinator supervises these nurses, providing organizational leadership and management.

What Additional Certifications Are Required?

Wound care nurses focus solely on prevention and healing. The coordinator holds specific certifications in wound, skin, and ostomy care and is responsible for supervision of the wound care nurses. Wound care nurses may also have advanced certifications in this area, but their task is solely the everyday management, assessment, and treatment of wounds as ordered by the physician.

Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse (WOCN) certification is the highest available to registered nurses. It is obtained through the Wound Ostomy Continence Nurses Society, which requires completion of a formal WOC program. These require a bachelor’s degree or higher, at least one year of clinical experience following RN licensure, and clinical experience within five years of beginning the WOC program.

The Certified Wound Specialist (CWS) certification is sponsored by the American Board of Wound Management and is available to Registered Nurses and several other non-nursing health professions. Certification requires that the candidate have a bachelor’s degree and three years’ experience in wound care, or completion of at least a year-long fellowship that has been certified with a credentialing organization.

The National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy offers the Wound Care Certification (WCC) to RNs and LPN/LVNs, as well as NPs and other allied health professions with an active unrestricted license. This certification requires completion of an education course that meets the Alliances criteria but does not specifically require a bachelor’s degree.

What Are the Responsibilities of a Wound Care Coordinator?

Wound care coordinators evaluate the success of treatment modalities, discuss nutritional needs with dieticians, and consult with medical directors, physicians, and plastic surgeons on healing progression and complications. Wound care coordinators develop and implement programs that focus specifically on skin and wound care. They also conduct interdisciplinary rounds with other departments whose areas of expertise intersect and potentially affect the patient’s potential for wound healing. Wound care coordinators and nurses usually meet regularly with the administration and nursing to update on the status of wounds as well.

How Do Patients Benefit?

Wound care nurses and the coordinators who manage them elevate the level of care for wounds by making that their sole focus. Without the full responsibility for a patient’s overall primary care, wound care nurses and coordinators are better able to focus on bringing their patient to an optimum state to facilitate healing. That’s a win for the facility, the physicians, the nursing department, and especially the patient.

Learn more about wound care nursing here.

Nurses’ Attitudes Key To Infection Control

Nurses’ Attitudes Key To Infection Control

Changing perceptions of risk could improve compliance with infection-control measures

It’s often said that knowledge is power. But a new study finds that when it comes to nurses’ compliance with infection-control measures, it’s more appropriate to say attitude is everything.

The study, published in the American Journal of Infection Control, examines the relationship between infection-control compliance, knowledge, and attitude among home healthcare nurses. Researchers surveyed 359 home healthcare nurses in the U.S., and evaluated their knowledge of best practices in relation to their compliance with infection-control measures.

Over 90% of nurses self-reported compliance for most of the measured behaviors. The researchers also found there was not a direct correlation between knowledge of infection-control practices and compliance with those practices. However, there was a relationship between the level of compliance and the participants’ favorable attitude toward infection control.

“This study tells us that knowledge is not enough,” said one of the lead authors, Jingjing Shang, PhD, of Columbia University School of Nursing in New York City. “Our efforts to improve compliance need to focus on ways to alter nurses’ attitudes and perceptions about infection risk.”

Common Hurdles

The authors suggest that efforts to improve compliance with infection-control practices should focus on strategies to alter perceptions about infection risk. Changes should start on an organizational level, and seek to create a culture of positivity in relation to infection-control compliance.

Among other takeaways from the study:

  • Protective equipment lapses: While most of the participants reported compliance on most issues, many reported lapses when it came to wearing protective equipment; only 9% said they wear disposable face masks when there is a possibility of a splash or splatter, and 6% said they wear goggles or eye shields when there is a possibility of exposure to bloody discharge or fluid
  • A culture of “presenteeism:” Presenteeism, coming into work despite being sick, has become a patient safety issue over the last few years, especially as it relates to infection control; only 4% of participants felt it was easy for them to stay at home when they were sick, which could be a major contributor to rates of infection
  • Hand hygiene is still an issue: 30% of respondents failed to identify that hand hygiene should be performed after touching a nursing bag, which could transport infectious pathogens as nurses travel between patients

“Infection is a leading cause of hospitalization among home healthcare patients, and nurses have a key role in reducing infection by compliance with infection-control procedures in the home care setting,” Shang said.

This story was originally posted on MedPage Today. 

Hunting the Elusive Work-Life Balance in Nursing

Hunting the Elusive Work-Life Balance in Nursing

Work-life balance is a hot concept in the nursing profession. We hear we need it. We want to achieve it. But does it really exist?

That question has piqued the interest of Adele A. Webb, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN, senior academic director of workforce solutions at Capella University in Minneapolis.

“People think they need it,” she said. “But do they? Can you ever have it? Or are people chronically dissatisfied because it’s like a unicorn … they’re chasing something that doesn’t exist.”

Balance Vs Satisfaction

Webb plans to study and delve into the concept of work-life balance and nurses. She said recent conversations with nurse executives, including those at HealthLeaders Media 2017 CNO Exchange, left her realizing that the idea needs to be better defined.

“Years ago, I read an article called Balance is Bunk!, and [the point] was you never have 50% this and 50% that. Sometimes work takes more, sometimes family takes more,” she recalled.

For example, if a nurse must take off from work to stay home with a sick child, on that day, family needs more focus than work. And there are times, especially for those who work weekends or holidays, where work will eclipse family.

Still, Webb said she understands the desire behind the idea of work-life balance.

“What does work-life balance really mean? It means you’re happy. Well, what does happy mean? Happy means you’re satisfied with what you’re doing,” she said. “I think what people really want is life satisfaction. They can be satisfied at home and satisfied at work even if it’s not balanced.”

Generational Differences

Another question Webb said she is pondering is, “How then do we address or encourage satisfaction and what does that mean?”

She said she has noticed, even among her own family, that different generations of nurses crave different things.

“I have a daughter and a granddaughter who are nurses. My granddaughter is definitely a Millennial. She’s 24, new in her career, and what she wants is opportunity,” Webb said. “She’s always reading, trying to better her skills, and to learn something new.”

This drive to further their skills and their careers is a trait often tied to the Millennial generation. However, it can also be a factor that contributes to their workplace turnover. According to the RN Work Project, almost 18% of newly licensed RNs leave their first employer within the first year.

“We have the job to educate these younger nurses on opportunities to find satisfaction in the job they’re in. So when you want more, you can sign up for a committee. You can look at policy in your community or state. There are opportunities outside of leaving your unit that can meet your needs,” Webb said.

“How exciting it would be for a young nurse to have the opportunity to be on the quality committee at a hospital. Or to have the opportunity to contribute to care algorithms or standards or care or policies?” she added. “They would learn [so much] from it [and] they could contribute so much.”

While baby boomers are more likely to stay in their positions, they, too, have a need for life satisfaction and often value time and self-fulfillment, said Webb.

For example, offering tuition assistance to pursue a master’s degree may give this generation a sense of satisfaction. Or they may find fulfillment in sharing the knowledge they’ve garnered over their years of experience.

“[Give them] the opportunity to be involved, and be on a budget committee at the hospital and understand the finances and the contributions they make,” Webb suggested. “Train them to be preceptors. Let them share that knowledge with the younger generation.”

What’s Next?

Webb is in the early stages of reviewing published literature for existing information on work-life balance and satisfaction, and plans to interview nurses about their insights. Once she has a working thesis, she plans to connect with nursing professionals through presentations and conferences to see whether her definition and evaluation of work-life balance or work-life satisfaction rings true.

This story was originally posted on MedPage Today. 

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Awarded INSIGHT Into Diversity Higher Education Health Professions Award

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Awarded INSIGHT Into Diversity Higher Education Health Professions Award

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON) has received the 2018 INSIGHT Into Diversity Higher Education “Excellence in Diversity” Health Professions award for its committed efforts to support and sustain diversity and inclusion through education, programs, and outreach. The award is a national honor recognizing individual health institutions showing outstanding achievement in making diversity a top priority.

Diversity, equity, and inclusion are embedded into the strategic plan and overall mission at JHSON. Faculty, students, and staff are provided opportunities for collective cultural exchanges and experiences through encouragement from leadership and the school’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee. Efforts to promote respect for differing views and backgrounds are weaved into curriculum development, scholarships, recruitment, partnerships, and strategy.

Gloria Ramsey, JD, RN, FNAP, FAAN, who was appointed to serve as inaugural associate dean for diversity, equity, and inclusion to further the school’s diversity and its impact on innovation, education, practice, research, and service, tells Newswise.com:

“Our commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion is clearly evident and well integrated into the operations of the school. Our entire community should feel proud and honored to receive the HEED Award because it represents a collective effort and underscores our values and commitment to inclusive excellence for 21st century nursing. As we celebrate the progress we have made, we continue to hold ourselves accountable to continue important work, be open to new ideas, and think forward toward creating a more diverse and inclusive environment in the future.” 

JHSON also focuses on advancing social justice in the community, cultural competence education, and minority awareness celebrations. Currently, 25% of faculty and 37% of students are from racial and ethnic minorities.

To learn more about the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing receiving the INSIGHT Into Diversity Higher Education “Excellence in Diversity” Health Professions award, visit here.

Frontier Nursing University Awarded 2018 Health Professions HEED Award

Frontier Nursing University Awarded 2018 Health Professions HEED Award

Frontier Nursing University (FNU) was recently awarded the 2018 Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine is the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education, and the HEED Award is a national honor recognizing US medical, dental, pharmacy, osteopathic, nursing, veterinary, allied health, and other health schools and centers that demonstrate outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion.

FNU President Dr. Susan Stone tells Frontier.edu, “We are deeply honored to receive the prestigious HEED Award. We believe in the benefits of a diverse university and in the positive impacts our diverse graduates can make in communities across the country. Our graduates serve people of all races and cultures and are increasingly coming from diverse backgrounds. It is imperative that our students, faculty and staff have cultural awareness and competency in order to effectively advance our mission of servant leadership. We have demonstrated our ongoing commitment to diversity by implementing programs and structure to ensure we reach our goals. The HEED Award is a validation of those efforts and provides additional inspiration to maintain our commitment to achieving and exceeding our diversity and inclusion goals.”

FNU will be featured in the December 2018 issue of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine along with 34 other higher education institutions. FNU was awarded for the implementation of its FNU PRIDE Initiative (Promoting Recruitment and Retention to Increase Diversity in Nurse-Midwifery and Nurse Practitioner Education) in 2010 which spearheaded targeted recruitment activities and increased student of color enrollment from 9% in 2010 to 23% in 2018.

The university has also held three annual Diversity Impact Student Conferences to ensure that nurse practitioners and nurse midwives understand the challenges and opportunities offered by diversity in rural and underserved healthcare systems. To further demonstrate ongoing commitment to diversity and inclusion, FNU created a Chief Diversity Inclusion Officer (CDIO) position in 2017 and appointed Dr. Maria Valentin-Welch to that office.

To learn more about Frontier Nursing University being awarded the 2018 Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, visit here.

Get the 2018 Nurse Salary Report

See how nursing salaries compare across the United States by career paths, specialties, ethnicity, and more.

DOWNLOAD NOW

You have Successfully Subscribed!


Gain a better understanding of the current state of the US health care system and how it might impact your work and life.

You have Successfully Subscribed!