Want to Be a Psychiatric Nurse at VHA? Five Groups You’ll Make an Impact On

Want to Be a Psychiatric Nurse at VHA? Five Groups You’ll Make an Impact On

You entered the field of psychiatric nursing because you wanted to make a difference in the lives of patients. As a psychiatric nurse with VHA, you’ll do that and more. Not only will you play a critical role in changing the lives of Veterans, often in the most challenging stage of their life, but you’ll work with their network of family and friends to provide whole healing and a successful outcome. Learn more about the specific Veteran populations you’ll be working with and the opportunities for making an impact.

1. The families of Veterans

VA offers a range of family services for Veterans and their family members, including family education, brief problem-focused consultation, family psychoeducation, and marriage and family counseling. Our psychiatric nurses play an integral part in facilitating these services, working with all members of the family to provide holistic solutions.

2. Homeless Veterans

VA is the only Federal agency that provides substantial hands-on assistance directly to homeless Veterans. As a VHA psychiatric nurse, you’ll have the unique opportunity to step outside the hospital walls and treat Veterans who would not otherwise seek help. Additional VA assistance programs where you can make an impact include:

  • Drop-in centers where Veterans who are homeless can shower, get a meal, and get help with a job or getting back into society
  • Transitional housing in community-based programs
  • Long-term assistance, case management and rehabilitation

3. Veterans with Serious Mental Illness

Veterans diagnosed with Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder and Bipolar Disorder work with VHA psychiatric nurses on a variety of treatment plans, including psychosocial rehabilitation and recovery services to optimize functioning. In addition, you’ll be a part of our Mental Health Intensive Case Management team. The team of mental health physicians, nurses, psychologists and social workers helps Veterans experiencing symptoms of severe mental illness cope with their symptoms and live more successfully at home and in the community.

4. Veterans adjusting to civilian life

The transition process from military to civilian life is a challenging one, and our psychiatric nurses are there from the beginning to provide crucial support. At our 300 community-based Vet Centers, our staff provides adjustment counseling and outreach services to all Veterans who served in any combat zone. Services are also available for family members for military-related issues, and bereavement counseling is offered for parents, spouses and children of Armed Forces, National Guard and Reserve personnel who died in the service of their country.

5. Older Veterans

To provide specialized care for our older Veterans, we’ve developed VA Community Living Centers (CLCs). Here, you will treat older Veterans needing temporary assisted care until they can return home or find placement in a nursing home. Our staff also works on ensuring that Veterans can safely live independently by screening for dementia and general assessments that help us decide whether the Veteran can make informed medical decisions.

As a psychiatric nurse at VHA, the work you do will deeply affect the Veteran, their family and generations of families to come. View our Nursing positions or, Join VA in making a difference in one of the many other health care fields available.

This story was originally posted on VAntage Point.

Beyond the Hospital: 8 Non-Bedside Nursing Jobs

Beyond the Hospital: 8 Non-Bedside Nursing Jobs

The word “nurse” brings a very specific picture to mind for most of us. We picture someone in scrubs working in a hospital or a clinic, helping to treat patients at the bedside and making rounds. But the skill set developed through nursing opens up entire worlds beyond that traditional environment. Nursing jobs away from the bedside are challenging, rewarding and not at all what you’d expect. 

In this article, we’ll go over some non-bedside nursing jobs and what they entail. We’ll talk about the duties of those nurses, the environments in which they work, and in some cases, what they can expect to earn. If you’re looking to move your career into a more interesting phase, you might consider pursuing a non-traditional nursing career. 

8 Non-bedside Nursing Jobs

From summer camp programs to the NASCAR racetrack, some surprising places need medical professionals on hand. These career options could offer more work-life stability, travel opportunities or a shot of adrenaline. 

1. Cruise Ship Nurse

A nurse working in this role would help care for a cruise ship’s passengers and staff as part of the ship’s medical personnel. Depending on the size of the ship, the medical facilities could be quite state-of-the-art, rivaling an emergency room in a hospital on land. Cruise ship nurses work in the infirmary and report to the chief nurse. Working in this role requires at least two years of emergency care experience and an advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) certification. Working on a cruise ship brings these nurses into contact with people from all over the world, and of course, offers the opportunity to travel. Nursing staff on a cruise ship are divided into three distinct categories: chief nurse, nurse practitioner and staff nurse. Duties here are much the same as nursing on land, but a cruise ship nurse could accompany a patient if they must be evacuated from the ship to land. Tours of duty are six months long, with two months off afterward.

2. Camp Nurse

If you’re someone who prefers the outdoors and doesn’t like to stay in one place for very long, camp nursing could be for you. There are myriad camp organizations that employ camp nurses. There are camps for children diagnosed with cancer, adults with mental disabilities or camps that center around an activity like whitewater rafting or horseback riding. The Association of Camp Nurses (ACN) lists opportunities on their website, so you can browse through them and see which one most closely fits your background. Those with experience in emergency care or pediatrics would be well-suited, and an ability to make decisions independently is key, as camp nurses often work alone. According to PayScale, camp nurses can expect to earn between $22-$41 per hour. 

3. Correctional Nurse/Prison Nurse 

A nurse working in this role will often be the first person to see an inmate about a health complaint. A correctional nurse will assess the patient and determine the requirements of care the same as they would if they were working in a hospital. They conduct intake screenings, work in chronic care clinics to help inmates manage chronic conditions, keep track of medications so they aren’t misused and provide what’s known as “sick call” services. Sick call is when an inmate requests to see a nurse for a sudden issue, which can result in an appointment with a physician. This role could also offer the opportunity to become a coordinator for programs like prison hospice care, in which inmates are trained to take care of their peers during the final phase of their lives in incarceration.

4. Clinical Nurse Educator/RN Medical Device Educator 

This may be one of the more well-known non-bedside nursing careers, in which an experienced nursing professional opts to instruct others in the practices and techniques of the job. Nurse educators can work in a classroom setting in a university or nursing school, as well as in the field with nurses-in-training or with those who need a clinical education, such as people who work in insurance or public healthcare workers. Because being employed in this role often requires a bachelor’s or other advanced degree, nurse educators can train medical staff to instruct non-medical personnel in medical procedures and equipment. A very high satisfaction rate is reported with this job, and the median salary is just over $75,000 per year, according to PayScale. 

5. Nurse Writer/Medical Writer

A background in or passion for writing as well as experience in healthcare can be leveraged into a career as a nurse writer. Their job is to write up training materials, manuals and educational papers for their employers. Nurse writers usually work for a healthcare provider, pharmaceutical company, medical equipment company or something in a similar vein. They must be able to research well, express specialized information in a readable manner and conduct interviews, similar to the duties of a journalist. PayScale reported that job satisfaction rates for this role are also high, and the median salary is similar to that of a nurse educator at just over $70,000 per year.

6. NASCAR Nurse

NASCAR drivers are just as much athletes as players in the NBA or NFL are, and the sport is one of the most popular in North America. When a driver has a crash, medical staff need to be on site to help. NASCAR nurses do initial assessments of the pit crew and drivers after an accident occurs, but a large part of their work is looking after the fans. This role can involve travel as well, if you’re working as an official part of the NASCAR team and following the races as they move across the country. NASCAR nurses also act as liaisons between the team and local medical staff working an event, making sure the proper equipment is on hand to handle anything from dehydration to lacerations and blunt force trauma. 

7. Flight Nurse

Perhaps the most action-packed on this list of non-bedside nursing jobs, a flight nurse isn’t what you might think when reading the job title. Rather than working on an aircraft, flight nurse travel to remote locations not easily accessible to help the injured. They provide specialized, hospital-level care to their patients as they’re being airlifted to a medical facility. This can be at the scene of a major accident, between hospitals or in a remote wilderness location. Flight nurse Matt Tederman, in an interview with PBS, detailed the time he had to help a snowmobiler in the rural plains of Omaha with a neck laceration from barbed wire. Helping to bring that patient back, he says, was a reminder of why he does the job. This position requires a BSN and three to five years of experience working in the ER or intensive care unit (ICU).

8. Parish Nurse

Last on our list of non-bedside nursing jobs is the parish nurse. Parish nurses care for the members of a parish or religious congregation. They approach their work differently than the other people on this list as they integrate elements of faith into their work alongside medicine. Relatively new as nursing specialties go, it was only recognized as such in 1998. Parish nurses work mostly in churches, but you can also find them in hospitals or social service agencies, as many hospitals have chapel areas set aside for people to worship. If a hospital is faith-based, it’s more likely to employ parish nurses. The duties of a parish nurse include visiting patients, mentoring members of their religious community, acting as a patient advocate and starting support groups. Parish nurses are required to hold active RN licenses and have practiced as an RN for two years or more.

Want to Take the Next Step? 

If getting outside of the hospital sounds like the next step in your career, Fairleigh Dickinson University can help you get there. Our accredited RN to BSN online program trains working nurses to deliver comprehensive care to individuals and families in all environments so that you’ll have the skills necessary to become competitive in the job market. If you already have your BSN and are looking to advance your knowledge and care practices, consider our MSN nurse educator online program. We’ll prepare you to become an instructor in collegiate nursing programs. Through a state-of-the-art curriculum, you’ll acquire the training you need to effectively work with students, parents and patients.

This sponsored post is brought to you by Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Hospitals Capitalize on Employee Engagement for Maximum ROI

Hospitals Capitalize on Employee Engagement for Maximum ROI

While medical technology is booming, the art of caring is becoming a highly profitable field as well. By focusing on employee engagement, hospitals embrace the staff and the highly personable touch they have to offer. The healthcare workers are essential to improving HCAHPS scores and reducing hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) (source).

Employee Engagement versus Satisfaction

Employee engagement and employee satisfaction are miles apart. A nurse can be satisfied with a position, show up to every shift without complaint, and leave for a neighboring hospital that offers a seven minute shorter commute. Job satisfaction rewards the bare minimum of effort and reliability to the hospital. Employee engagement is the nurse’s dedication to working on behalf of the hospitals and patients.

Engagement Prevents Medical Errors

Nurse engagement requires more than showing up with a smile to do the job. It entails an emotional commitment to the company and its goals. A Gallup study showed that the most critical element in reducing medical errors is employee engagement. Engagement matters more than any other single factor including staffing.

How to Foster Employee Engagement

While employees welcome picnics and parties, the most important factors are recognition and feeling connected to nursing management. There is a significant positive link between a high-quality supervisor and nursing engagement. It is vital that nurse managers create an environment of appreciation, trust, and growth.

Employee engagement increases nurse retention and keeps costs down. It reduces medical errors, the transmission of HACs, and the hospital mortality rate. By believing in both the management and hospital, patients and nurses thrive.

 

 

California Future Health Workforce Commission Report Strategies to Address Nursing Shortage

California Future Health Workforce Commission Report Strategies to Address Nursing Shortage

In February, the California Future Health Workforce Commission issued their final report describing recommendations to maintain the workforce needed to meet healthcare demands for the present day and the future (source). The California Future Health Workforce Commission was established in 2017 “to help close the gap between the health workforce we have and the health workforce we need.” The commission includes senior leaders from philanthropies across the state (source). The plan develops critical strategies to address professional nurse recruitment.

The Burdens

While the document targets issues across California, the primary concerns are generalizable to the nation. Historically in the U.S., the supply of nurses has not kept pace with demand, predominantly in underserved communities. The impending nursing shortage and an aging population crisis impact communities nationally.

The Strategies

The following key strategies from the report translate well into tactics for professional recruitment.

  1. Increase opportunities to advance in the health professions allows professional development, advancement, and job progression. Increasing job satisfaction and salaries promote staff retention.
  2. Align and expand education and training by anticipating areas of deficits and coordinating community and healthcare stakeholders to encourage buy-in. To guarantee continuing improvement, recruiters must look at the shortage as a process instead of a resolved episode. Healthcare organizations and hospital systems have an essential role in addressing the crisis.
  3. Strengthen the capacity, retention, and effectiveness of nurses by identifying how to minimize burnout and maximize utilizing nurses efficiently.

 

The California Future Health Workforce Commission report gives recommendations that relate to professional nurse recruitment. By keeping nurses satisfied, promoting community involvement, and reducing burnout the healthcare systems can develop a three-prong approach to recruiting and maintaining a robust nursing staff.

Promoting Diversity Among Student Nurses Increases Retention

Promoting Diversity Among Student Nurses Increases Retention

While minority enrollment in nursing programs have nearly doubled in the last twenty years, nursing has a long way to go in appropriately representing minorities in the United States (source). The current enrollment data is insufficient to address the needs of a future diverse nursing workforce. It is imperative to advocate for minority nurses in both higher education and the profession.

Diversity in Professional Nursing

Increasing diversity among nurses is a core value of the profession. The National League for Nursing promotes diversity by endorsing a culture of inclusion and excellence by celebrating a diverse population of professionals. The American Nurses Association has a professional commitment to awareness of diversity issues and the individual nurse’s biases and perceptions. For the culmination of a diverse nursing workforce to take root, schools must aim to recruit, enroll, and retain minority nursing students.

Diversity Among Student Nurses

Modern nursing programs work to disseminate a curriculum that concentrates on how to address health disparities among ethnic minorities and others who face socioeconomic barriers. Early recruitment programs that value diversifying nursing education can bolster student retention and graduation (source).

The Diversity Impact Program

For example, Frontier Nursing University increases student recruitment and retention through the Diversity Impact Program. This program offers cultural awareness and support through a social network, activities, and events during the year to connect students, including a Diversity Impact conference.

By implementing a model where student nurses embrace and encourage cultural awareness, student retention and satisfaction improves. Creating an engaging model that embraces cultural diversity is imperative to minimize student attrition. When student nurses support each other, it enhances the outlook for the entire nursing profession.

Nursing Entrance Exams Impact Program Performance

Nursing Entrance Exams Impact Program Performance

Nursing entrance exams make or break a student’s chances for nursing school enrollment. By offering a challenging entrance exam, higher educational institutions screen initial applicants before admission. These tests assess the academic competencies and potential nursing capabilities of students. The chosen nursing entrance test varies by institution.

What is the best admission exam?

In 2015, a study statistically analyzed the pre-admission nursing exam results over five years to determine which tests predict success in an associate degree nursing program (source). The tests surveyed were the Pre-Admission Examination for Registered Nurses (National League of Nursing), the A2 admission assessment from Health Education Systems Inc. (HESI), and the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) from Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI). The analysis demonstrated that the HESI A2 examination scores correlated with success in the nursing program.

How many retakes is too many?

In 2018, studies addressed how nursing admissions should confront the issue where one student takes the entrance exam multiple times. The examinee scores higher with each attempt. The limitation of the study was that it only evaluated those students who scored high enough on the TEAS to be admitted to nursing school and completed the first semester. The results showed that the assurance of nursing success relates to the average of all test attempts. Admission for both ADN and BSN programs should depend on the mean of all score data. However, there must be a limit. Individuals who take the TEAS six or more times have significantly lower nursing performance than their peers (source).

Questions remain regarding the ideal entrance exam and the number of test retakes. It is time to establish a rigorous competency for nursing admissions that is expressly related to program data about student success.

Caitlin Goodwin MSN, RN, CNM is a Board Certified Nurse-Midwife and freelance writer. She has ten years of nursing experience and graduated with a MSN from Frontier Nursing University. 

 

 

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