New RN to BSN Online Program at University of Cincinnati College of Nursing

New RN to BSN Online Program at University of Cincinnati College of Nursing

The University of Cincinnati College of Nursing and UC Health have partnered together to launch a new program for nurses working full-time who want to further their education. The RN to BSN Online Cohort Program will provide free tuition to a select group of UC Health nurses, who will be able to obtain a BSN through the UC College of Nursing over 12 months.

“We’re excited to see our partnership with UC Health get broader and stronger every day,” UC College of Nursing Dean Greer Glazer told the UC Health Media Room. “The UC College of Nursing has a long-standing reputation of educating nurse leaders, and we are honored to have the opportunity to educate a passionate, intelligent group of leaders to continue our legacy within the Academic Health Center.”

To qualify for the free tuition and 12-month program, nurses must be employed at least a year by UC Health and agree to continue working at UC Health for at least two years after completing the program. The UC Health nursing leadership will select students to participate over the next three years.

“Nurse leaders will consider an employee’s dedication to UC Health values, mission statement and vision, the recommendations from management and other nurse leadership, employment history with UC Health, work ethic and previous academic achievement,” UC Health communications consultant Elizabeth Bielman told The News Record.

The program consists of nine courses and allows students to choose between part-time and full-time, to accommodate their working schedules. Students will take three courses each fall, spring, and summer semester to finish their BSN degree within 12 months.

Clarence Pauley, UC Health senior vice president and chief human resources officer, shared with the UC Health Media Room: “This program embodies a critically important component of our tripartite mission of providing education, clinical research and the highest standard of patient care. UC Health strongly believes in investing in advancement and growth opportunities for its nurses, who are integral to the patient journey and to our organization.”

Nursing Program Expanded at Eastern Mennonite University

Nursing Program Expanded at Eastern Mennonite University

Eastern Mennonite University has recently grown its nursing program, in order to increase admissions and help with the nationwide nursing shortage. The Lisa Haverstick Memorial Nursing Laboratory was expanded and upgraded to allow the school to admit 16 more nursing students each academic year.

“We always have a wait list of qualified people who are unable to get into our program,” EMU Associate Professor Laura Yoder shared with VirginiaBusiness.com. With the expansion of the Nursing Laboratory, the average graduating class for the undergraduate nursing program will increase from 48 to 64 students, easing the wait list.

EMU has offered nursing degrees for over fifty years, including undergraduate and graduate nursing degree programs and a doctoral program in nursing practice. Yoder shared that the private liberal arts college sees nursing as a calling, considering both the nurse-patient relationship and the faculty-student relationship throughout their nursing programs.

“We’re very concerned about values and what it means to think about the common good, and doing health care in a way that serves those who are in need and have difficulty accessing care,” Yoder said. “Many EMU nursing students serve low-income patients, refugees and immigrants.”

The nursing program expansion costs roughly $245,000. With $90,000 already raised, EMU anticipates raising the rest of the funds by the end of 2018.

UMass Dartmouth Doctoral Nursing Student Receives Jonas Philanthropies Grant

UMass Dartmouth Doctoral Nursing Student Receives Jonas Philanthropies Grant

A University of Massachusetts Dartmouth student was recently awarded a $10,000 grant from Jonas Philanthropies. Christine Fournier Bell, a second-year nursing Ph.D student, received the Jonas Nurse Scholar grant for studying the effects of combined educational and behavioral intervention on pain management practices.

“Christine was chosen for this honor based on her scholarly record and her commitment to improving the care of persons with substance use disorders through nursing intervention in the acute care setting,” said UMass Dartmouth College of Nursing Dean Kimberly Christopher. “We are very proud of Christine Bell and of our Ph.D. program. This is a wonderful testament to our program.”

Bell is the second Jonas Scholar from UMass Dartmouth. In addition to receiving the grant, she will participate in the Jonas Nurse Leaders Program in Washington DC.

“I am humbled and grateful for such an honor,” Bell shared with the UMass Dartmouth Office of Public Affairs. “As a nurse who cares deeply for this population, I look forward to working alongside nurses to find new ways to provide innovative care and treatment to people living with the disease of substance use disorder. There is always hope.”

Launched in 2008, the Jonas Nurse Scholars program has awarded more than 1,000 scholars across the US. The invitation-only program supports development of doctoral nursing students to address the nationwide nursing faculty shortage.

For more information about the Jonas Scholars and Jonas Philanthropies, click here. For more information about the UMass Dartmouth College of Nursing, click here.

New Simulation Lab Strengthens Nurse Education at Midland University

New Simulation Lab Strengthens Nurse Education at Midland University

Midland University and Methodist Fremont Health opened a new $1 million simulation lab earlier this summer, providing simulated learning to medical students. The lab, constructed inside of Methodist Fremont Health Center, is used both by medical professionals and Midland University students.

Located in a modern wing of Fremont Health Center, the lab includes five hi-fidelity Gaumard Manikins. Deborah Brester, MSN, RN, a professor at Midland University, has already seen how students are greatly benefiting from having access to simulated learning in addition to their classroom education. “The lab complements the traditional clinical experience by allowing our students to experience real-life scenarios,” Brester said. “You can simulate an entire birthing experience, cardiac arrest ­— anything. You can give IVs and draw blood. Instructors can even speak through them and simulate distress.”

Brester, who is currently leading Midland’s mother/baby nursing class, is also using the simulation lab for her own doctoral dissertation, as she pursues her Ph.D. in nursing education at Midland.

“We can create scenarios that [students] may not otherwise ever be exposed to in a clinical setting,” she shared. “This builds a tremendous amount of confidence and enhances critical thinking skills that they’ll use throughout their careers.”

The Gaumard Manikins use “Care in Motion” simulation technology, which allows students to treat the Manikins like actual patients in different environments. In addition to the manikins, students are able to practice on the same equipment that Fremont Health medical professionals use every day.

“The simulation lab represents our vision to provide relevant opportunities, dynamic experiences, and innovative programs for Midland students by working from the marketplace back,” Midland University President said. “Marketplace relevancy is twofold: educational programs that prepare our students for the careers of today and tomorrow, and partnership with organizations in our community to create opportunities for continuous employee development.”

To learn more about Midland University’s nursing program, click here.

GW Nursing Students Teach Middle Schoolers About Heart Health

GW Nursing Students Teach Middle Schoolers About Heart Health

Students from the George Washington University (GW) School of Nursing have recently completed the school’s first installation of a two-month program teaching DC middle schoolers about heart disease and healthy living.

The program was funded by a grant from the Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation which partnered GW Nursing with the AnBryce Foundation, a nonprofit that focuses on community-building for middle school students. Eleven students in the nursing school have attended the Saturday Institute at Thurgood Marshall Academy every week since September to teach children how to keep their hearts healthy and how social factors can impact their health.

Karen Dawn, co-principal investigator of the program and an assistant professor of nursing, said people in the county where the middle school is located die 10 to 15 years earlier than people living in other areas in DC, highlighting the importance of teaching children that diet, exercise, genetics, and location all impact heart health, and children should start eating foods that are good for the heart and stay physically active at an early age to prevent heart disease.

Dawn tells GWHatchet.com, “Our job in the School of Nursing, especially mine being the director of community health and public health for the undergraduates, is to make sure we’re helping people in the communities that we work in. We don’t just teach our students, we want them to be able to go out and help the communities and see some sustainability there.”

The program has helped middle school students understand that factors outside their control – like not having access to parks, sidewalks, or grocery stores – impact how they stay healthy. The GW nursing students worked with the middle school students to teach heart-healthy practices through interactive activities like watching videos and playing games.

To learn more about GW Nursing’s two-month program to teach DC middle schoolers about heart disease and healthy living, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: SUNY Delhi Nursing Student Keara Lawson Treats Crash Victim On Way to Clinical Rotations

Nurse of the Week: SUNY Delhi Nursing Student Keara Lawson Treats Crash Victim On Way to Clinical Rotations

Our Nurse of the Week is Keara Lawson, a nursing student at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Delhi who was driving from Delhi to Stamford for her clinical placement when she witnessed an accident and stopped to help the crash victim. The quick-thinking student received a real-life lesson in first response that she will carry with her for the rest of her career.

At 6:15 AM on a morning in October, the sun was not yet up as Lawson was driving herself and three fellow nursing students through cold rain when the car ahead of her slowed down before a vehicle swerved into her lane. Lawson recalls seeing the oncoming vehicle hit something before a huge explosion happened and something on fire flew into the ditch.

Lawson pulled over and got out as the driver also stepped out of his vehicle, in shock and experiencing tunnel vision. He told the nursing students they needed to call 911 because he had just hit a woman. The driver ran into the ditch and pulled a woman out of the fire and began rolling her in the dirt.

According to TheDailyStar.com, state troopers reported that a woman had been walking southbound holding a gas can, and when she was struck, the gas can exploded. Lawson saw the woman on the ground, and the driver and nursing students quickly ran over to help comfort her and keep her conscious until paramedics arrived.

Lawson recalls, “We had nothing but our textbooks, stethoscopes and our brains. [The paramedics] were really thankful that we were able to give them information so they knew exactly what to do when they got there.”

Lawson and her classmates were only 10 weeks into their first year of nursing school, but this is an experience they will carry with them for the rest of their careers. She felt a passion and instinct to help, assuring her that she’s pursuing the right career path. To learn more about SUNY Delhi nursing student Keara Lawson who treated a crash victim on her way to her clinical rotations, visit here.

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