Participating in Interprofessional Education: Why It’s Important for Nursing Students, Part 2

Participating in Interprofessional Education: Why It’s Important for Nursing Students, Part 2

Nursing students’ education should never occur in a vacuum. Because most nurses will work not only with patients throughout their careers, but also with varied health care professionals, it’s important for them to learn how to work with others even before they begin their employment. This is where interprofessional education comes into play.

In Part 2 of our interview, Judith Haber and Erin Hartnett of NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing continue our conversation about why it’s so important for nursing students. (Revisit Part 1 of our interview here.)

This year, the study was on oral-systemic health. But have the students studied other health care issues in previous years? Why or why not? How are the issues chosen?

Judi Haber: NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and the OHNEP and TOSH programs have been at the vanguard of changing the national landscape about the importance of integrating oral health as an essential component of overall health. This priority addressed a national “Call to Action” by the Surgeon General in 2000 to address the gap in meeting the oral health care needs of the American public and to consider the relationship of oral health to overall health. Our programs have made a significant impact by “putting the mouth back in the head” in nursing education and clinical practice. 

Oral health and its links to overall health is our OHNEP and TOSH priority.  Because of the connections between oral health and numerous systemic health conditions like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, kidney disease, cancer, dementia, autoimmune conditions, and others, students are exposed to a wide variety of acute and chronic health problems. This provides a perfect platform to for interprofessional learning because it requires the clinical knowledge and expertise of multiple professions to create a care plan that is patient-centered and addresses the needs of the whole person. We have designed and implemented interprofessional clinical experiences across the lifespan that address the oral-systemic needs of each population: prenatal, pediatric, adult, and older adult.

What were the results from this interprofessional educational experience?

Judi Haber: We evaluate our interprofessional experiences using the Interprofessional Competencies Attainment Scale (ICCAS) before and after each experience. Our evidence shows a significant change in student self-reported interprofessional competencies from pre- to post-test across the professions.

What did the nurses learn from working with students in other disciplines?

Haber and Hartnett: Students from all four disciplines — Nursing, Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy — felt that TOSH was a positive experience as evidenced from some of their comments.

“It was mostly actually us teaching each other. The facilitator was there if we had any questions, but she kind of popped in and out and just sort of listened, and let us sort of take the reins which was good.”
Shoshana Gindi, NYU Adult-Geriatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Student

“Usually at Long Island University, we’re with pharmacy students only, so this allowed us to basically see other professions and their points of views when it comes to assessing patients.”
Nada Annr, LIU Pharmacy Student

“It was kind of cool to see the role reversal when we got to the part where we were talking about the patient management because we got to learn more about the medications, the medical conditions, how those are managed, and kind of what their focus was versus ours and how those come together.”
Charlotte Guerrera, NYU Dental Student

“It’s good to really get another perspective from other specialties. The dentists will specifically ask about oral questions; a medical student will ask complete body questions. We can learn how to approach patients in a broader way.”
Brandon Oks, NYU Medical Student

“More and more in today’s world, we’re working with the other disciplines in the health care setting. We’re also learning the background of other people’s specialties: what their schooling looks like and what their clinical work looks like. I think that really helps, especially in the nursing field and nurse practitioners making a name for themselves. I think it helps to kind of normalize the battlefield in a sense and give everybody an understanding of what our education looks like.”
RoseMarie Cafone, NYU Psych-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Student

“I have sort of a general idea of what the different professions do, but I really didn’t have any sort of deeper understanding of everything that they bring to the table. I think when we were interviewing the patient, just hearing the kinds of questions that they were asking–what they were focused on–was really helpful in understanding how they’re approaching a patient. And then we were all sitting around a table hearing what they were most concerned about really illustrated for me what each profession is really bringing to that conversation.”
Elana Kreiger-Benson, NYU Medical Student

“We talked about, ‘Would this be valuable in the real world?’ And we all agreed, yes, because especially today in our world with health care changing, it’s even harder to communicate, and communication’s a big problem. Hopefully there’s more trainings like this to help give better communication among all the different health care professions.”
Stephanie Fanelli, NYU Dental Student

“I don’t usually get to interact with dentistry students, so that part was amazing. Being able to see how a dentistry student or a pharmacist would be able to approach an issue with the patient’s mouth was helpful, and being able to make a plan for this patient and create an interdisciplinary team approach to caring for this patient was great.”
Megan Fendt, NYU Midwifery Student

 “A couple more of these a year would be beneficial.”
Brandon Oks, NYU Medical Student

What else is important for our readers to know about interprofessional education?

Erin Hartnett: The Oral Health Nursing Education and Practice Program (OHNEP), an innovative national initiative led by Executive Director Judith Haber, and Program Director Erin Hartnett has just been designated as a 2019 Edge Runner from the American Academy of Nursing. This initiative recognizes those individuals and organizations who are leaders in designing models of care and interventions to improve health care cost and access. OHNEP [received] this award on October 24, 2019, for its leadership in “putting the mouth back in the head” in nursing education and clinical practice, improving clinical outcomes, and making positive contributions to the financial health of organizations.

Participating in Interprofessional Education: Why It’s Important for Nursing Students, Part 1

Participating in Interprofessional Education: Why It’s Important for Nursing Students, Part 1

NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing has been offering interprofessional education experiences for its nursing students since 2006. To explain how it works and why it’s essential for nursing education, we interviewed Judith Haber, PhD, APRN, FAAN, the Ursula Springer Leadership Professor in Nursing and Executive Director of the Oral Health Nursing Education and Practice (OHNEP) Program at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, and Erin Hartnett, DNP, PPCNP-BC, CPNP, the Program Director of OHNEP and Teaching Oral-Systemic Health (TOSH) Programs at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing.

Haber and Hartnett took time to answer our questions. What follows is Part 1 of our interview. Keep on the lookout for Part 2 next week.

Why do you offer interprofessional education for nursing students? Why is it important?

Judi Haber: These experiences are an important component of the education of all students in the health professions. Historically, health education in the United States has been delivered in well-established silos. Yet patients come to primary and acute care health care settings with health problems that cross the boundaries of those disciplines. Student exposure to interprofessional education (IPE) experiences are designed to break down the traditional professional silos and prepare students to practice in teams that understand each other’s roles and responsibilities, value and respect the contributions of all team members, and communicate and function effectively on interprofessional health care teams. That is the health system model of the present and future!

Professional practice silos also have been documented in a series of reports by the Institute of Medicine (2001; 2003) to have a negative impact on the quality and safety of patient care. Fostering interdisciplinary team building and collaborative practice was proposed to improve patient outcomes; a call to action challenged faculty educating students in the health professions to educate them interprofessionally as members of collaborative teams who “learned from, with, and about each other.” Publication of the Interprofessional Education Competencies (IPEC) in 2011 propelled this interprofessional education agenda and soon accreditation standards for nursing, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and other professions required evidence that students were being exposed to interprofessional education experiences. 

Essentially, these interprofessional education experiences are preparing students to “hit the ground running,” prepared to practice in high-performing teams following graduation.

What other students work with them? At what schools are they studying?

Judi Haber: The NYU interprofessional education experiences have always had a clinical focus and have always included dental and medical students and, more recently, pharmacy students.

What happens during this three-day study? How does it work?

Erin Hartnett: The TOSH–Teaching Oral Systemic Health event has been held every September for the past seven years. In 2013, we started with about 300 students from three schools–NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, NYU College of Dentistry, and NYU School of Medicine–and in 2019, our seventh year, we have almost 800 students from four schools–NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, NYU College of Dentistry, NYU School of Medicine, and Long Island University (LIU) Pharmacy.

TOSH brings together students from different health professions to participate in an interprofessional oral health simulation with a Standardized Patient and a case study discussion experience to learn from, with, and about each other. The goals of this experience are for the student to learn about oral health, specifically the oral health connection, and the oral exam; as well as to learn to work together as a team using the interprofessional educational competencies (IPEC competencies) to learn each other’s roles and responsibilities, values, and ethics and to learn to communicate and collaborate as a team for the good of the patient–to provide better, safer, more cost effective health care

Prior to the TOSH experience, all of the students are required to complete an assignment, which includes: two Smiles for Life Modules, read about the IPEC competencies, watch a video on the TeamSTEPPS®  SBAR communication techniques, and read an article about prescribing for acute dental pain (Clark et al, 2010; Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality).

Part 1

When students arrive at the Simulation Center, they take the Interprofessional Collaborative Competency Attainment Survey (ICCAS) on their phone (MacDonald, Archibald, Trumpower, Casimiro, Cragg, & Jelly, 2018). The ICCAS measures their interprofessional competencies prior to the experience. Students are then assigned to a team consisting of a nurse practitioner, midwifery, medical, dental, and pharmacy student.  They work together as a team obtaining a focused history from the Standardized Patient– which should lead them to suspect Type 2 Diabetes, periodontal disease, and acute dental pain.

The dental student then demonstrates the oral exam on the Standardized Patient to the other students, and each student is then required to practice the oral exam on the Standardized Patient with the dental student as mentor.

Part 2

The teams then all move to a case study discussion room where they meet with another team. The students introduce themselves to the other team and then each profession pairs with the member of their profession to develop a problem list. After completing the problem list, both groups meet back together to develop a care plan, which incorporates each profession.

Students then role-play calling each other on the phone using the TeamSTEPPS® SBAR technique to explain the Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendations for this patient.

At the end of the experience the students debrief with their facilitator on how the IPEC competencies were met.

Is participation required for nursing students or voluntary? Do the nursing students need to be in a particular semester in order to participate?

Erin Hartnett: All second-year NP and Midwifery students, fourth-year dental students, second-year medical students, and fourth-year pharmacy students are required to attend.

Penn State Donors Establish $10 Million Nursing Scholarship

Penn State Donors Establish $10 Million Nursing Scholarship

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — An anonymous Penn State donor couple has made a gift of $5 million to endow a scholarship for students with financial need in the College of Nursing. This is the largest single gift the college has received in its six-year history. In addition, the University is matching the gift 1:1, bringing the scholarship endowment total to $10 million. Students from western Pennsylvania and rural regions of the commonwealth will be given first preference for the awards.

“The College of Nursing’s potential for impact on the health of communities across the commonwealth is vast, and these donors have recognized that potential through this remarkable gift,” said Penn State President Eric J. Barron. “Their support will help to address the commonwealth’s pressing need for health care professionals and allow recipients to forge meaningful careers in nursing, transforming their own lives. We’re very grateful for this generous gift.”

College of Nursing undergraduates who must meet the cost of a Penn State degree with loans graduate, on average, with an educational debt of more than $42,500. Recipients of the scholarship, however, will receive annual awards of up to $10,000. This will significantly reduce their debt and allow them more latitude to choose jobs in high-need but lower-paid geographic areas and medical fields that present the most urgent need for nurses.

“The extraordinary couple who made this gift have been impressed by the excellence of Penn State’s nursing programs,” said Laurie Badzek, dean and professor of the College of Nursing. “In particular, they appreciate our work to prepare a generation of nurses with a solid grounding in geriatrics and community health.”

“Nursing is a discipline that touches everyone’s life at some point, and these generous donors are helping to ensure better care across the commonwealth,” said Susan Kukic, director of development and alumni relations for the college. “While they have chosen to remain anonymous, they are important role models whose vision for the future of our students and our college will, I hope, inspire others to consider how they can support excellence in nursing and nursing education.”  

For information on this scholarship and the nursing program at Penn State, visit here.

Where Are You Most Needed? 6 Nursing Shortage Facts for Students

Where Are You Most Needed? 6 Nursing Shortage Facts for Students

It’s no secret that the United States is in desperate need of nurses. Due to patients living longer, educational bottlenecks, and a staggeringly high turnover rate in the health care industry, the nursing shortage is a growing problem that’s putting serious pressure on nursing staff around the country.

As a nursing student, you’re probably well aware of these issues. In fact, it may even be one of the primary reasons you’re pursuing a nursing career in the first place. After all, what could be more fulfilling than providing care and support for patients who desperately need it?

There are several areas—both physical and occupational—where the need for nurses is at an all-time high. If your true calling is to make a difference in the lives of your patients, here are six nursing shortage facts that may influence where you end up after graduation.

1. California has the greatest nursing shortage of any state.

Although California employs the highest number of registered nurses in the country, it needs more—a lot more, in fact. According to a 2017 report by the Health Resources and Services Administration, California is predicted to have the highest demand for nurses in the country, with a shortage of nearly 45,000 registered nurses.

With its strong economy and thriving metropolitan areas, California has long been a desirable place to live. If you’re thinking about working as a nurse in the Golden State, check out the California Nursing Students’ Association (CNSA) for mentorship and networking opportunities.

2. Rural towns need the most help.

If you prefer small town life to the hustle and bustle of urban living, health care institutions in rural America will gladly accept your help. Attracting and retaining qualified nurses has long been a problem for hospitals in rural locations, mainly due to the lower pay rate and less lively social scene.

While the pay may be lower, the cost of living is often lower as well. Plus, you’ll never deal with the insane traffic that you’d find in a metropolitan area. For nursing students who truly want to make a difference, the rural health care workforce is in desperate need of help.

3. Demand for certified nurse midwives is growing.

What could be more meaningful than caring for the newest generation? Certified nurse midwives are experiencing a huge surge in demand lately as more couples wish for positive and natural birth experiences.

According to statistics from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of nurse midwives is expected to grow 21% by 2026, with 1,700 jobs created in this occupation. As an added bonus, you’re looking at a median wage of $106,910 for this field, per estimates from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

4. Certified nurse anesthetists, dialysis nurses, and other nurse specialties are growing, too.

In addition to certified nurse midwives, there is a growing number of in-demand nurse specialties that nursing students should consider. Making one of these specialties your primary focus can help you facilitate change in the health care industry and pave the way towards a fulfilling career:

  • Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNAs): CRNAs work with surgeons, anesthesiologists, and other health care professionals to safely deliver anesthesia to patients. CRNAs are one of the higher-paying fields in the industry, with a mean annual wage of $174,790.
  • Certified Dialysis Nurse (CDN): As our population continues to age, the need for dialysis services is growing. A CDN assists their patients with kidney function issues by supporting the administration of dialysis with a physician. Growth for this job is steady and is expected to increase 26% over the next decade.
  • Pediatric Endocrinology (PED ENDO) Nurse: As a PED ENDO nurse, you’ll provide care and support for children with endocrine disorders such as diabetes or hypoglycemia. Unfortunately, the need for this occupation may be growing due to our increasing risk of diabetes and obesity.

5. The need for nurse educators has never been greater.

One of the reasons why the country is facing such an immense shortage of registered nurses is partly due to educational bottlenecks. With an aging faculty, budget issues, and low pay, the demand for nurse educators is at an all-time high.

According to a 2017 study published in Nursing Outlook, one-third of current nurse educators are expected to retire by 2025. Most younger faculty members who may potentially replace them don’t have nearly the same level of experience as their older counterparts.

To address this shortage, many nursing programs and organizations are providing more funding for nursing students to seek doctoral degrees to replenish the supply of nurse educators and researchers. If you’re a current nursing student, don’t be afraid to talk with your advisor or senior nursing students about pursuing a doctoral degree.

6. Travel nurses can greatly benefit nurses and hospitals alike.

Travel nursing is just one of the ways in which the nation is addressing the decades-long nursing shortage. Being a travel nurse is exactly what it sounds like: You sign a short-term contract and travel to wherever you’re needed most, often for much better pay than staff nurses.

If you’ve always dreamed of packing your nursing bag to see more of the world while making a positive difference in the lives of your patients, becoming a travel nurse can help you achieve both. Although you need roughly 18 months of experience in a nursing specialty to be a travel nurse, the opportunity to travel internationally or across the country for a high pay rate is undeniably appealing.

As a nursing student, you have the potential to make a huge impact in your community. Whether it’s by pursuing a doctoral degree or living the life of a traveling nurse, your choices going forward can make all the difference. By keeping these six nursing shortage facts in the back of your mind, you can opt for an extremely rewarding career path that sets you up for success.

Golden Careers: Gerontology in Action

Golden Careers: Gerontology in Action

Only one group of Americans has more than doubled in size over the past twenty years: the elderly. They’ve experienced more than most in their lifetimes, from world wars to the first man on the moon. Thanks to lengthening life spans, they have much more to experience; over 41.4 million Americans are 65 and older – that’s more than 13.3 percent of the total U.S. population.1

As this golden group ages, how can we serve and love the elders that hold such a special place in our communities and families?

GERONTOLOGY CAREERS

Case worker

The role of geriatric social workers includes:

  • Helping senior citizens cope with common problems experienced by the elderly
  • Ensuring the needs of their clients are met from day-to-day
  • Providing aid with financial issues, medical care, mental disorders and social problems

Geriatric care manager

Care managers help the elderly and their loved ones develop a long-term care plan and connect with necessary services.

Healthcare business manager

These managers make sure healthcare facilities provide the most effective patient care. This includes planning and coordinating services in hospitals and clinics.

Art therapist

Art therapy uses the visual and auditory arts to help restore function and general wellbeing. Benefits can include:

  • Increased cognitive skills
  • Intellectual stimulation
  • Improved motor skills
  • Alleviated pain
  • Socialization
  • Self-expression

78 percent of art therapists report working with older adults on a regular basis.2

Grief counselor

Grief counselors help seniors process bereavement and loss, as well as cope with thoughts of their own death.

Assisted living administrator

Administrators manage assisted living facilities or services, which provide care to adults who need help with daily tasks like bathing, eating and dressing.

Health educator

These educators provide the elderly with lessons that inform them about health concerns.

Physical therapist

Physical therapists help aging adults strengthen their muscles, increase mobility and improve endurance. They also help with recovery from an injury or illness.

HELPING AND HEALING

The elderly are likely to face hardships, but with our help, they don’t have to go through them alone.

Bereavement and loss

A natural part of the aging process is experiencing the loss of loved ones as well as coping with one’s own progressing age. Seniors often experience bereavement and loss differently than younger adults, which puts them at risk for depression, anxiety and PTSD. Grieving seniors can benefit from the support others as they work through difficult times.

75 percent of adults 50 and older reported finding humor and laughter in their daily lives.3

Family caregiving

Family caregivers play a crucial role in keeping the elderly comfortable at home by providing support like:

  • Economic resources
  • Loving relationships and companionship
  • Minimal health and wellness assistance
  • Support with day-to-day needs

More than 10 percent of the U.S. population have served as unpaid caregivers for older adults.4

Health promotion and self-care

Age can prevent seniors from properly taking care of their bodies, but we can help our loved ones stay beautiful and healthy. Helping the elderly groom themselves, receive regular medical attention and stay active can go a long way in promoting general wellbeing.

Disabilities

In more extreme cases, seniors may experience disabilities or other chronic health conditions. You can support older adults by ensuring they can access the healthcare professionals and resources they need. This might involve assistance with transportation and attending to business, legal and medical concerns.

75 percent of seniors have at least one chronic health condition, and most have two or more.5

End-of-life and palliative care

As our loved ones enter their final days, specialized care can help provide relief from the symptoms and stress. End-of-life and palliative care makes their last days as pain-free and comfortable as possible.

Quality of long-term care

Fortunately, there are a number of geriatric professionals trained to provide excellent care for aging adults in all of these areas. A growing population of the elderly means the demand for these practitioners is greater than ever – and there are more opportunities for you to bring wellness and care into the lives of the elderly than ever.

Interested in a career in a gerontology? Pursuing an online master’s degree can help. Learn more at: https://www.cune.edu/academics/graduate/master-healthcare-administration/gerontology/

SOURCES

  1. https://www.upi.com/133-percent-in-US-are-seniors/75971362689252/
  2. American Art Therapy Association
  3. https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/basics/info-2017/truth-about-grief.html
  4. https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/geriatrics/social-issues-in-the-elderly/family-caregiving-for-the-elderly
  5. National Council on Aging

This sponsored story is brought to you by Concordia University Nebraska.

New Dual Admission Partnership Between UMSON and CCBC

New Dual Admission Partnership Between UMSON and CCBC

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) and the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) recently joined forces to offer a new dual admission BSN program. CCBC is the thirteenth school to create a dual-admission partnership agreement with the school.

Dual-admission partnerships are growing in popularity nationally, as more people are seeking out RN-to-BSN opportunities. These kinds of programs benefit not only the program participants, but the schools and healthcare employers as well. As the nursing shortage continues through the United States, hospitals and health organizations are constantly looking for ways to meet staffing needs.

This is one of several RN-to-BSN partnerships that CCBC has with various universities across Maryland, but the requirements at UMSON are different. “The UMSON partnership is unique, as the dual admission pathway provides flexibility and choice to CCBC students,” Linda Murray, DNP, CPNP-Ped, assistant professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, shared. “The UMSON CCBC partnership does not require students to take BSN courses while still in the ADN program, but affords them the flexibility to take courses if they wish.”

Additional requirements include admission into CCBC’s ADN program, and completion of the first semester of the nursing program at CCBC. But while CCBC has several campuses, this program opportunity is only available to students at the Catonsville and Essex locations.

Since fall 2016, UMSON has admitted 139 dual admission students. These dual admission programs allow students to balance their coursework and work and home responsibilities, giving students the option to continue working, instead of solely focusing on their academics.

Beyond saving time in this RN-to-BSN program, students will also save money. “UMSON is currently covering the cost of its BSN courses for students participating in the dual-admission partnership while they are still enrolled in the ADN program, an opportunity made possible with funds from a gift from Bill and Joanne Conway through their Bedford Falls Foundation,” Murray said. “Once the student graduates from their ADN program and matriculates into UMSON, they can apply for a full Conway Scholarship, which covers the costs of in-state tuition, fees, and books for the duration of the program.”

For more information about the UMSON-CCBC dual admission program, click here.


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