New Study From Penn Nursing Links Nurse Work Environments With Outcomes

New Study From Penn Nursing Links Nurse Work Environments With Outcomes

A new meta-analysis from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing’s (Penn Nursing) Center for Health Outcomes & Policy Research (CHOPR) has synthesized 16 years of studies to show the association between the nurse work environment and four sets of outcomes: nurse job outcomes, nurse assessments of quality and safety, patient health outcomes, and patient satisfaction. 

Nurses play a critical role in patient safety and new research from Penn Nursing explores the relationship between the nurse work environment and a variety of patient and nurse quality and safety outcomes. Nurses are often the last line of defense against medical errors and unsafe practices and this new research shows an association between nurse work environments and health care quality, safety, and patient and clinician well-being. 

Lead-investigator Eileen T. Lake, PhD, MSN, FAAN, the Jessie M. Scott Endowed Term Chair in Nursing and Health Policy, tells TheDP.com, “Our quantitative synthesis of the results of many studies revealed that better work environments were associated with lower odds of negative outcomes ranging from patient and nurse job dissatisfaction to patient mortality.”

The study involved a systematic review of studies from around the world that reported empirical research using the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. The study reported data from more than 2,600 hospitals, 165,000 nurses, and 1.3 million patients about the practice environment, nurse job outcomes, safety and quality ratings, patient outcomes, and patient satisfaction.

To learn more about Penn Nursing’s new study linking better work environments with lower odds of negative outcomes, visit here

Pitt-Greensburg Receives $1.5 Million Grant for Growing Nursing Degree Program

Pitt-Greensburg Receives $1.5 Million Grant for Growing Nursing Degree Program

The University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg was recently granted $1.5 million from the Katherine Mabis McKenna Foundation to support its growing nursing degree program. The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program welcomed its second class of students this fall and is recruiting its third.

The program is affiliated with the internationally recognized University of Pittsburgh’s School of Nursing and holds national accreditation through the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. Pitt-Greensburg hopes to address a shortage of nurses in the region who have earned degrees. The university expects to have 300 students enrolled in the program by 2020 and to graduate 75 nurses each year.

Marie Fioravanti, director of nursing at Pitt-Greensburg, tells triblive.com, “The BSN is quickly becoming a required degree by major health care providers in the region and the nation. Studies show that hospital units employing nurses with BSN degrees post significantly lower mortality rates than those staffed by non-BSN-degreed nurses.”

The Katherine Mabis McKenna Foundation has provided support to Pitt-Greensburg in the past, helping to fund academic halls and technology improvements. The new grant will allow the university to enroll more nursing students and students will have the opportunity to participate in more than 900 hours of clinical experiences at health care facilities in neighboring counties.

To learn more about the $1.5 million grant awarded to University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg’s nursing program, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Jewish Trauma Nurse Ari Mahler Shows Compassion While Treating Synagogue Shooter

Nurse of the Week: Jewish Trauma Nurse Ari Mahler Shows Compassion While Treating Synagogue Shooter

Our Nurse of the Week is Ari Mahler, a trauma nurse in Pittsburgh and a member of the Tree of Life synagogue’s Jewish congregation, who treated suspected synagogue shooter Robert Bowers after he was brought in to be treated for multiple gunshot wounds from police. The tragic October 27th shooting that killed more than 11 people left Mahler in fear that his own parents may have been victims of the shooting, especially his father who is a rabbi, but he felt compelled to do his job as a nurse and show compassion to his patient regardless of his actions.

Mahler’s story emerged after Allegheny General Hospital President Jeffrey Cohen, who is also Jewish and a member of the Tree of Life Synagogue, told news outlets that a Jewish nurse and Jewish doctor treated the suspected shooter. After seeing local news stations talking about the care he provided that day, Mahler decided to respond with a Facebook post that has since been shared more than 171,000 times.

Bowers had no idea that his nurse was Jewish and Mahler did not disclose that fact while providing treatment. Mahler’s viral Facebook post, which begins with the words “I am The Jewish Nurse,” go on to explain:

“I wanted him to feel compassion. I chose to show him empathy. I felt that the best way to honor his victims was for a Jew to prove him wrong. Besides, if he finds out I’m Jewish, does it really matter? The better question is, what does it mean to you?”

Mahler ultimately provided lifesaving care to his patient as an act of love and humanity, reaffirming that love in the face of evil can provide hope and a path forward. To read Mahler’s full account of treating suspected synagogue shooter Robert Bowers, visit here.

Penn Futures Project Appoints Nursing Faculty Leader to Serve Children and Families of Philadelphia

Penn Futures Project Appoints Nursing Faculty Leader to Serve Children and Families of Philadelphia

The Penn Futures Project, a collaborative effort among three Penn schools serving the Philadelphia community, has appointed new faculty leaders to serve the children and families of Philadelphia. Deans from three Penn schools named Nursing and Nutrition professor Terri Lipman and Child Development and Education professor Vivian Gadsden to serve as the project’s first faculty leaders.

The program was launched in 2015 to promote an interdisciplinary approach to serving the children and families of Philadelphia. Members of the School of Nursing, School of Social Policy and Practice, and Graduate School of Education collaboratively aim to help local community members while simultaneously providing community-based training for graduate students in the field.

Penn Futures oversee five initiatives including a data analysis project to map communities that need pre-kindergarten service, the development of a multidisciplinary child welfare certificate, and the formation of guidelines to train teachers, nurses, and social workers to better serve LGBTQ students. The program also oversees the Calvin Bland Faculty Fellowship which supports one faculty member from each of the three Penn schools to research race, gender, and health in communities of color.

Lipman is the assistant dean for community engagement for Penn Nursing and previously served as director of Penn’s Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner program. To learn more about Penn Nursing professor Terri Lipman and her new role as faculty leader for the Penn Futures Project, visit here.

Nurses of the Week: Penn Nursing Grads Fundraise Scholarship for Midwives of Color

Nurses of the Week: Penn Nursing Grads Fundraise Scholarship for Midwives of Color

Our Nurses of the Week are the student nurses of the University of Pennsylvania Nurse-Midwifery program who have created a scholarship for midwives of color. Each class of the program delivers a class gift to their professors prior to graduation like artwork or a charity donation, but the Class of 2017 decided to try something unconventional.

The students reported that their inspiration came from looking around their own classroom and realizing that only two students out of the 21 person class were students of color. Nursing graduate Kateryn Nunez, one of the two students of color in her graduating class, tells TheDP.com, “The point of the scholarship is to address the fact that over 95 percent of midwives in the US are white, whereas the people they care for, the majority are people of color, are poor people, are immigrants, LGBTQ.”

Midwives provide a personalized approach to childbirth for healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies. This was originally a common practice among black and immigrant populations but a stigma around home births discouraged people from communities of color from going into the field. As the “natural birth” movement gained popularity in recent decades, it created a racial imbalance in the profession that still exists today.

One of the largest barriers to entry for students of color to become midwives is affordability, which is why the 2017 Penn Nurse-Midwife class decided to create their scholarship. They have raised over $11,000 through grassroots fundraising from friends and family but have a total goal of $125,000. If they reach their goal, Penn will contribute an additional $25,000.

These students hope that their efforts will send a message to other universities about the importance of their scholarship. To learn more about Penn’s Nurse-Midwife program, visit here.

California University of Pennsylvania Offers Master’s Degree in Nursing Education

California University of Pennsylvania Offers Master’s Degree in Nursing Education

With a shortage of registered nurses (RNs) increasing nationwide, the California University of Pennsylvania (Cal U) has begun offering a master of science degree in nursing education to increase the number of faculty available to help train the next generation of nurses.

As RNs continue to get older and retire younger than previous generations, combined with a rise in number of patients and severity of illness, RNs and other healthcare professionals are in strong demand. Students in some health care programs are almost guaranteed jobs after graduation because of the demand for nurses, but there is a lack of nursing educators available to train nurses at the college level.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) released an October 2016 report stating that there were more than 1,500 jobs available for faculty at nursing schools and a need for 133 more to meet today’s demand. Mary O’Connor, program coordinator and professor at California University of Pennsylvania, tells BizJournals.com, “We’re hoping to address the shortage to create faculty for schools of nursing and well-prepared educators to teach in hospitals.”

The creation of the nursing education program was sparked by Cal U’s nursing advisory board who want to help prepare more advanced practice nurses to teach new nurses. The shortage is so severe at some nursing schools that nursing programs have been forced to leave spots for nursing students unfilled because there aren’t enough professors to teach them.

Cal U’s nursing education program is 100 percent online, preparing graduates to instruct nurses in academic or healthcare settings. Students will learn how to develop, implement, and evaluate nursing education programs and curricula during the 36-credit, two-year program.

To learn more about Cal U’s master of science in nursing education degree program, visit here.


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