Nurse of the Week: National Academy of Medicine Names NYU Nursing Professor Allison Squires Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence

Nurse of the Week: National Academy of Medicine Names NYU Nursing Professor Allison Squires Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence

Our Nurse of the Week is Allison Squires, a professor in the NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, who has been selected as the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence for the Future of Nursing 2020-2030 Study.

The Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence program is supported by the American Academy of Nursing, the American Nurses Association, and the American Nurses Foundation. It is a year-long opportunity for a fellow of the Academy to engage with nurse leaders and other scholars at the National Academy of Medicine while helping to develop health policy at the federal level.

Squires is a global health workforce capacity-building researcher with a special interest in improving immigrant and refugee health outcomes. As the NAM Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence, Squires will examine methods for increasing interprofessional collaboration and maximizing the skills of nurses through sustainable development perspectives.

Squires stated in a press release: “I am honored to be selected for this opportunity to represent the American Academy of Nursing, the American Nurses Association, and the American Nurses Foundation while undertaking this important work at the National Academy of Medicine, in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. This is an excellent chance for me to utilize my international focus to advance NAM’s research on health equity and the sustainability of our nation’s nursing workforce.”

Squires was selected as the NAM Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence for her strong policy background and stated focus to examine and address sustainability of the workforce from the perspective of integrating social determinants of health. Her study comes at a critical time and will be vital to determining nursing’s course in the coming decades.

To learn more about NYU Professor Allison Squires who was selected as the National Academy of Medicine Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence for the Future of Nursing 2020-2030 Study, visit here.

Columbia Nursing Researchers Receive Combined $3.73 Million in Grants From US Department of Health and Human Services

Columbia Nursing Researchers Receive Combined $3.73 Million in Grants From US Department of Health and Human Services

Two nurse researchers from the Columbia University School of Nursing have received a combined $3.73 million in grants from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, a unit of the US Department of Health and Human Services. Amanda Hessels, PhD, assistant professor at Columbia Nursing, will receive $1.86 million in funding through a five-year R18 Research Demonstration and Dissemination grant. Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, associate professor at Columbia Nursing, will receive a $1.87 million five-year R01 grant.

Hessels’ study is titled “Simulation to Improve Infection Prevention and Patient Safety: The SIPPS Trial.” The study will test a simulation intervention designed to improve provider performance of standard precautions and prevent healthcare associated infections (HAIs) and occupational blood-borne pathogen exposures.

Hessels tells Newswise.com, “Despite well-established guidelines and training, standard precautions are not reliably practiced, with self-reported adherence among nurses, who have the most direct patient contact in acute care, at less than 50 percent. HAIs are a substantial public health problem affecting approximately two million patients annually, and every year one in 25 registered nurses are exposed to blood-borne pathogens. We think simulation training may improve standard precaution adherence and ultimately improve healthcare quality and safety for patients and providers.”

Poghosyan’s mixed methods study is entitled “Social Networks in Medical Homes and Impact on Patient Care and Outcomes.” The study will combine analysis of team configurations and social networks in Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMH) to assess quality of care and patient outcomes and identify team best practices.

Poghosyan tells Nursing.Columbia.edu, “The PCMH model aims to address such primary care challenges as poor access and quality and rising costs by delivering team-based care. Yet little is known about the composition of effective teams to achieve best patient outcomes. How team members communicate, share advice or help to deliver care, or how social networks affect quality and outcomes have not been studied. Our innovative mixed-methods study will fill this gap to assure the best quality of care and outcomes, particularly for patients with chronic diseases.”

To learn more about Columbia University nurse researchers Amanda Hessels and Lusine Poghosyan who received a combined $3.73 million in grants from the US Department of Health and Human Services, visit here.

Springer Publishing Continues AJN Award Winning Streak

Springer Publishing Continues AJN Award Winning Streak

With a six-year winning streak, Springer Publishing Company is honored to announce that the American Journal of Nursing has chosen 17 of its titles as winners of the 2018 American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year Awards. Springer Publishing Company was the most awarded publisher this year, with 19 awards.

Springer Publishing Company swept up all three awards for the Critical Care-Emergency Nursing Category, and won several awards across 13 other categories. Two titles took home awards across two separate categories each, clinching both first place and third place awards in the Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing category.

View all awarded titles with covers and access to content details today

First Place Awards:

  • Guided Participation in Pediatric Nursing Practice: Relationship-Based Teaching and Learning with Parents, Children, and Adolescents by Karen Pridham, Rana Limbo, and Michele Schroeder is awarded first place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Child Health Category.
  • AACN Core Curriculum for Pediatric High Acuity, Progressive, and Critical Care Nursing by Margaret Slota is awarded first place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Critical Care-Emergency Nursing Category.
  • History of Professional Nursing in the United States: Toward a Culture of Health by Arlene W. Keeling, Michelle C. Hehman, and John Kirchgessner is awarded first place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the History and Public Policy Category.
  • Teaching in Nursing and Role of the Educator: The Complete Guide to Best Practice in Teaching, Evaluation, and Curriculum Development by Marilyn H. Oermann, Jennie C. De Gagne, Beth Cusatis Phillips is awarded first place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Nursing Education/Continuing Education/Professional Development Category.
  • Health Policy and Advanced Practice Nursing: Impact and Implications by Kelly A. Goudreau and Mary C. Smolenski is awarded first place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Nursing Management and Leadership Category.
  • Palliative Care Nursing: Quality Care to the End of Life by Marianne Matzo and Deborah Witt Sherman is awarded first place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Palliative Care and Hospice Category.
  • Quality Caring in Nursing and Health Systems: Implications for Clinicians, Educators, and Leaders by Joanne Duffy is awarded first place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Professional Issues Category.
  • Behavioral Pediatric Healthcare for Nurse Practitioners: A Growth and Developmental Approach to Intercepting Abnormal Behaviors by Donna Hallas is awarded first place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Psychiatric and Mental Health Category.

Second Place Awards:

  • Fast Facts for Managing Patients with a Psychiatric Disorder: What RNs, NPs, and New Psych Nurses Need to Know by Brenda Marshall is awarded second place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Adult Primary Care Category.
  • Disaster Nursing and Emergency Preparedness for Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Terrorism and Other Hazards by Tener Goodwin Veenema is awarded second place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Critical Care-Emergency Nursing Category.
  • Family Practice Guidelines, Digital App is awarded second place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Digital Products Category.

Third Place Awards:

  • Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Nursing by Ruth Lindquist, Mary Fran Tracy, and Mariah Snyder is awarded third place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Adult Primary Care Category.
  • Behavioral Pediatric Healthcare for Nurse Practitioners: A Growth and Developmental Approach to Intercepting Abnormal Behaviors by Donna Hallis is awarded third place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Child Health Category.
  • Stronger After Stroke: Your Roadmap to Recovery by Peter Levine is awarded third place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Consumer Health Category.
  • Obstetric Triage and Emergency Care Protocols by Diane J. Angelini and Donna LaFontaine is awarded third place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Critical Care-Emergency Nursing Category.
  • Self-Neglect in Older Adults: A Global, Evidence-Based Resource for Nurses and Other Health Care Providers by Mary Rose Day, Geraldine McCarthy, and Joyce J. Fitzpatrick is awarded third place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Gerontologic Nursing Category.
  • A Guide to Mastery in Clinical Nursing: The Comprehensive Reference by Joyce Fitzpatrick, Celeste M. Alfes, and Ronald Hickman is awarded third place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Medical-Surgical Nursing Category.
  • Clinical Leadership for Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners by Michael Huckabee is awarded third place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Nursing Management and Leadership Category.
  • Fast Facts for Managing Patients with a Psychiatric Disorder: What RNs, NPs, and New Psych Nurses Need to Know by Brenda Marshall is awarded third place in the 2018 AJN Book of the Year Awards in the Psychiatric and Mental Health Category.

UW-Madison Nurse Researcher Announces Study on Nurse Stress and Fatigue

UW-Madison Nurse Researcher Announces Study on Nurse Stress and Fatigue

Linsey Steege, PhD, a professor in the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison) School of Nursing, has announced a new study on nurse stress and fatigue, which will ultimately improve nurses’ health. Steege will use Fitbits to track the activities of selected nurses throughout the day, gathering data on their steps, heart rate, and sleep to identify factors that cause fatigue and stress in this vital care provider population.

Steege tells mhealthintelligence.com, “I became interested in focusing on how to improve how we support nurses so that they in turn can be safe and provide the highest quality patient care. But when I looked around, there was a lot of research on physical fatigue and sleep deprivation for medical residents, but much less on how nursing work is contributing to fatigue and how fatigue is contributing to stress, burnout, and worst of all, medical error.”

Data can positively impact how we care for ourselves and Steege wants to use data to help nurses understand what contributes to their fatigue. She also wants to collect data on the nurse’s work environment, including noise levels, pages and calls, time spent navigating the hospital’s electronic health record platform, nurse movement patterns, shift staffing reports, and more.

Steege has found that hospitals tend to focus on patient safety while not considering nurse safety and wellbeing at the same time. If health systems don’t account for the burden of fatigue on their nurses, medical errors, turnover, and costs increase. Hospitals have used data to improve workflow in the past, but now they can also look at individual health data and look for specific triggers that cause provider fatigue and stress.

To learn more about new research from Linsey Steege, a nursing professor at UW-Madison who is using Fitbit data to identify factors that cause nurse fatigue and stress, visit here.

Is Your Workplace in Good Shape?

Is Your Workplace in Good Shape?

This online tool for nurses can assess the health of a range of work environments

What makes a work environment healthy? According to the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), it’s a place where healthcare professionals can make their optimal contribution. For almost a decade, critical care nurses have been able to evaluate the health of their work environment with the association’s online assessment tool based on its Healthy Work Environment standards.

Now a new study finds that the tool has applications beyond critical care, and is effective for assessing the health of the work environment for interprofessional patient care teams throughout a hospital’s patient care settings.

“Although AACN’s assessment tool has been used primarily among acute and critical care nurses, our findings support consideration of wider use in multiple healthcare settings,” said the study’s principal investigator, Jean Anne Connor, PhD, RN, CPNP, director of nursing research, cardiovascular, and critical care patient services at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Clinical leaders understand that to safeguard the quality of patient care, attention must be focused on the performance of healthcare teams.”

The Interprofessional Team

The assessment tool is an 18-question survey designed to help organizations or departments identify areas for improvement. It assists in measuring the health of a work environment against AACN’s six Healthy Work Environment standards:

  • Skilled communication
  • True collaboration
  • Effective decision-making
  • Appropriate staffing
  • Meaningful recognition
  • Authentic leadership

The study, published in the American Journal of Critical Care, reports the results of a two-phase administration of the tool to 2,621 patient-care employees at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Researchers administered the survey using a test-retest, two-stage approach. First, the AACN Healthy Work Environment Assessment Tool was administered to all healthcare team members, including physicians, nurses, social workers, therapists, clinical assistants, and administrators.

The first wave of the survey received 1,030 responses from 2,621 potential employee participants. Three weeks later, a second survey was sent to a random sample of 200 potential respondents stratified by role (physician, nurse, and others), and the response rate was 83.5%. The results of the responses showed that the AACN Healthy Work Environments Assessment Tools is reliable and valid, supporting its use as an organizational measure, the researchers concluded.

Expanded Use

They noted that Boston Children’s Hospital has used the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture since 2010 to assess how employees perceive their work environment regarding patient safety. The hospital has also administered the AACN online assessment tool to interprofessional staff in critical care and cardiovascular programs annually since 2010 and recently expanded it to an enterprise-wide assessment.

The team said that study results have been used in the development of measurement benchmarks and led to use of the Healthy Work Environments Assessment Tool in a nurse-led consortium of 30 cardiovascular programs in freestanding children’s hospitals.

This story was originally posted on MedPage Today.

2018 RDML Mary F. Hall Award Presented to NMCSD Nursing Scientists

2018 RDML Mary F. Hall Award Presented to NMCSD Nursing Scientists

Two nurse scientists from the Naval Medical Center San Diego (NMCSD) recently received the 2018 RDML Mary F. Hall award for nursing publication. This highly acclaimed award was created to recognize the contributions to nursing made through professional publications.

This is the second year in a row that Cmdr. Wendy Cook, a Nurse Corps scientist and head of Nursing Research and Analysis at the Clinical Investigation department at NMSCD, has won the award for co-authoring “U.S. Military Service Members’ Reasons for Deciding to Participate in Health Research,” which was published on Research in Nursing and Health.

“It’s a great feeling,” Cook told Defense Visual Information Distribution Services (DVIDS). “I am delighted to have two separate publications recognized two years in a row, especially because I am aware of the high quality of the other nominated publications.”

Cmdr. Abigail Yablonsky, principal investigator for Naval Health Research Center’s Directorate for Military Population Health, is another recipient of the RDML Mary F. Hall award. Her publication, “Research, Readiness, and Military Parents,” which was published by the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service, won first place.

“Both Cmdr. Cook and Cmdr. Yablonsky have been wonderful to work with,” Capt. Heather King, Senior Nurse Researcher at NMSCD, shared with DVIDS. “They are dedicated nurse scientists who continually strive to create and disseminate new knowledge to benefit our NMSCD service members and beneficiaries.”

To read more about the NMCSD recipients of the 2018 RDML Mary F. Hall Award, click here. For more information about the Naval Medical Center San Diego, click here.


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