Clemson Nursing Professor Jane DeLuca Appointed to US Department of Health and Human Services Advisory Committee

Clemson Nursing Professor Jane DeLuca Appointed to US Department of Health and Human Services Advisory Committee

Clemson University School of Nursing associate professor, Jane DeLuca, has been appointed a member of the Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns & Children (ACHDNC) in the US Department of Health and Human Services.

The ACHDNC advisory committee provides advice, recommendations, and technical information about aspects of heritable disorders and newborn screening to Health and Human Services. The committee also works to develop policies and priorities that will enhance the ability of states and local health agencies to provide screening, counseling, and healthcare services for newborns and children who have or are at risk for heritable disorders. 

DeLuca tells newsstand.clemson.edu, “Being able to be part of this very important process is incredible. People take their cue from the ACHDNC for deciding which disorders to include in states’ screening panels. Each state screens for particular conditions, and I look forward to being able to help with those recommendations.”

DeLuca’s career started in genetics, working with infants identified with metabolic conditions as a result of newborn screening. Now a professor, she collaborates on research with the Greenwood Genetic Center and teaches genetics to undergraduate and graduate students. She also chairs the recruitment committee for the Clemson School of Nursing and is a member of the Women’s Commission at Clemson. 

To learn more about Jane DeLuca, an associate professor in the Clemson University School of Nursing who was been appointed a member of the Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns & Children in the US Department of Health and Human Services, visit here

Clemson University School of Nursing and Greenville Health System Open New Facility

Clemson University School of Nursing and Greenville Health System Open New Facility

According to the US Health Resources and Services Administration, South Carolina is projected to have a shortage of registered nurses by 2030. The shortage is expected to be more significant than in most other states, possibly topping 10,000 nurses.

Clemson University’s School of Nursing and the Greenville Health System (GHS) recently collaborated on a plan to address that shortage in the state of South Carolina through the opening of the Clemson University Nursing building. The building is an education and research facility that houses an expansion of Clemson’s baccalaureate nursing program at GHS, which opened in August.

Clemson’s new building allowed the School of Nursing to increase its first-year enrollment from 64 in fall 2015 to 173 in fall 2018. The university expects to increase total enrollment in the baccalaureate program to top 700 by 2021.

Kathleen Valentine, director of Clemson’s School of Nursing, tells Clemson.world, “The collaboration will not only expand our enrollment, but will also integrate teaching and clinical practice in innovative ways that will positively impact nursing education and patient outcomes.”

Nursing students at Clemson take their general education and nursing foundation courses on the main campus during their freshman and sophomore years. Then they are placed into one of two cohorts allowing students to complete their nursing courses in Greenville under the guidance of Clemson faculty and complete their clinical rotations at a GHS campus, or take their junior and senior nursing courses on Clemson’s main campus and complete their clinical rotations at health systems across the state, including GHS.

To learn more about Clemson Nursing’s partnership with Greenville Health System to open a new education and research facility, visit here.

South Carolina Hospital Association Awards Grants to Clemson University and University of South Carolina

South Carolina Hospital Association Awards Grants to Clemson University and University of South Carolina

The South Carolina Hospital Association (SCHA) has awarded Clemson University and the University of South Carolina (USC) individual grants in the amount of $25,000 to support the development of a high-quality healthcare workforce. The nursing schools were also offered the potential for two additional years of funding which will be determined based on an annual review.

Clemson’s School of Nursing received a grant of $25,000 from SCHA’s Indigo Enrichment Scholarship for its partnership with the Greenville Health System. The university plans to use the funds to help create interprofessional opportunities in the clinical learning environment.The $25,000 granted to USC went to the health services policy and management department of the Arnold School of Public Health. USC will use the funds to support students in the Master of Health Administration program.

Clemson School of Nursing Director Kathleen Valentine tells Newsstand.Clemson.edu, “We’re grateful for the South Carolina Hospital Association’s support of our efforts to ensure that our graduates are well prepared to work at the top of their license as a registered nurse. Through these funds, students will have increased access to experts in the fields of interprofessional teamwork, continuum of care, population health and community health.”

USC Master of Health Administration program director Bankole Olatosi says, “The SCHA scholarship will help the MHA program as it prepares students for positions to advance the provision of effective, efficient and equitable health services in South Carolina. Our students will benefit from the increased access to professional education available through conferences, meetings, and training to complement their education.”

The South Carolina Hospital Association is the leadership organization and principal advocate for the state’s hospitals and healthcare systems. The scholarship program is funded by SCHA Solutions, a division of the hospital association that partners with endorsed companies that provide workforce and operational services to state hospitals and health systems.

To learn more about the South Carolina Hospital Association’s $25,000 grants to Clemson University and the University of South Carolina, visit here.

Nutrition Pilot at Medical University of South Carolina Supports Changes in Health Habits for Nurses

Nutrition Pilot at Medical University of South Carolina Supports Changes in Health Habits for Nurses

A nutrition pilot was recently launched at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to give nurses support to change their health habits, allowing them to better care for their patients. Nurses often deliver health promotion education to patients, but when it comes to their own health habits, they often don’t take their own advice.

The pilot was prompted by multiple studies showing the need for nurses to implement healthier habits in their own lives. A 2011 study at the University of Maryland School of Nursing found that 55% of 2,103 female nurses surveyed were overweight or obese, while a recent survey of nurses at MUSC found that 75% of MUSC Health nurses reported putting their own health, safety, and wellness behind that of their patients. The MUSC study manifested results showing that nurses struggle with healthy eating, including eating less than the recommended daily amount of fruits and vegetables.

MUSC’s nutrition pilot helped the organization’s 2,700 nurses improve their healthy eating habits. Over the course of 60 days, the nurses tripled daily consumption of fruits and vegetables. After the pilot, 72% of nurses reported eating three or more servings of fruit and vegetables a day.

Efforts similar to this pilot have the potential to improve the health of the nursing workforce, as well as the health of patients who look to their healthcare providers for support and advice. Research has found that patients find preventative recommendations from healthcare providers who engage in healthy behaviors to be more credible and motivating

The pilot program was supported by Sodexo, a food and services facilities management company who is partnered with the American Nurses Association’s Healthy Nurse, Healthy NationTM Grand Challenge. The ANA initiative aims to improve the nation’s health by supporting nurses in changing their own health habits.

Bonnie Clipper, DNP, RN, MA, MBA, CENP, FACHE, vice president of Innovation at ANA, stated in a news release: “MUSC Health nurses’ willingness to participate in the pilot and also engage in the planning phase by sharing details about their nutritional habits is the sole reason it was a success. Pilots like this one and other innovative programs that target the nursing workforce are necessary to help create healthy nurses and – ultimately – a healthy nation.”

To learn more about the Medical University of South Carolina’s nutrition pilot to support healthier habits in nurses, visit here.

Clemson University Opens $31.5 Million Building to Help Alleviate Nursing Shortage

Clemson University Opens $31.5 Million Building to Help Alleviate Nursing Shortage

Clemson University recently announced the opening of a four-story $31.5 million building on the Greenville Health System (GHS) Greenville Memorial Medical Campus that will triple the number of students in the university’s nursing pipeline.

The building will enable Clemson and GHS to address the critical shortage of nurses in the state, and has already allowed Clemson to increase the size of its freshman nursing class. Clemson’s School of Nursing usually admits a class of 64 freshman each fall, but started this year with a class of 173 freshman.

South Carolina has been one of the states most affected by the shortage of nurses. However, Clemson’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program has seen significant growth in applications over the last ten years. In anticipation of the new building, the university has been bumping up nursing class sizes for two years. Total enrollment in the nursing program will increase from 256 in the fall of 2015 to 704 students as it reaches maximum capacity (when all four classes max out at 176 students).

The 78,000-square-foot facility will house junior and senior nursing students who are guaranteed the opportunity to do their clinical rotations at a GHS facility. The building is also connected to the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville by a two-story connector to foster interprofessional education.

To learn more about Clemson University’s partnership with Greenville Health System to open a new $31.5 million nursing building to help alleviate the nursing shortage, visit here.

Medical University of South Carolina Launches Nutrition Pilot to Improve Nurses’ Eating Habits

Medical University of South Carolina Launches Nutrition Pilot to Improve Nurses’ Eating Habits

The Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC Health) is launching a 60-day nutrition pilot intended to improve the eating habits of working nurses. MUSC Health nurses were hungry for healthier food options so they created a pilot program to give themselves new opportunities to increase their daily consumption of fruits and vegetables and improve their quality of life.

According to the American Nurses Association, the health of the average nurse is worse than that of the average American. A survey conducted at MUSC found that 75 percent of their nurses say they put the health, safety, and wellness of their patients before their own. Due to the demanding shifts and stress associated with nursing, nurses often put their own health and well-being last, especially their nutrition, despite their knowledge about prevention.

The pilot nutrition program offers fresh, seasonal, and locally sourced to-go food items available for quick pick-up at three locations on the MUSC campus. The pilot is supported by Sodexo Healthcare, a food services and facilities management company committed to improving quality of life. They are partnered with the Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation Grand Challenge (HNHN), an initiative of ANA Enterprise. MUSC is also an HNHN partner and the first organization selected to participate in an HNHN quality of life program in the US.

Andrea Coyle, MUSC Health Professional Excellence and Magnet Program director and registered nurse tells NursingWorld.org, “Our nurses impact the lives of their patients, colleagues, families, and neighbors every day. We had no reservations when we were approached to spearhead the pilot because the health of our staff is a top-priority. We are honored to work alongside Sodexo and ANA to offer more quality food options on our campus and serve as a model for other organizations.”

The outcomes and results of the MUSC nutrition pilot will be presented this fall. To learn more about the university’s pilot nutrition program to improve nurses’ eating habits, visit here.

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