COVID Insouciance Frustrates Frontline Nurses: “People Aren’t Listening to Us”

COVID Insouciance Frustrates Frontline Nurses: “People Aren’t Listening to Us”

As hospitalizations and deaths mount, nurses are losing patience with COVID-19 conspiracy theories and distorted libertarian mores that depict masking mandates as an infringement of personal liberty.

As Covid surges, nurses are becoming frustrated by anti-maskers and conspiracy theorists.

For frontline nurses tending to Covid patients who shunned masks or insisted on attending crowded gatherings, the situation is fraught with tragedy. South Dakota ED nurse Jodi Doering recently told CNN, “I think the hardest thing to watch is that people are still looking for something else and a magic answer and they do not want to believe Covid is real. Their last dying words are, ‘This can’t be happening. It’s not real.’” In North Dakota, Governor Doug Burgum pleaded, “You don’t have to believe in Covid, you don’t have to believe in a certain political party or not, you don’t have to believe whether masks work or not. You can just do it because you know that one thing is very real. And that’s that 100 percent of our capacity is now being used.”

“I want you to listen to health care providers and [what] your officials are telling you. I don’t want praise and I certainly don’t want to be your martyr.”

Tiffany M. Montgomery, PA Frontline Nurse

Nebraska ICU nurse Laci Gooch spoke out in a Twitter video: “We’re tired. We’re understaffed. We’re taking care of very, very sick patients and our patient load just keeps going up. We’re exhausted and frustrated that people aren’t listening to us.” Driving home after one night shift, Gooch passed a car festival packed with attendees blithely ignoring masking and social distancing, and “I was just shocked and it was infuriating. It just kind of feels like a slap in the face to all the hard work that we’re doing.”

Kentucky nurses, too, are “tired and frustrated” by the neglect of social distancing rules. Delanor Manson, of the Kentucky Nurses Association, told WLKY, “Some of the things that make it especially hard for [frontline nurses] is that they can’t get the vision of people dying out of their heads when they’re sleeping at night and when they’re at home with their families.”

There is irony as well. Despite being acclaimed as “healthcare heroes” around the globe, nurses feel doubly vulnerable when they go home to communities that frown on masking. “Wearing a mask won’t hurt you, but there’s the potential if you don’t wear a mask you may hurt someone else,” said Dr. Ruth Carrico, an infectious disease nurse and researcher with University of Louisville Health in Kentucky. In Pennsylvania, Tiffany M. Montgomery, a Drexel University postdoctoral research fellow who also works as a labor and delivery nurse, told the Morning Call, “I had no idea we would be doing it for this long and I’m just tired. I don’t want to be your superhero. I want to be safe. I don’t want to have to deal with this anymore. I want you to listen to health care providers and [what] your officials are telling you. I don’t want praise and I certainly don’t want to be your martyr.”

US Healthcare Systems Struggle to Cope With Fall Covid Surge

US Healthcare Systems Struggle to Cope With Fall Covid Surge

As Covid-19 cases spike all over the country, many healthcare systems are in desperate straits. States that proudly saw thousands of their nurses fly out this spring to “frontline” hotspots like New York City, Seattle, New Orleans, and Boston are now starved for resources themselves. With the latest stage of the pandemic coursing through 48 states, the frontlines are often in smaller cities and rural states that tend to lack the amenities common at metropolitian hospitals. Local and state health care systems are struggling to treat patients amid dire shortages of staff, beds, and equipment.

Under the strain of the present surge, healthcare systems are assigning non-Covid patients to beds in convention centers, hospitals are canceling elective surgeries, ICU nurses are working 60-hour weeks, and nurses who sped to New York in April are now working overtime to treat Covid patients in their hometowns. Areas that are especially overwhelmed, such as El Paso, store their dead in mobile cooling units staffed by jail inmates, and airlift non-Covid patients to hospitals in cities that for the present have escaped the new surge. In addition to seeking aid from National Guard medics, the American Hospital Association’s vice president of quality and patient safety, Nancy Fosterome, told Stat News that some hospitals are even turning to local dentists, Red Cross volunteers, and people with basic health experience to help with tasks that require less training.

In North Dakota, the weight of the Covid caseload—currently the worst in the country and, per capita, one of the worst in the world—has effectively broken the state’s contact tracing system. Kailee Lingang, a University of North Dakota nursing student now helping with contact tracing in the state, told the Washington Post that “Test and trace went by the wayside. Even if we had enough staff to call up everyone’s workplace and contact, there are so many new infections that it wouldn’t be as effective. At this point, the government has given up on following the virus’s path through the state. All we can do is notify people, as quickly as we can, that they have the virus.”

In Indiana, the state and local healthcare systems are sputtering in the wake of a 60% increase in hospitalizations. One doctor in the state, Timothy Mullinder, told MedPage Today that patients “who need to go to the ICU have been stuck in the ER for 24 hours because there are no beds available. Post-operative patients are stuck in the PACU recovery area well over 24 hours because there are no beds available.”

With the entire state out of staffed hospital beds, Iowa’s healthcare system is also overwhelmed. Whitney Neville, an Iowa nurse, told the Atlantic on November 13, “Last Monday we had 25 patients waiting in the emergency department. They had been admitted but there was no one to take care of them.” The strain on the system, combined with the state’s relaxed social distancing policies, prompted one infectious disease doctor to speak in near-apocalyptic tones: “The wave hasn’t even crashed down on us yet. It keeps rising and rising, and we’re all running on fear. The health-care system in Iowa is going to collapse, no question.” The problem, however, extends well beyond North Dakota, Texas, and Iowa. A November 17 Atlantic article found that 22% of all US hospitals are facing staffing shortages, and added, “More than 35 percent of hospitals in Arkansas, Missouri, North Dakota, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Virginia, and Wisconsin are anticipating a staffing shortage this week.”

At the center of the system, nurses and other healthcare workers are working as many shifts as they can, while doing their best to attend to waves of incoming patients. The latest surge, however, has driven a growing number of nurses to express their frustration with incoherent policies and public intransigence on the matter of masking, social distancing, and incredulity over the very existence of the virus. Michelle Cavanaugh, a nurse at the Nebraska Medicine Medical Center, spoke for many when she told a Utah reporter, “We’re seeing the worst of the worst and these patients are dying, and you go home at the end of the night and you drive by bars and you drive by restaurants and they’re packed full and people aren’t wearing masks. I wish that I could get people to see COVID through my eyes.”

New Psychiatric Mental Health Certificate Offered at SDSU

New Psychiatric Mental Health Certificate Offered at SDSU

The College of Nursing at South Dakota State University is now offering a postgraduate certificate program in psychiatric mental health. The certificate program, which was approved earlier in February, will begin courses in Fall 2019.

“We know family nurse practitioners assess for mental-health needs across the life span but are limited in treating the needs without the specialized certification,” Mary Minton, associate dean of graduate nursing for SDSU’s College of Nursing, told the SDSU Collegian. “The proposed certificate prepares graduates to provide much needed high-quality mental-health care in a variety of settings in rural and urban South Dakota. It increases much-needed access to psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners in our state where a serious shortage currently exists.”

The certificate was created to help with the shortage of psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners in South Dakota. A publication from the South Dakota Center for Nursing Workforce reports that while the state has over 1,100 certified nurse practitioners, only 3.3 percent of them are working in psychiatric mental health.

“This certificate will enhance the scope of practice for the nurse practitioner to provide more holistic health care,” Kay Foland, an SDSU College of Nursing professor, shared with the SDSU Collegian. “Persons needing health care more than likely to have a number of health concerns, including emotional and mental health issues. Completing the psychiatric mental health certificate will better prepare the family nurse practitioner to provide a more comprehensive, competent and evidenced-based practice level of care.”

There is a great need for psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners, in addition to more healthcare workers as the U.S. continues to suffer a nursing shortage. SDSU approved this certificate program to help address the shortage, so more nurse practitioners can work in outpatient clinics, primary-care units, private practices, community health and community mental health centers, and hospitals. They may also provide services in substance abuse programs, high-risk pregnancy centers, schools, prisons and trauma centers.

The certificate program is a part-time, 18-credit online program designed for advanced practice registered nurses, and family nurse practitioners, to complete in four semesters. For more information on the program, visit www.sdstate.edu/nursing/graduate-nursing/.

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