In celebration of Certified Nurses Day, we asked certified nurses why they chose to earn extra skills in particular areas of nursing and what their favorite parts are of being a nurse. We heard from quite a number. Thanks to all for your responses!

“I’m certified in adult critical care. I always saw certified nurses as those who’ve gone above and beyond in their profession to distinguish themselves among other cohorts as those who are driven, have the utmost competence in their skillset, and are knowledge seekers, and that is what I wanted to be.

I love the diversity in the patient population. I work with anyone from the age of 17 and beyond. I describe the value of certification to my coworkers as a distinguished honor; it’s something one works very hard to achieve, and while the journey may not be easy, it’s worth it. I tell my patients who ask what a CCRN is that it’s certification which shows individuals I am more than competent and capable to provide the best evidence-based care possible.”


—CPT Laura Wyatt RN, BSN, CCRN, a clinical staff nurse in the United States Army currently working at Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii

“I’m certified in Critical Care, Progressive Care, Nursing Education, Healthcare Simulation. I enjoy working in critical care because I find it rewarding to see patients make rapid improvements in response to my interventions. I appreciate the autonomy that this area provides, and I enjoy the low nurse-patient ratio because it provides me with opportunities to provide holistic nursing care and make deep personal connections with each of my patients and families.”

—Jodi Berndt PhD, RN, CCRN, PCCN, CNE, CHSE, College of Saint Benedict/Saint John’s University and St. Cloud Hospital in St. Cloud, Minnesota

“My first certification was the Pediatric CCRN, and I took the exam almost as soon as I had enough hours to qualify because I was so excited at the opportunity to become certified. Once I entered the role of unit-based educator in the Pediatric ICU and had enough hours in nursing professional development, I also became certified in Nursing Professional Development. After completing my MSN, I became certified as a Family Nurse Practitioner. Now that I primarily do research, writing, and teaching, my CCRN has been modified to a CCRN-K, a relatively new credential for nursing professionals who influence the care delivered to acutely/critically ill patients. In this role, I no longer have enough direct patient care hours to qualify for the original CCRN, and I was beyond ecstatic when I learned that AACN offered an option for nurse managers, educators, and those researching or teaching with the same patient population.”

—Alvin D. Jeffery, PhD, RN-BC, CCRN-K, FNP-BC, Post-Doctoral Medical Informatics Fellow (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Nashville, TN) & Education Consultant (Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH)

“I wanted to get a certification in nephrology to show my dedication to it. My mom was a dialysis nurse, so I’ve been around it since I was born. I picked nephrology because of the opportunity to take care of patients and their families in a different way than any other outpatient or inpatient fields.

You have to have hard conversations in nephrology, at times, and I love being part of that process as a patient advocate. I also love helping patients during difficult times and making them smile.”

—Kristin Brickel, RN, MSN, MHA, CNN, Director of Clinical Services at DaVita Kidney Care

“I currently have two certifications in infusion therapy: Certified Registered Nurse Infusion (CRNI) and Vascular Access Board Certification (VA-BC). I have spent most of my nursing career specializing in infusion therapy and the sub-specialty of vascular access. I initially was interested in certification purely for the educational opportunity, studying for my certification taught me a broad base of clinical knowledge.

I find infusion therapy to be extremely rewarding. It offers a near perfect mix of technical procedural excellence, while retaining the individual patient care that I value. Outpatient infusion therapy allows you to create a unique personal 1:1 connection with patients. Some of my best memories as an infusion nurse are the conversations I’ve had with these inspiring patients. In my role today, I get to apply my experience connecting with patients to my passion for improving care through research, education, and product design innovation that can help enable continued progress in care quality.”

—Kristopher Hunter BSN, RN, CRNI, VA-BC, Senior Technical Service Engineer, 3M Critical & Chronic Care Solutions Division

“I am a certified oncology nurse. I got certified because I wanted to be able to offer my patients the best care possible by staying on top of the rapidly changing knowledge base in cancer care and research. I find that being certified gives you a wider base of resources and opportunities to network with other oncology professionals.”

—Alene Nitzky, PhD, RN, OCN, CEO & Founder, Cancer Harbors and Author, Navigating the C: A Nurse Charts the Course for Cancer Survivorship Care

“I am now certified in hospice and palliative nursing. I knew the certification would enhance my professional skills. Earning the CPHN also gave me time to learn more about how hospice and palliative care has come to be seen globally, which is especially important because the patient population at MJHS Hospice and Palliative Care is as diverse as you’d imagine. I also appreciated the opportunity to better learn the ins and outs of the operations, insurance, and reimbursement processes.

I love my patients and my work. Contrary to what people think, being a hospice nurse isn’t depressing. Yes, it’s challenging and it’s hard to look into the face of a family member whose loved one is dying. However, it’s so rewarding to provide holistic care, help educate patients and families about what happens at the end of life, as well as to support people during a time when they really need it.”

—Neema Bandyopadhyay, RN, CHPN, RN Case Manager, MJHS Hospice and Palliative Care in New York City

“When I began my nursing career, I worked in OR and met the Chief of Surgical Oncology at Duke University. I transitioned to work on his surgical oncology team and felt that the additional Oncology Nurse Certification added credibility to my career. It also enabled me to move through administration into progressively more responsible positions, including Vice President.

As an OCN, I feel that effective national education in the U.S. is required to resolve the most difficult medical cases. Adult Oncology is a rewarding nursing genre. Patients need support in all aspects—mind, body, and spirit—in order to maximize benefit from their treatment regimens. Families also need support during this time which includes both medical education and emotional support.”

—Gail Trauco, RN, BSN-OCN, CEO, The PharmaKon LLC and CEO, Front Porch Therapy

Michele Wojciechowski

Michele Wojciechowski is an award-winning writer and author of the humor book Next Time I Move, They’ll Carry Me Out in a Box.

Latest posts by Michele Wojciechowski (see all)

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