Following the US Surgeon General’s call to action to end the national opioid epidemic through a movement called Turn the Tide Rx, the Duke University School of Nursing is taking steps to help promote it. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy launched the effort in August 2016, calling for healthcare providers to be educated on how to treat pain effectively without over-prescribing opioids and how to direct opioid users to alternate forms of treatment.

Opioid addiction has increased over the past 15 years, becoming a national epidemic. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 91 people per day died from opioid overdose in the US in 2016.

Duke’s School of Nursing is addressing the epidemic by hosting a discussion on how emergency healthcare providers can unite against opioid abuse.  Students from the accelerated bachelors of science in nursing (ABSN) program organized the event and hope it will be the first in a number of efforts to bring the Turn the Tide Rx movement to North Carolina.

The School of Nursing is focused on 21st century healthcare needs and preparing the next generation of transformational leaders in nursing. Two students from the ABSN program and members of Duke Emergency Nursing Students brought the idea for the Turn the Tide Rx discussion to the nursing Dean who was thrilled to support their idea. After being personally affected by the opioid epidemic, these students wanted to start spreading awareness and educating others on alternative pain management.

Turn the Tide Rx is a movement for the entire healthcare community, not just nurses. Duke is hopeful that their event will open up the conversations to begin reducing opioid abuse in North Carolina and across the country. To learn more about Duke Nursing’s efforts to end the opioid epidemic, visit here.

Christina Morgan

Christina Morgan

Assistant Editor at Daily Nurse
Christina Morgan is the Assistant Editor for
Christina Morgan

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