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Pediatric Nurse Practitioner: 8 Reasons to Consider this Career

If you want many of the same benefits and responsibilities of doctors without losing the things you love the most about nursing, then you’ll definitely want to consider becoming a pediatric nurse practitioner. These pediatric pros are unlike registered nurses because they have an advanced degree — typically a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) — and are able to prescribe medication, diagnose illness, and mentor patients and their parents. Because of this, NPs are stepping up as primary care providers in many corners of the globe, providing a solution to the primary care shortage and bringing quality care at a fraction of the cost.

1. Obviously…. The Kids!

According to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), only about 5% of NPs specialize in pediatric acute and primary care, while 60% specialize in family practice. That’s a pretty small number when you consider all the great benefits of working with kids. It also means that there’s a demand for NPs who specialize in pediatric care. But the best part about being a pediatric NP is that you get to make a difference in the lives of kids and their families. Oh yeah, and you get to wear fun scrubs!

In a patient satisfaction survey, nurse practitioners outscored physicians, suggesting that patients are happier with care administered by NPs. ­– Source

2. You’ll Be a Master

If higher education is your goal, then the NP route is for you! Nurse practitioners in any setting, whether they work in women’s health, mental health, or pediatric environments, must obtain an MSN, but pediatric nurse practitioners must also be certified by the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board. So not only will you have an advanced degree, you’ll have a specialized certification that will earn you respect in any health care setting. These credentials also earn you the privilege to prescribe medications, diagnose patients, and perform evaluations that are vital to pediatric care.

Nurse practitioner is ranked as one of the top 20 best-paying jobs for women, with a median yearly wage of $80,000 and a mean yearly wage of over $100,000. – Source

3. Money, Money, Money

Naturally, with a higher level of education and specialization comes a higher pay. According to the AANP, the mean salary for a full-time nurse practitioner in 2017 was $105,546. These competitive wages mean that the return on investment (advanced education) is pretty high compared with other medical professions. Because there is a shortage in primary care in the United States, many hospitals and medical systems will pay for full-time employees to become nurse practitioners.

4. It Keeps You on Your Toes 

The average nurse practitioner sees three or more patients an hour, so if you get bored easily, this field is for you. Just make sure you invest in some super-comfortable nursing clogs, because there’s a good chance you’ll be running around almost all day. Pediatric nurse practitioners are constantly seeking additional training and certifications since the field is ever-changing. There are also a wide range of environments where you can work and several different ways to advance in the field, so it never becomes stagnant.

According to U.S. News and World Report’s Best Job Rankings, nurse practitioners ranked number two for top health care jobs in 2017, just behind pharmacists. – Source

5. You Could Be Your Own Boss

As far as nursing careers go, nurse practitioners as a whole arguably have the most autonomy. But how much autonomy you have really depends on which direction you take your career — and there are many! Pediatric nurse practitioners are able to start their own private practices in some states. Currently, 22 states allow full practice authority, meaning NPs are able to practice without the supervision of a physician. The medical community is pushing for more autonomy for nurse practitioners throughout the U.S. to help address care shortages.

6. The Benefits Are Great

In addition to higher wages, nurse practitioners get some great additional benefits compared with registered nurses. If you choose to start your own pediatric practice, work as a school nurse practitioner, or work under a physician in a pediatric doctor’s office, then you’ll be able to take advantage of a regular 9 to 5 schedule. Of course, if you decide to start your own practice, you’ll have to pay out benefits to yourself and your employees.

The total tuition costs required to prepare a primary care nurse practitioner are less than the cost of one year of medical school. ­– Source

7. There’s a Great Demand

Did we mention the shortage of primary care in the United States? The AANP reports that the demand for pediatric nurse practitioners is constantly rising and that the role could help address a forthcoming physician shortage. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the professional will grow much faster than others, with an expected growth of 19% by 2020. Like any career in the medical realm, nurse practitioners are needed more in some areas than others. California, Texas, New York, Florida, and Pennsylvania have the greatest demand and hire the most nurses.

8. Job Security? Guaranteed

Of course, any profession that has a high demand will likely have a higher job security. That’s definitely the case for pediatric nurse practitioners. The most secure jobs in the current employment market are those that can’t be automated. Nurses as a whole are some of the most robot-proof jobs; As of right now, no robot or automated system would be smart enough, safe enough, or thorough enough to do the work that human caretakers do. So, for now, taking this career route is a totally safe bet.

Deborah Swanson

Deborah Swanson is a medical office professional with two decades of experience helping small practices and large hospitals alike improve efficiencies. She recently started consulting with allheart.com providing insight into the daily activities of medical professionals and how best to serve them.

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