You’ve read my thoughts on being a preceptor, but now it’s time to explore things from the other side: as an orientee. In the last two years, I’ve had the opportunity to orient as a student in nursing school, as a precepting practicuum student, and as a new graduate orienting to my current position in the NICU. It certainly doesn’t take much to channel these inner thoughts from what was not so long ago timewise, but feels like ages ago when I think back to where I was with my nursing skills. Here’s what I learned from the student experience.

1. I’m sorry for a lot of things.

“I’m sorry! I’m sorry! I’m sorry!” is all I can think. I’m sorry I didn’t remember to run a flush, I’m sorry I just kicked the back of your foot. I’m sorry! I know it’s annoying to keep apologizing, but I’m just very nervous and I’m sorry! I feel like I’m annoying you, I’m really worried you’re gonna tell my professor I did something wrong, and they’ll tell the hospital and then I won’t get hired and I won’t have a job! Point being, I’m a nervous wreck and I’m sorry I keep saying I’m sorry.

2. My preceptor is a bear tonight.

I get that it’s not always the most exciting gift to be given a student or a new grad to orient, especially when you’re not expecting it, or if your baby kept you up all night and you didn’t sleep, or if you had extensive plans to Facebook message and Tinder all day long. But… I’m here and I’m excited to learn…. and my preceptor is being a bear! If you could please try to not hate me and teach me something I would really appreciate it. Also, when you answer my question with an attitude I can’t help but feel like I shouldn’t ask any more questions, so please try to be understanding! P.S. We all know the look of a nurse that didn’t want a nursing student so please don’t think it’s not visible! Also, feel free to tell me to go sit at another computer while you’re charting if I’m not needed to help. Odds are that I want a break from you, too, and I could probably use some time to look things up!

3. I’m not as smart as I think.

I’m definitely not as smart as I think or act. I definitely don’t know all (or any) of the acronyms you’re using so please treat me like I know nothing and I can tell you if there’s something I’ve already learned. Further, please don’t leave me alone in a patient room while drawing labs off a central line for the first time (not that that’s happened to me or anything…). There will also be times when I’m acting like a know-it-all, but it’s probably just me overcompensating for realizing how little I actually know. If you work in a specialty unit, AKA anything other than med/surg, don’t forget that nursing school wasn’t focused on your specialty! So, no, I don’t know anything about your 23-week-old baby! Specialties are just that, specialties, so help me learn them!

4. These uniforms will never be less humiliating.

I feel like whenever anyone sees me in my student nurse uniform it’s a shout-out like “hey, ask me to come position your patient” or “I’m free to help transport patients—pick me!” When in reality, I’m here trying to learn. I do enjoy understanding that nursing isn’t all exciting procedures and numbers and diagnoses to learn; half the battle is balancing all of those things and still having time to turn your patients and meet their psychosocial needs, but my time is valuable and if I’m still in school I’m technically paying to be here, so I want to learn the skills I don’t know! Also, my uniform definitely does not mean that anyone can make jokes about what I don’t know or treat me like less of a person. I trust you and you are my guiding light for the day. Knowing that you have my back will help me relax and forget about the sign hanging around my neck that says “student”!

5. The elephant in the room: Lunch!

I promise it’s really OK if you don’t want to eat lunch with me. If you don’t and you do it out of obligation, I’ll know and feel uncomfortable, especially if it’s me, you, and eight of your friends all talking about your weekend plans that I’m not apart of. I’d honestly rather go eat with a fellow student at that point. Plus, I may be a vulnerable student, but I’m also an adult and can handle and enjoy eating on my own. And likewise, I’ll let you know if there’s a night when I really need to sit down with you and talk something through or talk about my experiences.

Ultimately, I’m stoked to be with you as a student, intern, or new grad. I look up to you, trust you, and likely want to be just like you. I know it’s hard having a student, but it’s hard to be one, too. Work with me so I can work with you. After all, nurses eating their young is so prehistoric, don’t you think?

Alicia Klingensmith

Alicia Klingensmith is a BSN Student at the University of North Florida.

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