University of Rhode Island College of Nursing Graduates First Class of Online RN to BSN Students

University of Rhode Island College of Nursing Graduates First Class of Online RN to BSN Students

On Dec. 20, the University of Rhode Island (URI) College of Nursing graduated 20 students from its online RN to BSN program. These students are “pioneers of a sort” as they were the first to graduate from the program which is the only online RN to BSN program in the state offered by a public university.

After the release of a 2010 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report recommending that 80 percent of nurses nationwide hold bachelor’s degree by 2020, there has been an increase in RN to BSN programs across the country. The IOM report included research indicating that patients have better outcomes when cared for by a nurse with a bachelor’s degree.

RN to BSN programs are designed to accommodate professional nurses who want to pursue bachelor’s degrees while still working. URI’s online program complements the traditional face-to-face RN to BSN program by allowing students to participate on their own schedule. The program includes intense courses that are covered in 7 weeks rather than the usual 13 week semester. Students are required to complete six nursing courses, statistics, pharmacology, and a public health practicum.

URI’s online RN to BSN program started in Fall 2015 with 30 students and now enrolls over 450 students from all over the country. The program is expected to continue growing as another 35 graduate this coming May.

Texas A&M University-Texarkana to Open New Traditional Four-Year Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

Texas A&M University-Texarkana to Open New Traditional Four-Year Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

Texas A&M University-Texarkana has announced that they are accepting applications for a new traditional four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program which will begin next year. The new program is being added to complement the already existing RN to BSN transfer degree program and Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program.

Texas A&M-Texarkana’s traditional BSN program is being opened partly in response to new recommendations from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) that the proportion of nurses with a bachelor’s degree increase to 80 percent by 2020. Further research from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) shows that baccalaureate and graduate prepared nurses are linked to lower mortality rates, fewer med ication errors, and positive patient outcomes.

The inaugural cohort at Texas A&M-Texarkana will accept 30 students, followed by a class of 35 students in the program’s second year, and 40 students the third year. Students in the program will be required to complete 120 credit hours, including 61 credit hours of prerequisite and core coursework and 59 credit hours of nursing courses. Clinical courses will take place in a state-of-the-art facility with high-fidelity simulation for practicing skills in the lab. For patient care experience, students will be placed in local hospitals and health care settings in the region.

In order to meet the needs of the new program, Texas A&M-Texarkana will receive $1.8 million in state funding over the course of 2016 and 2017 to expand its Nursing Department and support the regional medical community. The university also broke ground on a new Building for Academic and Student Services to house classrooms, skills and simulation labs, and faculty offices, expected to open in 2019.

Campbell University Welcomes Inaugural Nursing Class for 2016-17 Academic Year

Campbell University Welcomes Inaugural Nursing Class for 2016-17 Academic Year

Campbell University in North Carolina officially welcomes its inaugural cohort of 46 students in the Catherine W. Wood School of Nursing for the 2016-2017 academic year. This is a historic event for Campbell University after the program grew out of the state’s and region’s need for health professionals. The new nursing class will help advance Campbell’s mission to prepare servant leaders who make an immediate impact in the communities where they live.

Nursing classes will begin in the newly opened Tracey F. Smith Hall of Nursing & Health Sciences, located on Campbell’s Health Sciences Campus. The new facility is a 72,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art teaching facility designed for collaborative learning and team building while allowing students to experience the challenges and rewards of healthcare in a psychologically-safe environment.

Dr. Nancy Duffy, director of Campbell Nursing, says she is thrilled to throw away the idea of the three-hour lecture block and instead engage students in learning teams with active teaching strategies. Unlike most majors in university systems, Campbell Nursing won’t enroll students until they are juniors or have met all program requirements and fulfilled all program prerequisites. This is to ensure that nursing students have completed the general core curriculum so that they can focus on a rigorous nursing curriculum involving patient care and clinical experience during their junior and senior years.

Campbell doesn’t enroll everyone who completes the nurse requirements either. Students must apply for admission to Campbell Nursing, a process that includes a competitive, holistic application, in addition to interviewing with faculty members and writing a person essay. The school will accept a maximum of 50 students per academic year.

First-year and sophomore students interested in nursing can pursue a pre-nursing track, which the university started offering in 2014. It’s one of the most popular areas of study for incoming students and the new class includes 101 pre-nursing students.