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Alabama Nursing Graduates Begin Prestigious Vanderbilt Nurse Residency Program

Alabama Nursing Graduates Begin Prestigious Vanderbilt Nurse Residency Program

Two fall 2017 graduates of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) College of Nursing, Kate Bradley and Kristen Bertrand, have both been accepted into the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Nurse Residency Program. They will work in highly specialized health care areas, the cardiac and surgical units, respectively.

The Vanderbilt University Medical Center Nurse Residency Program is sponsored by the hospital and requires a two year commitment. Nursing graduates accepted into the program are considered full-time employees and eased into the role of professional nursing through hands-on clinical training.

Nurse residency programs are popping up across the country, helping new nurses to transition into professional practice. The nurse residency program offered at Vanderbilt University Medical Center offers a focus on delegation, time management, patient management, diversity, nursing quality and safety, research and evidence-based practice, and ethical decision making.

After completing the nurse residency program, Bradley plans to earn her Doctorate of Nursing Practice. Bertrand plans to gain clinical experience during her two-year residency, helping her to better plan her career path after working for a few years.

To learn more about Bradley and Bertrand, and the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Nurse Residency Program, visit here.

Vanderbilt School of Nursing Receives $1.2M Grant to Support Doctor of Nursing Practice Students

Vanderbilt School of Nursing Receives $1.2M Grant to Support Doctor of Nursing Practice Students

The Vanderbilt University School of Nursing recently received a $1.2 million grant from the US Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Nurse Faculty Loan Program to support Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) students who plan to become nursing faculty. The grant is designed to help increase the number of qualified nursing faculty in colleges and universities across the country.

Linda Norman, DSN, RN, FAAN, Valere Potter Menefee Professor of Nursing and Dean of the School of Nursing at Vanderbilt, tells Nursing.Vanderbilt.edu:

“The nursing profession is in the enviable position of experiencing increasing demand for nurses and seeing record numbers of students apply to nursing programs. Well-qualified faculty are needed to instruct and mentor those students. This loan forgiveness program encourages and equips doctorally prepared nurses to become effective faculty nurse scholars.”

DNP students who plan to teach are eligible to receive a NFLP award that underwrites tuition, books, fees, and other associated costs. Following their graduation, loan recipients who are employed as nursing faculty at any school of nursing in the United States for at least four years will have 85 percent of their loan forgiven. Students are then given a 10-year period to pay back the remaining 15 percent.

DNP students at Vanderbilt also take courses on nursing education as part of their overall coursework. This is because of the importance of increasing the number of doctorally prepared faculty in nursing programs across the country to better educate the nursing professionals of the future. 65 Vanderbilt DNP students graduated from the program last year, and more than 270 graduates have received the loan since its inception in 2008.

To learn more about Vanderbilt’s Doctor of Nursing Practice student grants, visit here.

Vanderbilt School of Nursing Breaks Ground on New Nursing Building

Vanderbilt School of Nursing Breaks Ground on New Nursing Building

The Vanderbilt University School of Nursing recently held a groundbreaking ceremony for the nursing school’s new $26.3 million expansion. With nearly 900 Nursing students currently enrolled, Vanderbilt Nursing is one of the largest graduate nursing programs in the country. The new building will accommodate more students and faculty, enhance learning, and allow for the advancement of nursing research.

With a five-floor building plan, the new facility will house technologically advanced classrooms, conference rooms, student services, and a state-of-the-art simulation teaching lab that allows for complex skills development and real-time feedback on students’ clinical skills. Designed to benefit students by centralizing services, the enhanced learning technology will help students better engage with faculty and peers.

The new building is also designed to allow for the advancement of nursing research by increasing the space currently available for faculty to conduct groundbreaking studies. Susan R. Went, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs tells News.Vanderbilt.edu,

“The number of nursing faculty actively engaged in research has grown significantly over the past five years. Nursing faculty are advancing their own discipline, as well as contributing to groundbreaking work across campus through collaborations with Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the School of Engineering and the Divinity School, to name a few.”

Vanderbilt’s new nursing building is expected to be completed in August 2018. To learn more about the building plans and groundbreaking ceremony, visit here.