The alarm goes off; you groan. How can it be time to get up already? You check the clock, hit the snooze button, and decide to skip breakfast in your head. You can eat something later—there’s no time.

Now that a new year is upon us, it’s time to renew some healthy habits. Many people resolve each new year to exercise more frequently or to eat healthier. I’ve got an easy suggestion for your nursing new year’s resolution: One of the best habits you can instill in your day is simply to eat breakfast before your shift.

As nurses, we know and can recognize the symptoms of hypoglycemia in our patients. But so frequently, the symptoms of low blood sugar are manifesting in ourselves and we don’t even notice. It is so important to eat breakfast, as it helps energize your morning, stabilize your blood sugar, and set you up for clear thinking and communicating at the beginning of a 12+ hour day.

Eating something in the morning is better than eating nothing, but some choices are better than others. The best breakfast choices are usually high in protein, fiber, heart-healthy fats, and complex carbohydrates. (And no, that mug of coffee doesn’t count as breakfast!)

Especially during winter, I urge you to try a bowl of oatmeal. Quick-cook oats take just two minutes to cook in the microwave, and they are so versatile. Try adding dried mango and shredded coconut, applesauce and cinnamon, or fresh fruit and Greek yogurt. Top with some raisins or nuts for added protein. Oatmeal is filling: it contains both soluble and insoluble fiber, which helps regulate your blood sugar and reduce your cholesterol levels. Even better, oatmeal is cheap! An entire canister of oats is usually less than $4 at the grocery store.

Oatmeal can be quick and easy to make and prepare (I set mine out the night before in a microwave-safe container, so in the morning I just add water and go), and I guarantee it will keep you full longer than that cup of coffee or berry smoothie. Overnight oats are a unique twist and make prep in the morning even faster. If you aren’t into hot cereal in the morning, try an oatmeal bar, the powerful effects of the oats are still available in bar form too, although be wary of excess sugars.

Whatever you grab as you walk out the door, make sure you’re setting yourself up for the best shift you can possibly have. Our job as nurses is hard enough without doing it on an empty stomach.

Laura Kinsella

Laura Kinsella, BSN, RN, CEN, is an emergency room nurse in Washington, DC.

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