Finding Joy in Everyday Nursing Tasks

Finding Joy in Everyday Nursing Tasks

There are certain aspects of every job that are, well, mundane. You know them, the repetitive and seemingly boring tasks that we are required to do but might not necessarily enjoy. It’s easy to get bogged down by these tasks or to even dread them, but it doesn’t have to be that way! It is possible to find joy in your everyday nursing tasks, from scrubbing the hub to priming IV tubing. Here are five suggestions.

1. Focus on the task’s purpose.

You may find yourself going through the motions at work while doing certain tasks that require less brain power. It’s easy to get frustrated by these tasks or have the desire to skip them on a day you aren’t feeling motivated. The next time you find yourself feeling this way, try reminding yourself of the purpose of the task. Why is it important that you do this? Who would be affected if you were to skip the task? Finding an underlying purpose will help you feel motivated and give you a sense of pride when you are finished.

2. Find a buddy.

Everything is better with a friend around! Working through the same routine tasks with a coworker can make things much more tolerable. For instance, if you dislike your morning charting, find a friend and do it together. Time will fly by when you have someone who can distract you and help you have a good time.

3. Change your mindset.

Apply the saying, “change your mindset, change your life” to your mundane work responsibilities and you’ll find that your entire day can be transformed. For instance, if you know that you dread the set up required for a certain procedure, make a mental choice to be excited and positive about it. Forcing yourself to think this way will improve your attitude about the task. It will be hard at first, but gradually you will find yourself feeling more positive and happy while at work.

4. Make a game out of it.

If there are several tasks at work that you dread doing, like patient admission paperwork, try making a game out of it. See how quickly and efficiently you are able to finish it. Each time you do a new admission, try to beat your last one. This will not only help you save time, but also help you feel a sense of accomplishment. Try creating a physical checklist of items that you need to chart; you will feel rewarded as you are able to check off each item on your list.

5. Savor a job well done.

Remember to enjoy the completion of every task that you perform. It doesn’t matter how small, large, easy, or hard the task was. No matter what, you finished the task and you did it well. Take pride in your work. Feel a sense of accomplishment and don’t be afraid to compliment yourself on a job well done. Thinking to yourself, “Wow, that was the fastest IV start of my career!” or “Man, I just did the best dressing change!” will help you appreciate the importance of these everyday nursing tasks.

How to Deal with a Traumatic Situation at Work

How to Deal with a Traumatic Situation at Work

At some point in every nurse’s career, they will experience a traumatic situation such as a hemorrhage, code blue, or even the death of a patient. It is important to know how to deal with the aftermath of this type of event so you can begin the healing process. Failing to take care of yourself or pushing away emotions could lead to burnout and potentially end your nursing career. Here are a few tips on how to process and recover after a traumatic situation at work.

1. Debrief with your coworkers.

During an emergent situation, your perception of the events that took place may be skewed due to adrenaline and anxiety. It is important to take time to debrief with others who were involved in the situation with you, so you can begin to process the situation. As you discuss how everything unfolded and begin to understand everyone’s role in the event, you will be able to process what happened. Be sure to address any questions or concerns you have about how or why things occurred the way they did.

2. Take time off from work.

After experiencing a stressful situation at work, ask yourself how you are feeling about returning to work for your next shift. If you are feeling anxiety or dread, it might be a good idea to take some time off. Talk to your managers about these emotions and see if they can help you to arrange some time off. Having time to process your emotions and refresh yourself will help prevent burnout.

3. Spend time with loved ones.

It is important to spend time with the people you love most after a traumatic event. You may not be able to discuss the details of what happened due to HIPAA, but you can express how you feel emotionally. Your loved ones will be able to comfort you and provide you with the support and space you need to begin healing.

4. Practice self-care.

It is always important to practice self-care, but it becomes absolutely necessary to do so after the emotional and physical stress of a traumatic event. Check in with yourself about the emotions you are feeling and what could help you to process and relieve them. For example, if you are feeling overwhelmed or anxious, try going on a walk or doing a workout you enjoy. If you are feeling physically or mentally exhausted, try getting a massage or taking a nice, warm bath.

5. Seek professional help.

In some cases you may not be able to work through the aftermath of a traumatic event on your own. It is perfectly normal to need additional help from a therapist. Ask your employer if they have reduced cost or even free therapy sessions for employees needing assistance.

It is important to remember that you are not alone and that at some point, every nurse has struggled in the aftermath of a traumatic event. Every day it will get easier and one day you will wake up and feel completely healed.

14 Things Every Nurse Should Have in Their Pocket

14 Things Every Nurse Should Have in Their Pocket

If you ask any nurse what their favorite thing is about wearing scrubs (besides the fact that they are basically PJs), they will most likely say “pockets!” Scrub pockets hold all of the essential tools that a nurse needs to survive a shift. If you’re a student or a new nurse, you might not know yet exactly what you should keep in your pockets. So here is a list of 14 pocket nursing essentials:

1. Pens and highlighters

You can never have enough pens! Highlighters are also a great tool to use if you want to mark important information about a patient on his or her chart.

2. Gum

Nurses get up close and personal with lots of people, so fresh breath is a must.

3. A snack

Maintain your blood sugar and be prepared for those busy days when you may not be able to get a break!

4. Notepad

While a paper towel or scrub pants will work for jotting down vital signs, sometimes it is nice to have paper.

5. Stethoscope

Whether you choose to keep your stethoscope around your neck or in your pocket, a stethoscope is an absolute must for a nurse.

6. Lip balm

Hospitals are cold and dry. Coat your lips in lip balm to prevent the inevitable chapping.

7. Tape

Between taping up IVs and blood draw sites, you’ll certainly use a lot of tape throughout the day.

8. Alcohol swabs

Chances are, regardless of your nursing field, you will deliver at least one IV push med each shift. Make patient safety easy by keeping alcohol swabs handy.

9. Watch

There may not always be a clock in your patient’s room. A watch is essential for taking vital signs as well as knowing how many hours before your shift ends.

10. Scissors

Be the hero on your unit by having scissors. Put your name on them to prevent other nurses from holding onto them.

11. Pen light

Pen lights are not only good for neuro assessments; they also make great lights for charting at night in a patient room or finding a pill you dropped on the floor.

12. IV flushes

Save yourself time when giving medications or maintaining a line by having your IV flushes always at your side.

13. Hair ties or bobby pins

Avoid getting your hair in body fluids by having a hair tie or bobby pins in your pocket.

14. Hand lotion

After the 100th time washing your hands, your hands will be screaming for moisture. Keep your hands soft and happy with a small tube of lotion.

What do you like to keep in your scrub pockets? Comment below!

5 Unique Ways to Practice Self-Care

5 Unique Ways to Practice Self-Care

We all know how important it is to practice self-care when you have a stressful job like nursing. Meditation and exercise are wonderful ways to refresh your mind and body, but maybe you’ve found yourself getting bored with these activities. Step out of your comfort zone and try something new with these five unique ways to practice self-care.

1. Hydrotherapy Floating

During a hydrotherapy float session, you will float effortlessly in a 94-degree tub thanks to 1,000 pounds of Epsom salts. Floating can help reduce stress, ease chronic pain, and enhance mindfulness. While floating you can either let your mind wander or have a blissful meditation session. Either way, at the end of your float, you will feel relaxed and ready to take on anything that comes your way.

2. Acupuncture

Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese practice that uses tiny needles to stimulate different points on the body. It may not sound very relaxing to be poked with needles, but if you’re brave enough to give it a try, you won’t regret it. Your acupuncturist will begin by placing several needles on your body based on your concerns, such as headache or stress relief. Once the needles have been placed, you will be left alone to relax and listen to soothing music. After the needles have had time to work their magic, they will be removed and you will be amazed by how much better you feel.

3. Massage

Nursing is a very physically demanding job that can leave you with tight, achy muscles. Massage is a great way to relax and relieve any built-up tension. There are several different types of massage you can try, like hot stone, deep tissue or Swedish. Each massage appointment is customized to the client’s specific need in terms of pressure, intensity and location. Let your massage therapist know if you have any areas that you would like them to focus on, like your shoulders, calves or lower back after a long day at work.

4. Hot Yoga

Hot yoga is exactly what it sounds like—the practice of yoga in room heated to 95-105 degrees. During your yoga practice, you are encouraged to focus on your breathing and let each inhale and exhale guide you to a new pose. Your stress will begin to drip away as your mind is cleared of any lingering thoughts about your day at work. If you’re worried about hot yoga being too intense, many studios offer warm yoga, which will provide the same benefits but in a cooler room.

5. Chiropractic Alignment

Being on your feet for long hours or hunching over a computer screen doing charting can cause some serious spinal misalignment. Spinal misalignment can lead to back pain, knots, sore muscles and even headaches. A chiropractor can straighten out any pains you are having (literally), and advise you on how to protect your spine and prevent further injury. After a few cracks here and a few pops there, you’ll feel like a completely new person.

5 Habits That Will Help You Become a Great Nurse

5 Habits That Will Help You Become a Great Nurse

We all know a great nurse—someone whom we look up to and wish we could be like one day. These nurses didn’t start out as role models. They had to work hard to become who they are today. The good news: You, too, can become a great nurse! Here are five habits to incorporate into your nursing practice that will help you along the way.

1. Review your charting.

Take a few minutes at the end of your shift to review your charting for the day. You may find a mistake or remember something you forgot to chart. It’s important to remember that everything you type could be reviewed in a court of law. If something wasn’t charted, then it didn’t happen. By reviewing your charting, you are protecting your nursing license and ensuring an accurate medical record for your patient.

2. Remember your safety basics.

Don’t forget the safety basics you learned in nursing school, like wearing gloves or scrubbing the hub. These practices will protect you from occupational hazards and protect your patients from harm. Over time, your safety basics will become habits that you will be able to maintain even when you are busy or stressed.

3. Keep up with the latest information.

Every day a plethora of new information is released into the nursing world. It is crucial that you stay up to date on everything in your field of nursing so you continue to grow and evolve. Nurses who are behind the times and unwilling to change their practices could endanger themselves and their patients. Join your local professional association and read your hospital and unit newsletters to stay abreast of new information specific to your field of nursing.

4. Stay organized.

It is easy to become overwhelmed and disorganized when you are taking care of several patients. A great nurse is always thinking three steps ahead of what she is doing. Find an organizational system that works for you to help plan your day, or use a checklist to ensure that you get everything done. Having a system in place will help you stay on track when an emergency happens in the middle of your shift.

5. Don’t cut corners.

It may be tempting to cut corners to save time, but safety measures were put in place for a reason. By skipping a step, you could be risking your patient’s life. Maintaining sterility or performing the five rights of medication administration may be time consuming but could be disastrous if skipped. Infection, sepsis, overdose, or allergic reaction are all possible outcomes. Protect your patients, yourself, and your license and don’t cut corners.

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