Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts Nurses Association Approve New Contract

Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts Nurses Association Approve New Contract

Three years after their dispute began, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Massachusetts Nurses Association (MNA) have reached an agreement and approved a new two-year contract deal. The union representing Brigham and Women’s hospital supports over 3,400 nurses who accused the hospital of putting profits ahead of patient care.

In 2016, nurses from Brigham threatened a historic one-day strike. Both sides ultimately reached a contract deal to avoid the strike the day before it was set to begin what would have been the largest walkout of nurses in state history. Prior to the strike being called off, Brigham had planned to lock out the striking nurses for four additional days by hiring temporary replacements and transferring hundreds of patients to other facilities.

The nurses union has continued to clash with other hospital executives since then, carrying out a strike at Tufts Medical Center in 2017 and pushing a controversial ballot question to regulate nurse staffing levels in hospitals in 2018, which was rejected by voters.

The new agreement shows a drastic change in attitude from all sides. Contract negotiations between Brigham and the nurses association had reached a bitter point prior to the cancelled strike in 2016. But this time around, the talks were very different and all sides can take part in celebrating a new agreement between the two organizations.

Brigham and Women’s Hospital released the following statement following the new contract deal: “The process of negotiations was collaborative and respectful as the hospital and the MNA worked to achieve our mutual goal: ensuring that nurses have a safe, supportive environment in which to provide the best care for patients.”

The new contract will take place retroactively to last October and expire in September 2020. The deal includes a 12 percent raise over two years for nurses in their first 19 years on the job and a 4.5 percent increase for nurses at the top of the wage scale. The contract also maintains pensions and other existing benefits.

To learn more about the new two-year contract deal between Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Massachusetts Nurses Association three years after avoiding a historic strike, visit here.

Penn State Forensic Nurse Researcher Jocelyn Anderson Works to Support Sexual Assault Victims

Penn State Forensic Nurse Researcher Jocelyn Anderson Works to Support Sexual Assault Victims

Jocelyn Anderson, a forensic nurse and researcher at Penn State University, found her calling in the field of forensic nursing after completing her final nursing practicum in a South African intensive care unit (ICU). During her time there, she primarily witnessed two types of violence—physical and gun violence, and sexual assault violence. Oftentimes, the victims of sexual assault would come into the ICU after attempting suicide following their attack.

Forensic nursing has emerged as a discipline to help curb the harmful effects that sexual assault victims face. The International Association of Forensic Nurses defines forensic nursing as the practice of nursing globally when health and legal systems interact. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the field of forensic nursing is expected to see a 26 percent growth rate over the next decade.

Originally from a rural community in Minnesota, Anderson had never been exposed to this kind of violence before. She had been introduced to forensic nursing during her training but she wasn’t aware of the opportunities the field had to offer until her time spent in South Africa led her to enroll in a forensic nursing graduate program to help victims recover from sexual assault trauma.

After earning a nursing degree, there are several forensic nursing certificate programs and graduate programs available in the field. After completing these programs, graduates serve as the first line of treatment to victims. Individuals with training in forensic nursing can also become sexual assault nurse examiners (SANEs), which are nurses specializing in domestic violence, child abuse nurses, death investigators, legal nurse consultants, and more.

After completing her graduate degree, Anderson worked at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center as a forensic nurse. Her role also involved helping patients who wanted to seek criminal justice for the crimes committed against them. She provided patients with interventions, such as evidence collection and photo documentation, and collaborated with law enforcement officials and attorneys to facilitate prosecuting these sensitive cases.

Anderson tells news.psu.edu, “As the forensic nurse responding in these hospitals, we were responsible for providing both forensic and medical care to those patients after a sexual assault. The physical impacts as well as the mental ones on these patients were the two main aspects we focused on right when they entered through the door.”

The field of forensic and sexual assault nursing is relatively new but it is already proving to help provide better care for victims of sexual assault trauma. Research examining these programs has shown that patients who received care from a specifically trained forensic or sexual assault nurse after an assault were more likely to be given the appropriate care and medication and more likely to have a sexual assault kit collected correctly. Therefore, they are also more likely to have their criminal case moved forward and the traumatic experience will be lessened.

To learn more about Jocelyn Anderson, a forensic nurse and researcher at Penn State University who helps support sexual assaults victims and serves as an advocate for advancements and growth in the field, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Linda Davis Retires from 35-Year Career as a Cardiac Registered Nurse

Nurse of the Week: Linda Davis Retires from 35-Year Career as a Cardiac Registered Nurse

Our Nurse of the Week is Linda Davis, 57, who recently retired from her 35-year career as a registered nurse in a cardiac rehab program. Over the course of her career, Davis touched a lot of hearts, sometimes literally. She spent 25 of her 35 years as a registered nurse in the cardiac rehab program of Washington Adventist Hospital in Takoma Park, MD. She also spent many of those years running the program.

Davis had been thinking about retiring for some time, and realized on June 27 this year that it was the 25 year anniversary of when she began working at Washington Adventist Hospital. She took it as a sign that it was time to retire.

Davis tells washingtonpost.com, “I’ve had people ask me, ‘Isn’t it boring to do the same job for so long?’ I always say no, because it’s something I believe in.”

Davis’s career working for a cardiac rehab program was inspired by her first job as a nurse at Washington Hospital Center where she dealt with a variety of patients. After a few years on the job, telemetry was introduced to the hospital, which gives healthcare professionals the ability to monitor a patient’s vital signs remotely.

Telemetry introduced Davis to the intricacies of the heart, and she found the jagged lines of its rhythms sketched on paper and computer screens fascinating. In 1994, she decided to join the cardiac rehab program at Washington Adventist to work with patients as they recovered from their heart attacks. Now her job involves working with patients who are recovering from a heart attack by leading them through gentle exercise and counseling them on diet and relaxation.

To learn more about Linda Davis, who recently retired from her 35-year career as a registered nurse in a cardiac rehab program, visit here.

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Appoints Kimberly McIltrot to Lead Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Appoints Kimberly McIltrot to Lead Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON) has appointed Assistant Professor Kimberly McIltrot, DNP, CPNP, CWOCN, to serve as director of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program.

JHSON Dean Patricia Davidson, PhD, MEd, RN, FAAN, tells newswise.com, “This leadership position is key to the future of our program and to leveraging the importance of advanced practice nursing across the nation. As a JHSON DNP graduate herself, Dr. McIltrot is an exceptional leader in advanced clinical care, patient safety, and translating evidence into practice. I look forward to her knowledge and experience guiding our program’s continued excellence and growth.”

McIltrot has served in a variety of leadership programs throughout her career. In her time at JHSON, she co-led the first Saudi Arabian DNP class to graduate from the school in 2017. She has served as chair of the DNP Progressions Committee, co-investigator of an NSPII grant funding JHSON’s Supporting Professional Achievement in Nursing (SPAN) program, and as an instructor for numerous courses within the DNP program. She was also the lead nurse practitioner in pediatric surgery at the Johns Hopkins Hospital for several years.

Earlier in her career, McIltrot was an officer in the Army Nurse Corps and a charge nurse in the 41st Combat Support Hospital in Iraq, the Brooke Army Medical Center in Ft. Sam Houston, and Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC. She has received military awards for her service including the Bronze Service Star for her work in Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm/New Dawn.

To learn more about the newly appointed director of the JHSON DNP program, Dr. Kimberly McIltrot, visit here

Washington State University Health Sciences Students Learn Team Approach to Opioid Addiction

Washington State University Health Sciences Students Learn Team Approach to Opioid Addiction

Washington State University (WSU) Health Sciences Spokane is teaching students in its medicine, pharmacy, and nursing programs how to care for patients suffering from opioid addiction. A two-hour class developed by faculty at the university will teach teamwork and communication to provide an effective approach to treatment for these sensitive patients.

The Washington Department of Health funded the development of the program. Almost 350 students from WSU and Eastern Washington University took the class in January and February. WSU will eventually be making the curriculum freely available online to any university that wants to offer the curriculum to its health sciences students and a follow-up grant will allow the university to adapt the material for use by rural health clinics. 

Barbara Richardson, PhD, RN, an associate clinical professor in WSU’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, tells news.wsu.edu, “We know that a lot of times when patients run into problems with opioids its because there’s poor communication on the health care team. People can fall through the cracks; our goal is to build a system where the cracks don’t exist.”

The curriculum on how to create a team approach to opioid addiction covers roles and responsibilities, appropriate language, and conveying patient information to other members of an interprofessional healthcare team. To learn more about Washington State University’s new curriculum for teaching a team approach to opioid addiction to health sciences students, visit here

March Of Dimes Awards 2019 Graduate Nursing Scholarships to Nurses in Field of Mom and Baby Health

March Of Dimes Awards 2019 Graduate Nursing Scholarships to Nurses in Field of Mom and Baby Health

March of Dimes recently awarded its 2019 March of Dimes Graduate Nursing Scholarships to three exceptional nurses for post-graduate and doctoral studies in the field of maternal-child nursing. March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit for the health of moms and babies, and they announced the 2019 scholarships at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM).

Stacey D. Stewart, President and CEO of March of Dimes, tells prnewswire.com, “Congratulations to these remarkable nurses for their outstanding commitment to the health of moms and babies in their communities. March of Dimes is proud to help these nurses continue their education at this important stage of their careers. With our graduate nursing scholarships, we also help ensure that more moms and babies around the nation will get the highest quality care.”

The scholarship recipients include:

Noelene Jeffers, a registered nurse and certified nurse midwife from Washington, DC. Jeffers is a current Robert Wood Johnson Future of Nursing Scholar at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland. She has worked in underserved communities in the DC area for several years and her goal is to become a nurse-midwife scientist who utilizes research to understand the multifaceted nature of maternal and infant health disparities found in communities of color in the United States and improve them.

Emily Johnson, a registered nurse pursuing a Master of Science degree in nursing at the University of New Mexico, with a specialization in midwifery. Johnson served in the Peace Corp from 2011 to 2013, educating young women on health and advocating for women’s rights. She has also spent time as a perinatal doula for underserved women in the Baltimore area, and as a labor and delivery nurse and lactation consultant on the Navajo and Fort Apache Reservations. Johnson has developed an understanding of how intergenerational trauma, poverty, unresolved grief, and other stressors that Native American communities have faced predisposes them to increased rates of prematurity and poorer health outcomes.

Heidi Young-Blackgoat, a registered nurse pursuing a Master of Science degree in nursing at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, with specializations in midwifery and women’s health nurse practitioner. Young-Blackgoat has a range of experience with patients and families in the maternal health spectrum.  She has provided care for babies in the NICU affected by maternal prenatal substance use and worked extensively with vulnerable populations such as teens and immigrants who did not learn English as their first language. She has focused her career on addressing the poor morbidity and mortality rates among women of color.

March of Dimes leads the fight for the health of all moms and babies by supporting research and providing education and advocacy so that every baby can have the best possible start. Applicants for the March of Dimes Graduate Nursing Scholarships must be registered nurses currently enrolled in a graduate program in maternal-child nursing at the master’s or doctoral level and a member of the ACNM, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWONN), or the National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN). Applications for the 2020 scholarships will be available in September 2019 on the March of Dimes website.

To learn more about March of Dimes recipients of the 2019 March of Dimes Graduate Nursing Scholarships, which were awarded to three exceptional nurses for post-graduate and doctoral studies in the field of maternal-child nursing, visit here.

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