NYU College of Nursing Receives $1.9 Million Grant to Establish Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations

NYU College of Nursing Receives $1.9 Million Grant to Establish Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations

The New York University (NYU) Rory Meyers College of Nursing has been awarded a $1.9 million, five-year grant from the National Institute for Nursing Research (NINR) to establish the NYU Meyers Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations.

According to NYU.edu, the new center will be designated to developing a team of nurse scientists dedicated to studying metabolic syndrome and related chronic conditions, their biological mechanisms and modifiable risk factors, and the best interventions to reduce or eliminate the burden of multiple chronic conditions in diverse, vulnerable adult populations.

Metabolic syndrome is a set of interrelated health conditions present in 35 percent of the US population that puts individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Common factors that comprise metabolic syndrome include hypertension, insulin resistance, and obesity. Genetics and the environment can play a role in metabolic syndrome and its related chronic conditions.

Precision health will be the focus of the Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations, which embraces a personalized approach to health by considering the factors unique to an individual and is emerging as a strategy for preventing and managing chronic diseases.

Jacquelyn Taylor, the Vernice D. Ferguson Chair of Health Equity at NYU Meyers and co-principal investigator for the Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations, tells NYU.edu, “The new center will extend nursing science by truly examining the uniqueness of individual and environmental level factors that influence health outcomes—including those related to genomics, biomarkers, lifestyle, and environmental factors—and can inform more individualized care for diverse populations at risk for multiple chronic conditions and/or resultant metabolic syndrome.”

To learn more about NYU Nursing’s $1.9 million grant to establish a new Center for Precision Health in Diverse Populations, visit here.

Columbia University Names Lorraine Frazier New Dean of the School of Nursing

Columbia University Names Lorraine Frazier New Dean of the School of Nursing

Columbia University recently announced that Lorraine Frazier, PhD, RN, FAAN, has been named the new dean of the School of Nursing, the Mary O’Neil Mundinger, DrPH Professor of Nursing, and senior vice president at Columbia’s Irving Medical Center. Frazier’s appointment is effective September 1, 2018, succeeding Bobbie Berkowitz, PhD, RN, FAAN.

Lee Goldman, MD, Dean of the Faculties of Health Sciences and Medicine and Chief Executive, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, tells Newswise.com, “We are delighted to welcome Dr. Frazier to the Columbia University School of Nursing. Dr. Frazier’s remarkable depth of experience will help us advance the role of nursing practice in an increasingly complex health care landscape. As we welcome her to Columbia, I also want to express my personal as well as institutional gratitude to Dean Bobbie Berkowitz, whose extraordinary leadership over the past eight years has positioned the school for even greater success in the future.”

Dr. Frazier is joining Columbia from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston where she is professor and dean of the School of Nursing. After completing her PhD there in 2000, Frazier joined the faculty in 2002 then rose to professor, associate dean, and chair of the Department of Nursing Systems in 2008.

Frazier is a national expert in biobanking, the emerging science of collecting, storing, and sharing blood and tissue samples for the purpose of advancing medical research and providing access to genetic information. Dr. Frazier served as director of the UTHealth Biobank and project director for TexGen, a biobank consortium involving academic institutions in the state of Texas.

To learn more about Dr. Lorraine Frazier and her appointment as dean of the Columbia University School of Nursing, visit here.

Columbia University School of Nursing Launches Palliative Care Program

Columbia University School of Nursing Launches Palliative Care Program

The Columbia University School of Nursing has launched a comprehensive palliative care program for students of all levels that integrates the basic principles of palliative care into the curriculum. The program reflects the recent development of competencies and recommendations from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). The AACN is encouraging palliative care education for nursing students as the healthcare industry begins bracing for an unprecedented number of Americans who will be living with one or more chronic illnesses.

Marlene E. McHugh, DNP, assistant professor of nursing at Columbia University, tells Newswise.com, “We are reaching a moment of crisis in the United States as more and more people, especially older Americans, are living with serious illnesses and experiencing impairments in their quality of life, from pain issues to loss of function and depression. Providing every health care professional with the basic tenets of palliative care is crucial to meeting the needs of these patients.”

Palliative care focuses on the person rather than the disease, emphasizing meeting the needs of patients and families, and easing suffering. The area of palliative care includes end-of-life care and addresses the physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and spiritual needs of people with a serious illness.

“As palliative care providers, we talk to patients about what they value, what their goals are, and what their understanding is of their medical illness so that they can make decisions about next steps,” says Mary Ellen Tresgallo, DNP, assistant professor nursing at Columbia Nursing.

Columbia Nursing’s program includes a series of six End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) modules developed in partnership with the AACN. Completing the program provides entry into palliative and end-of-life care subspecialties that are available for advanced students.

To learn more about Columbia Nursing’s new palliative care program, visit here.

University at Buffalo Invites Dementia Expert to Speak on Caring for Rapidly Aging Population

University at Buffalo Invites Dementia Expert to Speak on Caring for Rapidly Aging Population

The University at Buffalo (UB) has invited Ann Kolanowski, internationally renowned expert on dementia and complex care needs of the elderly, to speak on caring for the nation’s rapidly aging population during the UB School of Nursing’s 21st Annual Bonnie Bullough Lecture.

Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the healthcare costs associated with care for patients with dementia takes its toll on the economy. Dementia affects more than 5 million Americans, roughly 1 in 10 people age 65 and older. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, the number of people diagnosed with the disease is expected to triple by 2050.

Kolanowski will present “The Challenge of Delirium in People Living with Dementia,” an exploration of the differences between delirium and dementia, and caring for people with both conditions. Her presentation is the keynote event of the School of Nursing’s 6th annual Research Day, which unites scholars across Western New York to discuss and share advancements in the study of pressing health care issues.

Yu-Ping Chang, PhD, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Endowed Professor and associate dean for research and scholarship in the School of Nursing, tells Buffalo.edu, “Having Dr. Kolanowski as a speaker for this year’s event is not only relevant to the community, but is important for our school’s students and mission. Nurses often provide the front-line health care for older adults. Along with nurse scientists, they have been leaders in elder care and will continue to play increasingly critical roles in the care for older adults in the decades ahead.”

With no cure or effective treatment for dementia currently available, there is an urgent need for research that will improve health and financial outcomes for people living with these diseases, their families, and society.

To learn more about Kolanowski’s presentation at UB Nursing on caring for our rapidly aging population, visit here.

University at Buffalo Nursing Faculty Receive Funding for Interdisciplinary Research Projects

University at Buffalo Nursing Faculty Receive Funding for Interdisciplinary Research Projects

Two faculty members from the University at Buffalo (UB) School of Nursing have received awards to help fund interdisciplinary research projects in the areas of access to health care for low-income cancer patients and weight loss following bariatric surgery.

Darryl Somayaji, PhD, assistant professor in the UB School of Nursing, received a $50,000 grant from the UB Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) Pilot Studies Program to lead an investigation of health outcomes for lung cancer patients and survivors on Medicaid. The CTSI Pilot Studies Program provides funding to nursing faculty to help advance new technologies and treatments from conceptual stage to clinical study.

Somayaji’s study will look at health care patterns to determine if guidelines for timely diagnosis and treatment are being met, and if access to care has an impact on patient mortality. Her research will help improve health care models and inequalities in care that Medicaid-insured individuals diagnosed with cancer often face.

Laura Anderson, PhD, licensed psychologist and assistant professor in the UB School of Nursing, was awarded the Innovative Micro-Programs Accelerating Collaboration in Themes (IMPACT) grant from the UB Office of the Vice President for Research and Economic Development for $30,000. Her award will support investigations of factors behind excessive weight regain following bariatric surgery, a complication that occurs in more than 40 percent of patients.

Yu-Ping Chang, PhD, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Endowed Professor and associate dean for research and scholarship in the UB School of Nursing, tells Buffalo.edu, “We are very excited that two of our faculty received funding to further develop their programs of research. Both of their studies are inter-disciplinary and translational in nature, and are addressing significant clinical problems directly related to patients’ health and health care delivery.”

To learn more about the innovative research being conducted by UB Nursing faculty, visit here.

Nurse of the Week: Nurse Manager Joan Riggs Earns Healthcare Achievement Award for Elder Care Initiative

Nurse of the Week: Nurse Manager Joan Riggs Earns Healthcare Achievement Award for Elder Care Initiative

Our Nurse of the Week is Joan Riggs, RN, who was recently awarded a Health Care Achievement Award for her advocacy and work in hospital-based quality and safety initiatives for elder patients. The award was granted by the Long Island Business News (LIBN) whose Healthcare Achievement Awards honor individuals and organizations in the healthcare industry for outstanding leadership, service, and innovation.

Riggs currently works as a Nurse Manager at South Nassau Communities Hospital in Long Island, NY, which has been designated as a NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Health System Elders) hospital as a direct result of Riggs’ work on caretaker education and healthcare center around elder patients. Following a NICHE conference in 2015, Riggs developed and spearheaded a hospital-wide initiative to advance care for elder patients at South Nassau. Since the program began, over 20 registered nurses have completed geriatric certification or become geriatric resource nurses.

NICHE is an international program based out of the NYU College of Nursing that provides principles and tools to stimulate a change in the culture of healthcare facilities to achieve patient-centered care for elder patients. The NICHE network includes over 680 hospitals and healthcare organizations in the US, Canada, Bermuda, and Singapore.

Riggs joined South Nassau in 2010 as the Nurse Manager of the Medical Surgical Telemetry Unit. With 31 professional years in healthcare, Riggs has spent her career working in surgical intensive care and trauma units. Now she’s using her expertise to improve elder care for hospital patients at South Nassau.

To learn more about Joan Riggs and her Healthcare Achievement Award for her efforts to improve elder care, visit here.

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