New BSN Degree Through University of Dayton and Sinclair Community College

New BSN Degree Through University of Dayton and Sinclair Community College

The University of Dayton and Sinclair Community College have joined forces to provide a new bachelor of science in nursing degree, in order to help meet the four-year credential requirement that more and more health care employers are mandating.

The new degree program is designed for students to start their coursework at the University of Dayton in their first year. In the second and third years, students are dually enrolled at Dayton and Sinclair, balancing nursing courses and clinical rotations. At the end of the third year, students will complete their ASN from Sinclair, before moving on to year four at Dayton to complete their BSN. Additionally, after gaining their ASNs, students will be allowed to work as licensed registered nurses through the National Council Licensure Examination.

“The bachelor of science in nursing offers students an affordable pathway to a high-quality degree,” said UD School of Education and Health Sciences Dean Kevin Kelly. “The program draws on the strengths of both institutions, including UD’s Marianist tradition of educating the whole person and Sinclair’s long and excellent reputation in nursing education, and helps meet a critical workforce need in the Dayton community.”

As the nursing shortage continues, more degree program options like the one designed by the University of Dayton and Sinclair Community College are crucial. The Bureau of Labor Statistics is predicting a 15 percent job growth for registered nurses through at least 2026. With RNs needed in hospitals, extended care facilities, schools, and other organizations, it is critical to increase more education and certification options for those planning to become nurses.

“Employers in our region appreciate the caliber of the Sinclair nursing graduate, but also place value on registered nurses having a BSN degree,” said Rena Shuchat, Sinclair College Health Sciences dean. “Sinclair and UD have a long-standing partnership and this is another example of two great institutions partnering to provide our region with high-quality nurses with an advanced degree.”

This program is especially helpful for those wanting to pursue a BSN but concerned about costs. Sinclair tuition costs are locked in for years 2 and 3 of the program, and students are locked into a transparent net-tuition plan through the University of Dayton for years 1 and 4. Beyond the financial benefits, students will be able to seek academic help from faculty at both schools. These BSN candidates will also be working alongside UD and Sinclair students in other health science degree programs, providing them with a well-rounded education that will assist them as they begin their RN careers.

For more information on this new degree program, visit the University of Dayton’s website.

New Psychiatric Mental Health Certificate Offered at SDSU

New Psychiatric Mental Health Certificate Offered at SDSU

The College of Nursing at South Dakota State University is now offering a postgraduate certificate program in psychiatric mental health. The certificate program, which was approved earlier in February, will begin courses in Fall 2019.

“We know family nurse practitioners assess for mental-health needs across the life span but are limited in treating the needs without the specialized certification,” Mary Minton, associate dean of graduate nursing for SDSU’s College of Nursing, told the SDSU Collegian. “The proposed certificate prepares graduates to provide much needed high-quality mental-health care in a variety of settings in rural and urban South Dakota. It increases much-needed access to psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners in our state where a serious shortage currently exists.”

The certificate was created to help with the shortage of psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners in South Dakota. A publication from the South Dakota Center for Nursing Workforce reports that while the state has over 1,100 certified nurse practitioners, only 3.3 percent of them are working in psychiatric mental health.

“This certificate will enhance the scope of practice for the nurse practitioner to provide more holistic health care,” Kay Foland, an SDSU College of Nursing professor, shared with the SDSU Collegian. “Persons needing health care more than likely to have a number of health concerns, including emotional and mental health issues. Completing the psychiatric mental health certificate will better prepare the family nurse practitioner to provide a more comprehensive, competent and evidenced-based practice level of care.”

There is a great need for psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners, in addition to more healthcare workers as the U.S. continues to suffer a nursing shortage. SDSU approved this certificate program to help address the shortage, so more nurse practitioners can work in outpatient clinics, primary-care units, private practices, community health and community mental health centers, and hospitals. They may also provide services in substance abuse programs, high-risk pregnancy centers, schools, prisons and trauma centers.

The certificate program is a part-time, 18-credit online program designed for advanced practice registered nurses, and family nurse practitioners, to complete in four semesters. For more information on the program, visit www.sdstate.edu/nursing/graduate-nursing/.

New Florida Bill Aimed to Help State Nursing Shortage

New Florida Bill Aimed to Help State Nursing Shortage

Technical schools have been lobbying Florida state legislators so more students can become registered nurses. As a result, Florida House Bill 381 is under review with the Florida House of Representative’s Higher Education and Career Readiness Subcommittee. Language from the bill states that it would “…[authorize] school district career centers to conduct certain associate degree nursing programs.”

Manatee Technical College is leading the charge on this movement with support from Florida Association for Career and Technical Education. Currently, MTC offers a licensed practical nursing program, but technical schools cannot offer RN programs. If passed, the new legislation will allow Florida technical schools and centers to provide transition programs, where students who complete the licensed program can continue their education. This path could create more opportunities for students to take the state exam and become registered nurses.

“We’re not trying to compete with the state college,” MTC spokeswoman Maura Howl shared with YourObserver.com. “We’re trying to offer our graduates an opportunity they currently don’t have. It’s all about career pathways — to give students stepping stones to progress.”

Florida anticipates that there will be nearly 114,000 openings for registered nurses from 2017 through 2023. The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity lists nearly 3900 of those openings within Manatee and Sarasota counties alone.

Keeping Up Nurse Recruitment Efforts

With Florida feeling the nursing shortage, healthcare employers, like Tidewell Hospice, are grateful for more opportunities for nursing students to become registered nurses. Presently, Tidewell has 17 open positions for registered nurses and seven open positions for licensed practical nurses. Cindy Coffman, Vice President of Human Resources at Tidewell, said some roles were posted over four months and have not received any applications.

“None of us can fill the job openings,” Coffman told YourObserver.com. “The applicant volume isn’t there. We’re really feeling it at this point.”

Tidewell has taken several steps to fill its nursing roles, including social media campaigns, hiring a nurse recruiter, and increasing bonuses. Lakewood Ranch Medical Center, another Manatee-Sarasota healthcare provider, has also been using new strategies to keep their nursing positions filled. LRMC Chief Nursing Officer Judy Young explained how the organization offers clinical rotations to local nursing schools, as well as a 12-week residency program.

“We’ve taken these creative steps to really embrace existing and potential new RNs coming into our program,” Lakewood Ranch Medical Center’s Director of Marketing Lisa Kirkland told YourObserver.com. “We’re trying to stay one step ahead of the nursing shortage issue.”

As of January 30, the bill is under review with several education subcommittees. If approved, it will go into effect on July 1.

Participate in our 2019 Nursing Career Survey!

Participate in our 2019 Nursing Career Survey!

Calling all nurses! Springer Publishing Company has launched the 2019 Nursing Career Survey, and we want to hear from you!

This study is designed for professional nurses and nursing students in every stage of their careers. Springer Publishing Company is surveying nurses to find out more about your professional paths, academic achievements, and leadership goals.

We are interested in learning about what steps you take and what tools you use to further your career, whether you’re just starting out or you’re thinking about pursuing a specialty. Your feedback will help us determine how we can better serve you and your needs in your nursing careers.

As always, there’s a perk for participating and helping Springer Publishing Company report the most up-to-date nursing career data. Survey participants will be entered to win one of five $25 Amazon gift cards!

Click here now to participate in the survey. We look forward to hearing your responses!

Veteran Luis’s VA Nursing Career Lets Him Serve Other Veterans

Veteran Luis’s VA Nursing Career Lets Him Serve Other Veterans

Luis considered going to work at a private-sector hospital following military service. But he chose a career as a nurse at VA, in part after benefiting from the care and comradery of VA.

“Being a Vet myself, I would like to influence how other Veterans are taken care of and the overall environment,” Luis says in a video. “I felt more comfortable here, so I think I can contribute more here.”

Luis’s story is a reminder that many Veterans choose VA healthcare careers for the chance to work with and care for others who have served and use their military skills in a civilian job.

“While in the service, I was a hospital corpsman,” he said. “My service, I feel, just carried on from there.”

Choose VA to advance in nursing

Veterans like Luis have flourishing nursing careers at VA, by applying skills learned in the military and by taking advantage of the many opportunities for continuing education and professional development.

VA is the nation’s largest employer of nurses, with programs in student employment, residency and orientation and nursing education scholarship programs such as the National Nursing Education Initiative (NNEI).

“Whether nurses are LVNs (licensed vocational nurses) or RNs (registered nurses), they can move up,” said Marlene Brewster, associate director for Nursing and Patient Care Services at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System in another video.

NNEI supports nurses like Luis with obtaining baccalaureate and advanced nursing degrees such as bachelor’s, master’s and Doctor of Nursing Practice from an accredited education program.

Luis is getting his bachelor’s degree through the initiative. After graduation, he plans to study for a master’s degree, he said.

Choose VA today

“There’s a lot more benefits here than you might see on first glance,” he said.

Luis chose a VA nursing career to care for other Veterans and to learn and grow on the job.

This story was originally posted on VAntage Point. 

Depressed Nurses Make More Medical Errors

Depressed Nurses Make More Medical Errors

Employee Well-Being Becomes Patient Safety Issue

Many years of research has shown that depression among registered nurses is extremely common. One study published last year showed that RNs suffer from depression at almost twice the rate of people in other professions.

Now, new research is linking depression among nurses to a significant uptick in medical errors.

The study, published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, analyzed survey responses of 1,790 U.S. nurses. It found that 54% reported poor physical and mental health. About one-third said they had some degree of depression, anxiety, or stress, and less than half said they had a good professional quality of life.

Researchers also found that about half the nurses reported medical errors in the past five years. When researchers compared the wellness data to the medical error data, they saw a significant link between poor health, particularly depression, and medical errors. In fact, nurses in poorer health had a 26% to 71% higher likelihood of reporting medical errors than did their healthier peers.

Depression stood out as a major concern and the key predictor of medical errors, the researchers said.

“Hospital administrators should build a culture of well-being and implement strategies to better support good physical and mental health in their employees,” lead author Bernadette Melnyk, dean of The Ohio State University’s College of Nursing and chief wellness officer for the university, said in a statement. “It’s good for nurses, and it’s good for their patients.”

Melnyk noted several steps hospitals and health systems could take toward creating “wellness cultures for their clinicians,” including limiting long shifts and providing easy-to-access, evidence-based resources for physical and mental health, including depression screenings.

The issue of clinician wellness has gotten increasing attention recently. For instance, the National Academy of Medicine just launched an effort to combat clinician burnout and mental health issues called the “Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience.”

However, there’s a stigma around mental healthcare among clinicians, as evidenced by studies and research into physician mental health. One study in the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine found that state medical boards ask physicians much more extensive and intrusive questions about mental health conditions than for physical health conditions, and many of those questions violated the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Fearing stigma, punishment, and loss of their license, physicians often don’t report their mental health struggles and don’t seek treatment. In addition, up to 15% of physician suicide victims did not receive mental healthcare.

This story was originally posted on MedPage Today.


Gain a better understanding of the current state of the US health care system and how it might impact your work and life.

You have Successfully Subscribed!