Survived Covid, Aced Her NCLEX: Nurse of the Week Chelsie Turrubiartez, RN is Hard to Stop.

Survived Covid, Aced Her NCLEX: Nurse of the Week Chelsie Turrubiartez, RN is Hard to Stop.

Brand-new RN, Nurse of the Week Chelsie Turrubiartez didn’t allow anything to stand between her and her dreams of becoming a nurse. Over the course of nine eventful months, the 23-year-old Adel, Georgia resident was hospitalized for Covid, graduated from the School of Nursing at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, passed her NCLEX, and found an RN position at the hospital where she’s worked since high school as a nurse extender. “It’s like a nurse’s aide,” she explained. “I have always wanted to be a nurse, and now it feels really good to be able to do that.”

In March 2020, as much of the world was locking down and healthcare workers found themselves on the “frontlines” of the pandemic, Turrubiartez was busy studying, attending classes at ABAC, and looking forward to graduating with her class. Then, on the very last day of March, she was hospitalized for Covid and began fighting for her life. “The ventilator was on max setting,” she told the Albany Herald. “They put me in the ambulance, and I had to be on my stomach the entire way. I don’t remember the ride at all. I was out of it.” Her condition started to improve in late April, and Turrubiartez was finally able to go home on May 4, 2020. She hadn’t seen her family since March 31, had missed her last month of school, her eagerly anticipated virtual graduation ceremony, and, well, you do not simply bounce back after spending weeks on a ventilator in the ICU.

Turrubiartez received her associates degree from ABAC, and plans to enroll there for her BSN as well.

As she recovered from her frightening ordeal, ABAC gave Turrubiartez the opportunity to repeat her spring semester coursework that fall and graduate on December 3, 2020. “I was really happy when I graduated!” she said. “I didn’t think I would get a chance to do that.” Adding to her happiness that day, during the pinning ceremony, Turrubiartez received the Lisa Purvis Allison Spirit of Nursing Award and a scholarship check for $500. She followed that up by passing her NCLEX, and then, Southwell Tifton Hospital hired their former nurse extender to work as an RN on their general medicine surgical floor.

Now—with some help from that scholarship check—Turrubiartez is planning to study for her BSN as well. For more details on her story, visit here.

Still “Glad to be a Nurse” Despite Furloughs and Fears? A Look at Medscape’s 2020 Job Satisfaction Survey

Still “Glad to be a Nurse” Despite Furloughs and Fears? A Look at Medscape’s 2020 Job Satisfaction Survey

The Medscape 2020 nurse job satisfaction survey dove into fears, PPE woes, and other highs and lows of life in the workplace during the pandemic. Medscape surveyed 10,400 nurses across all regions of the US and analyzed responses from 5130 RNs, 2002 NPs, 2000 LPNs, 500 clinical nurse specialists (CNS), 401 nurse-midwives (NMs), and 391 CRNAs. Most respondents fell within the 35-54-year-old age group.

Despite the hardships of 2020, most respondents are still quite happy with their choice of career. A full 98% of NMs and CRNAs are glad they chose nursing, closely followed by 96% of CNS, 95% of LPNs and NPs, and 93% of RNs.

Given the chance of a do-over, though, some are not sure they would make the same choice. 85% of NMs and CNS say they would pick nursing again. Among RNs and CRNAs, 76% and 78% would stick with nursing.

The Impact of Covid-19

Among CRNAs, 73% have treated Covid-19 patients. Midwives came in second, with 60% of NMs saying they had treated Covid patients, followed by NPs (57%), RNs (53%), LPNs (50%), and CNS (38%). Have they had sufficient PPE? Responses were almost evenly divided, with a majority of LPNs (59%) and RNs (56%) affirming that they have enough PPE.

Who was furloughed? CRNAs were at the front of the line, with 34% saying they had been furloughed during the pandemic. NPs came in second, at 18%, followed by LPNs (15%) and RNs (14%). On average over 30% of the nurses surveyed lost income last year, but CRNAs took the biggest hit, with 59% saying they lost money in 2020.

Telehealth is becoming routine for nurse-midwives and NPs. In the 2020 survey, 77% of NMs and 75% of NPs told Medscape that they met with patients online or by phone, and 53% of the LPNs surveyed made virtual visits.

Fears and worries during this scary year were to be expected, of course. Nurses’ greatest concerns during the pandemic were concentrated on the fear of transmitting Covid to family and oneself, but 38% singled out the discomfort of wearing extra PPE as their main woe, and 23% worried most about higher patient loads.

Best and Worst Parts of the Job

Asked about their main source of job satisfaction, nurses offered a range of answers, but helping people and making a difference in their lives was the top choice for RNs, LPNs, and APRNs (click charts to enlarge).

Sources of job satisfaction among RNs and LPNs in 2020

Least satisfying aspect of the job: Workplace politics ranked first for RNs and LPNs at 23% and 21% respectively, and for 26% of CNS’s. LPNs also pointed to their paychecks as a source of dissatisfaction.

See the full report on Medscape.

Pediatric ICU Travel Nurses: Pack Your Suitcases! NurseFly Cites 313% Jump in Demand

Pediatric ICU Travel Nurses: Pack Your Suitcases! NurseFly Cites 313% Jump in Demand

Is the job market for pediatric travel nurses on the rebound after the initial Covid slump? Where is demand spiking—and what should your paycheck look like? In this interview with DailyNurse, NurseFly founder Parth Bhakta answers these questions and describes the current job market for pediatric travel nurses (this is the first part of a two-part story. Next week, a PICU nurse describes her unit’s experience during the pandemic and offers tips for pediatric travel RNs).

DailyNurse: Can you give us an overview of the current job climate for travel pediatric RNs?

Parth Bhakta: “Pediatric ICU (PICU) RNs are in increased demand across the US, especially as we see an uptick in flu and COVID cases in school-age children. In fact, from August to September this year, NurseFly recorded a 313% jump in demand for PICU RNs, which suggests they are becoming overwhelmed with an influx of patients and not enough nurses to schedule.

“We’re seeing [pediatric travel nurses] respond to increased demand in hot spots across the country, from New York to Houston to Los Angeles and every state in between.”

Parth Bhakta, CEO, NurseFly
Pediatric ICU travel nurses are in demand
Travel pediatric nurses are needed all over the US.

Of course, COVID has changed the travel nursing landscape — at least for the time being — forcing nurses to rethink how they approach their assignments. Before the pandemic, travel nurses were choosing locations based on their interest in the city or nearby activities. Now, we’re seeing them respond to increased demand in hot spots across the country, from New York to Houston to Los Angeles and every state in between.

Hospital needs have been incredibly difficult to predict with fluctuating patient censuses and overwhelmed staff. Temporary healthcare staffing platforms like NurseFly help solve this urgent staffing crisis by connecting travel nurses with staffing agency partners and hospitals to meet urgent needs more quickly and effectively (NurseFly fills positions 80% faster than traditional staffing methods).

We anticipate hospitals and healthcare systems will get more comfortable with digital transformation during the pandemic out of necessity and will look to evolve their traditional recruitment model to quickly backfill positions and meet potential future crisis demand. Ultimately, this is a win for travel nurses who will be able to review and apply to even more job postings in real-time for a seamless candidate experience that supports a fast hiring process.”

DN: Is the increase in demand for RNs to work as pediatric ICU nurses part of an ongoing pattern, or has there been a sudden shortage since the pandemic?

Bhakta: “The pediatric ICU RN shortage is part of an ongoing pattern. NurseFly’s data highlights how PICU nurse demand peaked in March, at the start of the pandemic, and dropped nearly 79% in April. This is likely because of the COVID-related volatility and its impact on health systems. Near the start of the pandemic, it was thought that children were largely unaffected by the coronavirus, and within months, there were studies that confirmed they could be impacted just as severely as adults.

We saw demand for PICU travel nurses start to return slowly in July, and now in October, we’re seeing nearly 10 times the demand over the lowest point in May. The rebound at least partly comes from health facilities reopening, and potentially indicates a spike in COVID-infected kids.”

Demand for pediatric travel nurses is on the rise again, following an initial drop at the start of the pandemic.

[Click to view at full size; click Back to return to story]

Demand for pediatric travel RNs is back on the rise. (Chart: NurseFly)

DN: In what locations are PICU travel RNs most in demand right now?

Bhakta: “NurseFly data from October shows that the states with highest demand for pediatric ICU RNs are Texas, California, and Washington DC. The fastest growing need for PICU RNs from September to October are Texas and North Carolina, with a 179% and 87% increase in demand respectively.

PICU RNs typically see increased demand during winter months because of normal complications (illness, accidents), and that will be exacerbated this year as a result of COVID.

DN: What is the current pay for traveling PICU RNs, and where can you find the best pay packages?

Bhakta: “Despite a fluctuating demand for travel pediatric ICU RNs across the country, average pay for travel PICU RNs has remained relatively stable for the last year, at roughly $1,800-$1,900 per week.

Further, hospital and health systems in Idaho, Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Kentucky and California are paying traveling PICU RNs the most on average, with the highest weekly packages paying up to $3,874 in New York and $4,500 in Pennsylvania.

This granular level of pay transparency is critical to travel healthcare workers during the pandemic and beyond, and creates more efficiencies for all RNs when the time comes to look for a new contract. However, 51% of employers don’t make salary information available to early-stage candidates, only 22% say they’re likely to start sharing that information within the next five years. That will be a crucial area of the healthcare recruitment process to improve as the demand for travel pediatric RNs and other roles continues to increase.”

DN: What makes travel nursing an attractive choice for so many nurses?

Bhakta: “Travel nurses are an excellent option for health systems that need to quickly fill staffing vacancies. The position is attractive to those early on in their RN careers, or with as much as 30 years’ of experience. Travel nurses choose their positions based on a variety of factors, such as lucrative pay packages, proximity to their family, wanting to live in a new location, or pursuing other hobbies and interests. It often combines nurses’ wanderlust with their commitment to patient care.”

Who’s on Top? Nursing Sites Release 2020 RN Program Rankings

Who’s on Top? Nursing Sites Release 2020 RN Program Rankings

The emergence of fall is a cue for annual Best-of lists, and RegisteredNursing.org and NursingProcess.org have obliged by releasing their 2020 rankings for the best RN programs. You can use the links below to access more details on the ranking lists or click on the name of a school to learn more about the top training grounds for RNs in 2020-2021.

NursingProcess.org: Best Associate Degree RN Programs for 2020

On NursingProcess.org, the judges consulted data from the National Center for Education Statistics, state Board of Nursing websites, and official school websites to select the best associate degree programs. Rankings are based on assessments of academic quality, first-time NCLEX-RN pass rates, school reputation, and affordability. To see full descriptions of each program in an area, click the region heading (e.g., Northeast, Midwest, etc), or see the complete list on NursingProcess.org/best-nursing-schools… Clicking the name of a school will take you to the website for that school’s nursing program.

Northeast
  1. Anne Arundel Community College – Arnold, MD    
  2. Northampton Community College – Bethlehem, PA
  3. Hagerstown Community College – Hagerstown, MD
  4. Community College of Beaver County – Monaca, PA
  5. Manchester Community College – Manchester, NH
Midwest
  1. Washington State Community College – Marietta, OH
  2. State Fair Community College – Sedalia, MO
  3. Century College – White Bear Lake, MN
  4. Manhattan Area Technical College – Manhattan, KS
  5. Oakton Community College – Des Plaines, IL
Southeast
  1. Northwest Florida State College – Niceville, FL
  2. Hopkinsville Community College – Hopkinsville, KY
  3. Orangeburg Calhoun Technical College – Orangeburg, SC
  4. Chattahoochee Technical College – Paulding, GA
  5. Arkansas Northeastern College – Blytheville, AR
Southwest
  1. Mesa Community College – Mesa, AZ
  2. Laredo Community College – Laredo, TX
  3. Eastern New Mexico University – Roswell, NM
  4. Austin Community College – Austin, TX
  5. Blinn College – Brenham, TX
Western Region
  1. Western Nevada College – Carson City, NV
  2. Chemeketa Community College – Salem, OR
  3. Sierra College – Rocklin, CA
  4. Pierce College – Puyallup, WA 
  5. Saddleback College – Mission Viejo, CA

RegisteredNursing.org 2020 Top Programs by State

The 2020 RegisteredNursing.org Best RN Program rankings are based on NCLEX-RN test results. The site obtained NCLEX-RN exam pass rates for all RN programs (ADN, BSN, Direct-Entry MSN) state by state “through several methods, including making a number of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests.” To see the top-ranked schools in a given state, click the state name to access the list and descriptions of each program.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Scope of Practice: A Firsthand Account from the RN Criticized by Dr. Pimple Popper

Scope of Practice: A Firsthand Account from the RN Criticized by Dr. Pimple Popper

Social media can be a fantastic way of keeping in touch or sharing information, but it can also be a hotbed of controversy. Elizabeth Hanes, an RN who now works as a journalist, unexpectedly experienced this herself, when Dr. Sandra Lee, also known as “Dr. Pimple Popper,” recently commented on a story Hanes had written.

Hanes took the time to talk with us about her experience.

Exactly what happened? Please explain.

On Saturday, June 20 (I believe), Dr. Lee tweeted a link to my WebMD article (from the WebMD Twitter account). The social media people at WebMD had written social sharing text that said, “What’s the difference between sunburn and sun poisoning? A registered nurse explains.” Above this, Dr. Lee wrote, “Why would a registered nurse explain this? Why not a dermatologist?” and included an eyeroll emoji.

The nurses of Twitter did not respond well to that. The thread had, I believe, thousands of comments. I never saw the original post; I only saw the “apology” post, which also has been deleted.

Were you surprised at what Dr. Lee, aka Dr. Pimple Popper, posted? Why or why not?

I was taken a bit aback. My first thought was, “Why wouldn’t a registered nurse explain this?” This is well within the scope of what nurses do on a daily basis. My second reaction was pure amusement. I guess I will have to say I thought it sounded petty.

Many nurses responded—some were angry and even called for the cancellation of her show. Do you think that a lot of health care professionals don’t understand the nurse’s scope of practice? What about people who don’t work in health care?

I think there were two issues here. First, that many people don’t understand nurses’ scope of practice. Second, that people don’t understand how journalism works. It feels strange to have to write out that a nurse’s scope of practice includes patient education. Our entire profession is built, in fact, on the foundation of teaching patients about their bodies, about wellness, about disease, etc. To me, patient education is the essence of nursing practice. So for someone to sort of call that into question felt baffling.

But people also seemed very unclear on how journalism works. They seemed to believe that only subject matter experts should be reporters. But journalists aren’t required to be subject matter experts, themselves, because journalists know how to conduct research to find the facts they need to write a story. Sometimes that research involves interviewing subject matter experts—like a dermatologist. In this case, the process did not include interviews. That’s just how it goes in journalism.

Do all nurses educate their patients as a part of their routine care?

Yes, absolutely. All nurses engage in patient education on a daily basis. Or family education. In fact, nurses are the health educators of the world. That’s not to say physicians don’t also educate. Of course they do. But physicians often provide patient education at a high, over-arching level. For instance, an oncologist may explain to a patient what chemotherapy does, but the oncology nurse will be the one educating the patient and his or her family members about the effects of chemotherapy, how to cope with those effects, how to set up the home environment to best care for a person receiving chemotherapy—and on and on. Doctors don’t do that. Nurses do.

Why do you think it’s important for the masses to understand that nurses are fully qualified to provide health education?

I think most people turn to nurses first for health education on an interpersonal level. They do this without even thinking about it because nursing is the most trusted profession. My experience has been that people, in general, highly value nurses and their knowledge.

I think there’s a bit of a disconnect when it comes to media and reporting. For instance, during the kerfuffle with Dr. Lee, some people on social media directly questioned my background and credentials—was I really qualified to write this article. When members of the public do this, it does not offend me. In fact, I wish more people would engage in this sort of critical questioning of stories in the media. When they see a celebrity offering an opinion on some topic—let’s say it’s how COVID-19 spreads—I wish more people would ask themselves, “But what do actual epidemiologists say?”

It’s a different story when a doctor or fellow nurse or another health care professional questions my credentials—and in public, no less. These people should know that patient education of all kinds—including articles on WebMD—falls well within the scope of nursing practice. It’s disrespectful to question that or to imply that it does not.

What can nurses do to get the word out about this? Or does it need to come from higher up, like health care and/or nursing organizations? Or both?

I would like to see two things happen:

  1. I would like to see more journalists requesting nurses as sources for their health reporting.
  2. I would like to see more nurses become health reporters.

To the first point, I wish that more health journalists would understand that nurses play a different role in patient care than doctors do, and that their stories would be much enriched if they included the nursing perspective along with the physician’s.

Imagine a news story about a new cancer treatment that not only includes quotes from the researcher about the chemistry involved and quotes from a physician about how this treatment will provide more options for patients—but also includes quotes from an oncology nurse about how this treatment might affect a patient on an everyday level, when they’re at home after receiving it. Currently, we typically get the first story: the one that only includes quotes from the researcher and physician. But the second story gives a much deeper perspective that would benefit readers. For this type of reporting to happen, health system media relations people need to cultivate and support nurses as sources for the press and then suggest and offer those nurses as sources when appropriate.

To the second point, as a nurse reporter myself, I’ve adopted a mission through my RN2writer project “to transform health care communications by making nurse-created content the industry standard for excellence.” Toward that end, I train other nurses in basic journalism skills to start them on a path toward a reporting career. You know, there’s a lot of inaccurate health information on the web. I think one way to combat that is by having nurses produce more health content. I think, subsequently, that publishing more nurse-created health content will reinforce the understanding that patient education is the essence of what we do as nurses.

New RN Survey Results: Nurses a Little Grayer, Slightly More Diverse

New RN Survey Results: Nurses a Little Grayer, Slightly More Diverse

The U.S. nursing population has grown a bit more diverse in recent years, but most RNs are still white and female, according to a national survey from the Health Resources and Services Administration — and the average age is creeping upward.

According to the 2018 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN), close to 4 million licensed RNs in the U.S. were working as of Dec. 31, 2017, representing a 29% increase from the NSSRN’s 2008 findings.

The report also showed that almost three-quarters of nurses are non-Hispanic white, and that about nine in 10 are women. Also, the current RN population is “graying” — the 2008 survey reported that 44.7% of RNs were over age 50; the 2018 NSSRN survey put that percentage at 47.5%.

The NSSRN findings are in line with what the American Nurses Association (ANA) expected, said Cheryl Peterson, MSN, BSN, vice president of nursing programs for ANA.

But, she added, “I think we would all say that we are disappointed that we didn’t see more of an increase in the diversity of nursing between 2008 and now. We have to look again at… why people of color are not choosing nursing as a profession.”

The NSSRN identified a slight change in the proportion of minority RNs, driven primarily by an increase in Hispanic nurses. Specifically, 10.2% of RNs in the 2018 survey were Hispanic, 7.8% non-Hispanic black, 5.2% Asian, and 1.7% multiracial. Racial and ethnic minority groups accounted for 26.7% of all RNs who responded to the survey.

Healthcare needs to remove barriers to recruiting more nurses in communities where they are underrepresented, Peterson stressed, and “not just Hispanic and African American, but Native American as well as Asian and Pacific Islander and Alaska natives.”

In terms of men entering the RN workforce, the 2018 report found that male RNs made up 9.6% of the total population, a slight bump from 7.1% in the 2008 NSSRN survey.

Scott Kelnhofer, executive director of the American Association for Men in Nursing, said the organization was “encouraged” by the rise in the percentage of men in the profession.

“We anticipate the percentage will continue to grow in the coming years, based on the increasing number of men who are pursuing nursing degrees around the country, and as more men realize the benefits of entering a profession where there is such a high demand for a skilled and diverse workforce,” Kelnhofer wrote in an email.

The U.S. nursing population has grown a bit more diverse in recent years, but most registered nurses (RNs) are still white and female, according to a national survey from the Health Resources and Services Administration — and the average age is creeping upward.

According to the 2018 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN), close to 4 million licensed RNs in the U.S. were working as of Dec. 31, 2017, representing a 29% increase from the NSSRN’s 2008 findings.

The report also showed that almost three-quarters of nurses are non-Hispanic white, and that about nine in 10 are women. Also, the current RN population is “graying” — the 2008 survey reported that 44.7% of RNs were over age 50; the 2018 NSSRN survey put that percentage at 47.5%.

The NSSRN findings are in line with what the American Nurses Association (ANA) expected, said Cheryl Peterson, MSN, BSN, vice president of nursing programs for ANA.

But, she added, “I think we would all say that we are disappointed that we didn’t see more of an increase in the diversity of nursing between 2008 and now. We have to look again at… why people of color are not choosing nursing as a profession.”

The NSSRN identified a slight change in the proportion of minority RNs, driven primarily by an increase in Hispanic nurses. Specifically, 10.2% of RNs in the 2018 survey were Hispanic, 7.8% non-Hispanic black, 5.2% Asian, and 1.7% multiracial. Racial and ethnic minority groups accounted for 26.7% of all RNs who responded to the survey.

Healthcare needs to remove barriers to recruiting more nurses in communities where they are underrepresented, Peterson stressed, and “not just Hispanic and African American, but Native American as well as Asian and Pacific Islander and Alaska natives.”

In terms of men entering the RN workforce, the 2018 report found that male RNs made up 9.6% of the total population, a slight bump from 7.1% in the 2008 NSSRN survey.

Scott Kelnhofer, executive director of the American Association for Men in Nursing, said the organization was “encouraged” by the rise in the percentage of men in the profession.

“We anticipate the percentage will continue to grow in the coming years, based on the increasing number of men who are pursuing nursing degrees around the country, and as more men realize the benefits of entering a profession where there is such a high demand for a skilled and diverse workforce,” Kelnhofer wrote in an email.

The U.S. Census Bureau in partnership with the National Center for Health Workforce Analysis periodically conducts surveys that examine race, age, gender, educational attainment, and other key characteristics of the nursing workforce. The first survey was conducted in 1977.

More than 50,000 active RNs completed the 2018 survey (online or on paper). The sample was randomly selected from licensure records provided by the National Council of the State Boards of Nursing, and sorted by state, license type, and other demographics in order to determine the appropriate sampling rate from each state. The response rate was 50.1% (49.1% weighted).

Aging Workforce

In the current survey, mean age of survey respondents was 47.9, up from an average of 47.0 in the 2008 NSSRN survey.

Employers who aren’t paying attention to which of their RNs are nearing retirement could find themselves “in a world of hurt,” Peterson said, and may have to reconsider how they can keep RNs in direct patient care for longer.

She said that one strategy would be to rethink traditional nursing work schedules: “Are we so wedded to 12-hour shifts that we can’t reduce to [8-hour shifts], or look at other staffing patterns that might better suit a nurse who is older?”

It’s also important that employers attract younger RNs to their facilities while the more experienced nurses are still available to teach them, she said.

Education and Experience

Almost 64% of nurses said they earned a bachelor’s degree or other higher degree, with 19.3% reporting that they earned a graduate degree. But that leaves 29.6% of RNs whose highest level of education was an associate degree, and 6.4% whose highest attainment was an RN diploma.

“The complexity of healthcare is such that it warrants a higher level of education than even probably a diploma, but those programs are out there… they are part of the house of nursing and we support that,” Peterson said.

She noted that the 2011 Future of Nursing report stated a goal of having 80% of nurses earn a baccalaureate degree by 2020, Peterson noted. Still, while it’s unlikely the workforce will hit that mark this year, “we’ve made significant progress,” she said.

The current report also found that 11.5% of all RNs earned a graduate degree and an advanced practice certification versus 8.1% reporting the same in 2008.

The 2018 survey showed that registered advanced practice nurses (APNs) made up about 11.5% of the nursing workforce. A relative handful of RNs, 5%, received their training outside the U.S.

Telehealth

Telehealth technologies were available to 32.9% of RNs in 2017 and, of those, 50.3% report using some version of telehealth “in their primary nursing position.”

Provider-to-provider consults made up 54.4% of telehealth use and calls from nurses to patients made up about 50%.

Peterson said the rise in telehealth is not surprising. “We see the National Quality Forum, and some of these value-based purchasing plans, that are really …placing value — including monetary value — on follow-up phone calls, [and] follow-up televisits to patients after they’ve left the hospital,” she said.

Peterson said she expects to see more reliance on telehealth with the increasing use of technologies such as wearables.

“I think this is where nursing has the capacity to do … some really good work,” she said, “being able to appropriately and adequately advise patients” by leveraging algorithms and their own critical thinking to provide guidance and feedback to patients outside the office.

Salaries

Full-time RNs earned a median salary of $73,929; the median for part-time RNs was $39,985.

There was a significant gap between male and female for median full-time earnings, with male RNs earning $79,928 per year and female RNs earning $71,960, according to the survey results.

Peterson said that she has not heard any complaints from nurses about a pay disparity. “I think it’s more about career choices,” she said: male RNs tend to work in places where there is a salary differential, such as emergency departments, ICUs, and in management.

by Shannon Firth, Washington Correspondent, MedPage Today

Originally published in MedPage Today

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